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Thread: 6 way Dover blade conversion questions

  1. #1

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    6 way Dover blade conversion questions

    Having bought a very used (abused?) 1956 420c John Deere dozer with a 2 way POWER (up n down) blade and very manual angle, I have been pondering how best and simplest to convert to a 6 way blade ( up n down, power angle, power bevel). A commercial arangment that I have seen is the use of a ball joint as a primary pivot with a ball end link at the top of the blade, allowing compound angels in a simple manner. Can anyone put their 2 cents in on the idea of using a 3 inch gooseneck ball hitch for the main pivot? The dozer is rated at about 4500 lbs with out the blade, maby 5500 lbs w blade. Rated at about 3700 lbs push. The blade is 66 inches wide if i remember correctly. Off the shelf parts such as hitch parts would save much valuble time. The 3 inch ball that i have been looking at is rated for 30,000 lbs gross trailer weight. The trailer coupler that has cought my eye is sometning like a coffee cup that sits over the ball and is retained with a 3/4 inch pin that passes thru the "cup" below the ball end by the neck of the ball to retain the ball. If this sounds like I need to have my coat put on backwards with the sleeves tied please tell me to continue to ponder new ideas. Thank you in advance for any help with this "to be build".

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  3. #2
    KustomsbyKent's Avatar
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    I think you're onto something with that idea.... but first, what do you plan on using the dozer for? Commercial work or personal work around a farm/acreage? If its for personal use, I'd say plow ahead! It's unlikely that it will break in normal use, but if it does, it just costs you some time and effort to fix. If it's for commercial use, then you likely want to do a lot more in-depth research before starting.
    How you use it is going to be an influencer as well. If you are smooth and easy on stuff, it will likely work just fine, and will probably outlast that JD dozer. If you are hard on stuff, and abuse it, well, more than likely that JD is going to break first.
    I think the limiting factor is the dozer itself, and as long as you don't go trying to bust out some concrete or tree stumps, it will probably work just fine.
    Any pictures of the Dozer? I'm a big fan of dozers.
    How are the track rollers and the track itself? It could get pretty expensive if you have to do a lot of track repair.
    I look forward to seeing more on this project, so keep us updated!

    Thanks
    Kent

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    Thanks for the reply. I will try to post some pics. Digital Tec and I have a very uneasy relationship. I will be using the dozer for my own use. My uncle saw the dozer and said that it must be made well to have survived the hard use ( abuse ). The mounting points that would be used to mount a gearmatic winch are all broken! The blade frame is bent, no loss chopping it up to 6 way it. Lots of wear but it functions and I could afford it. I grew up using and learning to run a jd m tractor, the forerunner of the chassis that is used for the 420c. I am planning on gathering parts for the conversion before I start. If I can afford the additional parts the top link will be a small hydraulic cylinder to make it 8 way, changing the angel of attack of the cutting edge. If you are a dozer fan check out jdcrawlers.com, from lindman's up thru 450's. Tremendous knolege base there! Thanks for the encouragement Kent.
    Ps I plan on having the ball hitch components unbolt for replacement, perhaps a innertube boot to help keep dirt out and lube fittings all around.

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    The day I brought it home6 way Dover blade conversion questions-0826161930.jpg

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    Ordered a plane spherical bearing used on hydraulic cylinders for compensating for misalignment. 2 1/2" I'd, 4 3/8" od, about 7 pounds. Overkill but the eBay price was right. 14 deg of angle one way should give about 18" of blade bevel in 75" blade width. 4" sch 40 pipe split with clamping bolts should make a socket for the bearing. To be continued.....

  7. #6

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    The bearing came today, not with out some stress. First thing I noticed was a hairline crack in the outer race!!!!!! But after some research it is part of the manufacturing process. (Spherical bearings are new to me) The next thing that I noticed was that the angulation was listed wrong, 9 degrees not 14, this bearing is a sealed one with the same pn as one with out a seal. At 9 deg the blade will come almost 12 inches off the ground corner to corner or out of parallel with the tracks. At 14 deg just over 18 inches, more like what I envisioned. I suppose that I can run it at 14 deg and just not have a total seal at max angle. Maybe some cobbled up boot to help keep grit out. Any guidance would be much appreciated. Thanks
    Eric

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    Frank S's Avatar
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    Since are not graders and cannot side shift their blades the side to side elevated angles need not be too extreme since one track will be following the down side of the cut. To maintain the desired constant gradient the blade needs adjusted to a lessor cut angle frequently.
    You will also find that shallower cut angles will have less of a tendency to cause the dozer to try and crab crawl due to the heavier loading on one side of the blade.
    You may find that the 9° will be enough you could always knock out the seals later if need be
    Have you given thought to whether or not you will have to stiffen the back of the blade or will the center pivot and a cylinder connected to each side of the arms be enough?
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

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    For better or worse the seals do not limit the angle of the bearing, as you say most of the time the angle will be relitively flat. Likely will build to 14 deg or there abouts. Having the option to tip the blade to "ditch" with it is a plus. The town has several places where they divert the ditch onto my property, hope to put some erosion controll in to effect at some point. The blade is heavier than some I have seen. The stress cracks in it indicate reifocement is warranted, really necessary. Thanks for the input Frank S. From your posts I value your input. Thanks again.
    Eric


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