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  1. #1
    Jon
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    1877 Le Creusot world's largest steam hammer

    The Creusot steam hammer was a 100-ton hammer built in 1877 in Le Creusot, France. Until it was bested by a 125-ton hammer in 1891, the Creusot steam hammer was the most powerful hammer in the world. The hammer was in operation until 1930. In 1969, it was disassembled and rebuilt in the town square. Though no longer attached to a steam source, it still stands today, and is recognized as an International Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.



    The hammer anvil weighs 750 tons, and it was installed on a 1-meter thick oak bed, on solid masonry, built on bedrock below the soil. It was fed by four separate steam furnaces. At the time, it was legendary not only for its record-breaking 100-ton striking capacity, but also for its finesse. The hammer often performed public demonstrations of its accuracy, including corking bottles, breaking eggs in wine glasses, or cracking a nut shell without damaging the nut inside.





    A full-scale wooden replica of the Creusot Hammer was displayed at the Paris Universal Exposition in 1878.

    Some people believe that the famous hammer was an inspiration for another French landmark that was constructed 10 years later - the Eiffel Tower. Sounds crazy, right? Take a look at the Le Creusot Hammer and the Eiffel Tower side-by-side:




    More: American Society of Mechanical Engineers: Le Creusot Hammer

  2. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Jon For This Useful Post:

    C-Bag (01-12-2017), Frank S (01-12-2017), PJs (01-12-2017), Stirmind (01-16-2017)

  3. #2
    PJs
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    The simple beauty of it is stunning imho. The hollow curvature of the base is beauty, function and strength! And to be built in 1877 impressive to say the least! The foundry must have been inspiring also.

    Thanks, ~PJ
    ‘‘When you are in it up to your ears, keep your mouth shut’’ Anonymous ~PJ

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    That is amazing. The first thing I noticed was the resemblance to the tower and wondered which was made first. The next thing I wondered is what they were hammering with 100tons? Then to be able to control it to break and egg into a wine glass blows my mind. Only the French would have made a steam hammer estheticaly pleasing, not to mention the two curved cranes to either side.
    Simply magnificent.

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    PJs (01-14-2017)

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    Frank S's Avatar
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    Here is the full PDF article form the ASME ( American Society of Mechanical Engineers 1981
    https://www.asme.org/getmedia/581f0e...am-Hammer.aspx
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

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    PJs
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    Thanks Frank for the PDF. Having been a member for many years and the SME (Society of Manufacturing Engineers) one forgets after a time how good the resources are in them. I much appreciated the recall and article to support the post!!

    Some of the details of the article fascinated me. Particularly the 36' deep footings to bedrock and the 1 meter timbers for the base, but the Anvil at 750T in 6 pieces, at what I would assume would be ~125T each was really inspiring as to how they forged them (in the day in small Bessemer converters) and put them in place with those arch cranes rated at 120T. The picture of the cross section of the shop gives a real magnitude of what it took to support and use this incredible press, let a lone build it at the time, in a short time frame.

    I also find it most inspiring to see the history of engineering and architecture that comes from the strengths and beauty of platonic solids and sacred geometry, making it a feast for the eyes and soul as well as practical.
    Last edited by PJs; 01-14-2017 at 12:26 PM.
    ‘‘When you are in it up to your ears, keep your mouth shut’’ Anonymous ~PJ

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    Frank S's Avatar
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    Your"er welcome PJs;
    If there is 1 thing that I miss more than anything else is it my rather extensive engineering library.secondly I guess it would have to be the computer I assembled for my office actually 2 computers since I had 1 at home and 1 at work both were twins and would make this little 4 processor 64 bit 16g DDRM 1 tb hard drive laptop look like a 1st generation smart phone.
    I find myself all too often thinking I have that or where did I read that, then I spend sometimes hours diving down 1 rabbit hole after the next until I find where someone has published what I was looking for.
    Folks like "Imhotep" who may very well be the first structural engineer, Archimedes who everyone knows for his invention of the screw pump and as being one of the great mathematicians of all time
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

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  11. #7
    Jon
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    Whatever you do, don't click on this link. You'll fall down a rabbit hole and never return:

    List of Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmarks from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers

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  13. #8
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    Jon you of all people should know by now never to say (whatever you do don't click on this link) that is a sure fire way to loose members from these forums they will be lost in cyber search for the rest of their lives LOL
    great link thanks,I'm off to the link again see ya in a million years
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

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    PJs (01-15-2017)

  15. #9
    PJs
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    Uh Oh, I went out to look for myself...If I return before I get back, Please keep me here.

    Thanks Jon, Good one!


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    ‘‘When you are in it up to your ears, keep your mouth shut’’ Anonymous ~PJ

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