Free 50 Best Homemade Tools eBook:  
Remove advertisements
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Adventures of trike repairman

  1. #1
    C-Bag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    California, central coast
    Posts
    720
    Thanks
    689
    Thanked 828 Times in 466 Posts

    C-Bag's Tools

    Adventures of trike repairman

    My SO and I own and ride tadpole trikes Tadpole trike stands Hers is a Terra Trike with a front end that doesn't have sealed bearings on it like my ICE. It has brass bushings pressed into the steering knuckle. I'd been having a hard time getting the disk brakes to work properly without dragging. I noticed it had a lot of slop in the bushings and it finally decided it was time to tear into it. I also suspected that's why it didn't roll as freely as mine too as there was no way to do an accurate alignment. Here it is without the pivot pin.
    Adventures of trike repairman-image.jpg
    After making the first bushing I realized the steering knuckle was not round so had to make the rest with a .003 press fit to make sure it was going not come lose ever again. I also left them .030 thicker to give a nicer fit in the frame. I put the bushings in the freezer for 20min and a little synthetic grease on the knuckle and pressed the bushings home. The knuckle pins are 12mm I guess as they were .470 and the closest reamer I had was 15/32 .468. Ended up filing down the pins to .467 as I couldn't wait for the adjustable reamer I ordered to show up. Now it was time to get a nice fit in the frame. I tried to think how to approach taking the .025 or so off the upper bushing, and thought WWOD? (what would Olderdan do? and decided to make an arbor for the lathe. One end is .467 for the knuckle and the other .5 to go in the tail chuck. I had a 1" worn out mill I'd inherited with my mill/drill and put it on the sharpener and put 3deg angle of cut on it with no 1deg dish so it wouldn't bite into the brass(hopefully). I also remembered what TM51 said about not chucking up the mill directly in the 3 jaw chuck and got out the arbor I also inherited with the mill/drill and mounted the mill in it and off I went.
    Adventures of trike repairman-image.jpgAdventures of trike repairman-image.jpgAdventures of trike repairman-image.jpg
    I was able to fit each knuckle and install the pin and tighten it till everything moved freely with little or no slop.

    For the first time I'm able to adjust the brakes properly and the alignment seems dead on. I've not gotten a side by side rolling test with the two trikes on a hill yet as that will be the true test. In the past if we started out even coasting mine would just pull away.

    I also replaced the wheel bearings while in there and that proved to be an adventure too as they didn't see fit to provide reliefs in the bearing spacer to get a bite on the bearing to drive them out with. Along with a very finiky fit to make the bearings fit in the hubs with the spacer and then be tightened on the spindle.
    Last edited by C-Bag; 12-05-2016 at 07:27 AM.

  2. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to C-Bag For This Useful Post:

    Paul Jones (12-15-2016), PJs (12-04-2016)

  3. #2
    Frank S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Peacock TX
    Posts
    1,967
    Thanks
    337
    Thanked 1,913 Times in 929 Posts

    Frank S's Tools
    Nice use of an arbor to hold the knuckle in the tail stock much faster than having to make set up to mount on your mill table
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Frank S For This Useful Post:

    Paul Jones (12-15-2016)

  5. #3
    C-Bag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    California, central coast
    Posts
    720
    Thanks
    689
    Thanked 828 Times in 466 Posts

    C-Bag's Tools
    Thanks Frank.

    I've got a LOT to learn and when I realized I'd not thought the whole process through as throughly as I should have I started spinning. Just like you said, trying to figure out how I was going to mount that spindle in the mill securely was making my noob head hurt. I meant it as a joke partially but Olderdan's all lathe solutions for stuff is pretty inspiring. So when I remembered the old 1" mill and the arbor to mount it in the lathe, the arbor was the logical solution.

  6. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to C-Bag For This Useful Post:

    Paul Jones (12-15-2016), PJs (12-04-2016), Toolmaker51 (12-15-2016)

  7. #4
    PJs
    PJs is offline
    PJs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Northern CA
    Posts
    881
    Thanks
    4,671
    Thanked 717 Times in 455 Posts

    PJs's Tools
    Terrific build C-Bag! I love the way you thought with the "Ways of Olderdan"! Excellent "spherical thinking" as Frank puts it on the regrind of the mill to the application, with TM's tip on mills in 3 jaws. Too bad your reamer didn't get there on time but you pushed through in style, imho!

    There is a lot to be said about that creativity of building something better than it was before (with a bit of inspiration of others), making tools to make the parts, etc. that takes a project/product/thing to that next level of quality...Lights My Candle! Collectively eclectic consortium!

    Great build C-Bag. If she beats you are you going to do yours too...with tapered rollers?

    ~PJ
    Last edited by PJs; 12-04-2016 at 11:34 AM.
    ‘‘Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest.’’
    Mark Twain

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to PJs For This Useful Post:

    C-Bag (12-04-2016), Paul Jones (12-15-2016)

  9. #5
    Frank S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Peacock TX
    Posts
    1,967
    Thanks
    337
    Thanked 1,913 Times in 929 Posts

    Frank S's Tools
    Being 100% autodidact when it comes to just about any machinist work. My methods of using lathes, Mills, bandsaws and just about any other machine you can think of would make most trained machinists cringe, but having done it my way for neigh on 50 years and still have both eyes and all digits of my fingers and have never broken or damaged a machine I guess it would be a little late in life to go to school and change LOL
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to Frank S For This Useful Post:

    Paul Jones (12-15-2016)

  11. #6
    C-Bag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    California, central coast
    Posts
    720
    Thanks
    689
    Thanked 828 Times in 466 Posts

    C-Bag's Tools
    The biggest eye opener for me is the creative attitude to machining on display here at HMT. As long as it's safe it's ok. I always thought being a machinist was a little more confining with strict ways to do things. But seeing some of the behind the scenes where folks who have been doing it for decades like FrankS, Olderdan, Paul, PJ and TM51 to name a few have given me the insight there's a lot more creativity involved than strict procedures.

    I thought when I got my lo buck 9x20 & RF-30 it was just to make simple parts. But the ability to make more precision tools to accomplish things I could have only dreamt of doing before is an ever evolving revelation. Its also a lot like my mech work in that once you have the basics it's all about the old hand tips. Those are the kinds of things that you'd pick up working with some experienced guy in a shop. So these little tips that surface at the end of threads are the cool stuff for me, like TM51's using a small ball mill to start a angled hole, just to name a recent one, whoda thunk!

  12. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to C-Bag For This Useful Post:

    Paul Jones (12-15-2016), PJs (12-04-2016)

  13. #7
    Frank S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Peacock TX
    Posts
    1,967
    Thanks
    337
    Thanked 1,913 Times in 929 Posts

    Frank S's Tools
    C-bag strict procedures have their place many of us have over the years developed our own as well as use those found in books like the Colvin & Stanley American machinist handbook. And the ever present Bible the Machinery Handbook
    I think that when I was first attempting to teach my self some basics my 4th addition of the American Machinist and the 14th addition of the Machinery's handbook were probably the most valuable tools in my kit at the time. Later when I was in High school I managed to talk a librarian out of an old dog eared Smoleys combined tables, I thought I was ready to set the world on end at the tender age of 16. I had been working at the Blacksmith shop for 5 years I owned a lathe a welding machine and had 3 books and a slide rule what more could a young man need? Possibly let myself get talked into Joining the Army @17? YEP.
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

  14. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Frank S For This Useful Post:

    C-Bag (12-14-2016), Paul Jones (12-15-2016), PJs (12-05-2016), Toolmaker51 (12-15-2016)

  15. #8
    Content Editor DIYer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    3,084
    Thanks
    321
    Thanked 621 Times in 562 Posts


    Thanks C-Bag! We've added your Tricycle Steering Bushing Replacement to our Bicycle category,
    as well as to your builder page: C-Bag's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:




  16. #9
    Content Editor DIYer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    3,084
    Thanks
    321
    Thanked 621 Times in 562 Posts


    Thanks C-Bag! We've added your Arbor to our Machining category,
    as well as to your builder page: C-Bag's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:

    tags: arbor



  17. #10
    Toolmaker51's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Posts
    881
    Thanks
    1,934
    Thanked 946 Times in 508 Posts

    Toolmaker51's Tools
    C-Bags downhill dynanometer may have a result inducing fault. We ride two wheelers and I lose the downhill test consistently. I credit a pair of aerodynamic fairings carried by the distaff side, much to her disdain.
    Or mountain bike vs tour bike with 90psi tires...
    Last edited by Toolmaker51; 12-15-2016 at 08:22 PM.
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

  18. The Following User Says Thank You to Toolmaker51 For This Useful Post:

    PJs (12-16-2016)

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •