Free 173 Best Homemade Tools eBook:  
Remove advertisements
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: about to transport

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Sandy, OR
    Posts
    40
    Thanks
    30
    Thanked 7 Times in 4 Posts

    about to transport

    Don't know if this is an apropos question here, but I've seen some truly inventive ideas pop up here.

    I'm about to transport two large surface plates (~2500 lbs each) on a trailer. I'm inclined to leave them on their mounting platform (nom. 30" high) and just lash them to the deck of the trailer....but I'm not a long haul trucker.....any hints?

  2. #2
    ncollar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    264
    Thanks
    20
    Thanked 117 Times in 86 Posts
    mudnducs
    If you put them next to one an other and strap them in all directions. Any movement is will not be good. Strap both tables to make it as rigid as possible.
    I do not know what kind of vehicle you have but you are talking 2 1/2 tons, 5000 lbs will need a large truck. I would want something over 2 1/2 tons.
    Nelson

  3. #3
    Toolmaker51's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Posts
    1,023
    Thanks
    2,200
    Thanked 1,044 Times in 580 Posts

    Toolmaker51's Tools
    Lashed together or not, my first concern is side and concentrated loads on the frames. These will multiply in turns, bumps and rigidity of the trailer or truck frame. Rarely anything, usually nothing 'locks' a surface plate to it's platform.
    I'd arrange a suitable capacity forklift [weight + load's center of gravity] and some timber cribbing. Load the platforms on top, set on carpet scraps.
    I won't call myself an expert, but studied what and how for just under 200,000 pounds from Los Angeles to the Midwest. Riggers did all the work; after I was convinced by one of 3 bidders.
    All said and done, if possible arrange for machinery movers. They'll show up with lifts, flat bed/ lowboy and all dunnage needed. Not to mention insurance.
    I had a large [read green one in the avatar] lathe moved 100 miles for $350. They were done in two hours. Certainly wouldn't been able to even rent all the gear for that.
    I make these recommendations based on simple facts. A damaged frame has little value but scrap, or hangs up installation. A broken surface plate has no value at all...
    Last edited by Toolmaker51; 04-11-2018 at 10:08 PM.
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

  4. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Toolmaker51 For This Useful Post:

    Paul Jones (04-12-2018), PJs (04-18-2018)

  5. #4
    hemmjo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    68
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 44 Times in 23 Posts

    hemmjo's Tools
    Provided you have appropriate tow vehicle and trailer, moving 5000 pounds is not big a deal at all. My little Tacoma is rated to pull 6500 pounds. We are missing a lot of critical details out about your situation to make a good recommendation. How far do you need to move them? What equipment do you have access to at each end? Are the plates cast or stone? What is the physical size of the plates?

    The weight is not the issue, 5000 pounds is only one car or a nice boat. Any respectable backhoe can lift 2500 pounds onto your trailer. But a skid loader may be at its upper limit getting it high enough to load. Rather the sensitivity of the surface plates is the concern. I would not try to move them on the stand or mounting platform. I doubt that the mount or stand is designed for the changing loads and bumps of hauling. Strapping the plates down while on the mounts will add huge loads to the mount, in addition to the weight of the plates. If you can remove the plates without a huge effort, I would move them separate.

    If you really do not want to take them apart, you should use cribbing to support the weight rather than allow the mounts to do that while traveling. OR, perhaps make a "bed" for the plate from lumber, ridged foam insulation, and a CLEAN piece of carpet. It would look like this. trailer bed, 2 x 4's face down on the bed perpendicular to frame rails spaced maybe 12" OC. 3/4 plywood screwed to the 2 x 4's to make a floor with no bumps. 1 or 2" ridged foam with a few lines of glue to hold it in place on the plywood. A piece of clean carpet over the foam. Then turn the plate face DOWN on the bed so the weight is low and the mount is not carrying the load in transit. Strap it down good.

    Good Luck,

    John
    Last edited by hemmjo; 04-12-2018 at 06:55 AM.

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to hemmjo For This Useful Post:

    mwmkravchenko (04-12-2018)

  7. #5
    Frank S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Peacock TX
    Posts
    2,444
    Thanks
    448
    Thanked 2,213 Times in 1,080 Posts

    Frank S's Tools
    Some pretty good advice has already been offered.
    For moving surface plates which are usually just large slabs of polished granite sometimes made of cast iron I would be very Leary of trying to turn them upside down.
    depending on how the stands are constructed the plates my also be difficult to remove from them This posses a problem the stands usually will not have sufficient structure to support the plates while in transit.
    Since you did not offer any specs about your transport vehicle or trailer I will only be able to offer some generality tips assuming ( and we know what that means) that your trailer is large enough to transport the 2 plates on their stand or not without having to stack them, ( Something you only want to do if transporting the plates without the stands} Let's start out with the possibility of transport on the stands first the floor of the trailer needs to be strong enough to support the point loading of the legs then cribbing needs to be built up under the unsupported areas of the plates or under the cross beans of the stands if there are any. this is to spread the load over a larger area of the trailer and to support the centers of the plates. Don't be afraid to really pack it in under there. the smaller unsupported area of the plate the less chance for cracking. due to it being jostled up and down from the bumps in the road.
    proper securement of the load is of upmost importance The Department of transportation has many rules and guidelines in this area for good reasons, but what that boils down to is a minimum of 2 bindings per pallet along the length of a transport vehicle or in this case 2 straps over the top of each plate going across from side to side. the guidelines go further to tell about the strength of the bindings in your case these are going to be straps never use chains over any surface which can be damaged you could and probably should use chains at each of the 4 corners of the stands at the legs to prevent them from moving
    The weight of the plates on the stands is going to be both a natural limiting factor in their trying to shift and at the same time create the possibility of allowing the kinetic energy to be built up in the inertia of mass so flat nylon straps are needed to secure this.the top surfaces of the plates must be protected from being scratched or chipped layer of plastic film with foam padding on top covered with plywood should do this adding plastic strap protectors or a doubled up swatch or carpet where the straps go over the corners will protect the straps from being cut as well as prevent chipping. I prefer using 2 4 inch nylon straps but using 4 2 inch straps will do
    the last thing is the transport vehicle and trailer the trailer by law in just about every state needs brakes for hauling anything over 1000 lbs and the tow vehicle must be rated for towing the gross weight of the trailer plus the load. if you have any full sized half ton or larger pickup made after 1970 it should have such towing capacity. This depends a lot on how well it has been maintained though.Tires brakes and so forth. the trailer if it is a tandem axle utility trailer with at least 3500 lb axles and brakes on at least one axle with LT or ST tires ( light truck or Special transport)that are in good condition it should be close enough (CONDITION) is the key word here. and if it has passenger car tires on it then they should have a minimum of double the combined load capacity of the axle
    This would be the absolute minimums for the vehicle and the trailer for transporting over any long distances short distances and traveling under 30 MPH you may be alright but only safe if you have good brakes Remember when pulling a trailer of any kind your following distances need to be doubled or quadrupled depending on how well the load is distributed on the trailer too much tongue weight and you loose steering control too much tail weight and it will wag your tow vehicle like a dogs tail called fish tailing VERY DANGEROUS
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Frank S For This Useful Post:

    Paul Jones (04-13-2018), Toolmaker51 (04-12-2018)

  9. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Sandy, OR
    Posts
    40
    Thanks
    30
    Thanked 7 Times in 4 Posts
    Thanks to you all gents!

    Got them back home last Saturday without incident! Many nylon straps tying them together and tying them down!

    about to transport-surface-plates-2.jpgabout to transport-surface-plates-1.jpg

  10. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to mudnducs For This Useful Post:

    Frank S (04-18-2018), Jon (04-19-2018), Paul Jones (04-18-2018), PJs (04-18-2018)

  11. #7
    ncollar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    264
    Thanks
    20
    Thanked 117 Times in 86 Posts
    Home in one piece is always the best out come. Looks like you had the right piece of equipment for moving it. Too many times people do not factor in the weight and the pulling vehicle does not have enough power or braking specs, but success is always great.
    Very good job.
    Nelson

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to ncollar For This Useful Post:

    mudnducs (04-19-2018)

  13. #8
    Frank S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Peacock TX
    Posts
    2,444
    Thanks
    448
    Thanked 2,213 Times in 1,080 Posts

    Frank S's Tools
    Great job. I always have a tendency to over explain when I hear of someone making a move of an item and form their posts it may sound like they may be trying to do something without full knowledge of how to go about it.
    I guess if I fail at anything it will never be under emphasizing the value of being safe.
    I guess it is because I have witnessed far too many ignoring a safety protocol ending in disasters
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

  14. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Frank S For This Useful Post:

    mudnducs (04-19-2018), Paul Jones (04-19-2018), PJs (04-19-2018)

  15. #9
    Toolmaker51's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Posts
    1,023
    Thanks
    2,200
    Thanked 1,044 Times in 580 Posts

    Toolmaker51's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank S View Post
    Great job. I always have a tendency to over explain when I hear of someone making a move of an item and form their posts it may sound like they may be trying to do something without full knowledge of how to go about it.
    I guess if I fail at anything it will never be under emphasizing the value of being safe.
    I guess it is because I have witnessed far too many ignoring a safety protocol ending in disasters
    Coupled with all our other recommendations, such as Nelson reinforcing those about towing capacity, shows what 'community' is all about. A safe project is a safe project.
    Did shared observations from various viewpoints help this move of surface plates go well?
    Maybe. Whats more, the near certainty that it helps the NEXT undertaking.


    Post your reply!
    Join 33,912 of us and get our 173 Must Read Homemade Tools eBook free.



    173 Must Read Homemade Tools
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

  16. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Toolmaker51 For This Useful Post:

    Frank S (04-19-2018), mudnducs (04-19-2018), Paul Jones (04-19-2018), PJs (04-19-2018)

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •