Free 173 Best Homemade Tools eBook:  
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Base for a Milwaukee handheld

  1. #1
    mklotz mklotz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    LA, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,776
    Thanks
    137
    Thanked 3,431 Times in 1,173 Posts

    mklotz's Tools

    Base for a Milwaukee handheld

    My Milwaukee version of the Dremel hand tool, which I first discussed here...

    Dremel fan

    has a number of advantages over the available Dremels but one of them is not weight. It's too heavy and rotund to be held like a pencil so in many cases it's better to bring the work to the tool rather than vice versa. Laying the tool on the bench doesn't work well; its round shape means it wants to roll about.

    I decided to make a base for it that would make it stable when laid on the bench. A steel cradle with an integral large hose clamp was screwed to a chunk of 2 x 4 and strapped onto the Milwaukee as shown. Now it sits stably at a convenient working height as shown here..



    The tool is heavy enough that work requiring only light pressure (e.g. sanding small pieces) can be done without further ado. Heavier work requires an addition described below.

    The fact that the Milwaukee has its rather heavy battery at the rear of the tool allows the assembly to be tipped up as shown here...



    This makes it easy to work facing the business end of the tool in the chuck, an arrangement that's almost impossible if the tool were handheld. If the weight of the battery isn't enough in this position, or the horizontal mode mentioned above, applying a shot-filled bean bag, as discussed here...

    A bean bag for the shop

    will make things a great deal more stable.



    For even greater stability and an almost limitless variety of working positions, attaching a Panavise with a universal base to a bench hook yields a system that is a joy to use...



    In the spirit of full disclosure, the device that holds the tool to the 2 x 4 was not made by me; it's an ancient commercial device meant to hold an electric drill motor. My contribution was putting the elements together to solve a problem and make a useful tool even more useful. I think that imagining how to combine existing tools to make even more useful assemblages is a tool in its own right and so this belongs on the forum.
    ---
    Regards, Marv


    Home Shop Freeware
    http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

  2. The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to mklotz For This Useful Post:

    DIYer (09-27-2018), Frank S (09-24-2018), Jon (09-24-2018), Paul Jones (09-28-2018), PJs (09-25-2018), ranald (09-24-2018), rossbotics (09-25-2018), Seedtick (09-24-2018), Tule (09-25-2018)

  3. #2
    Frank S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Peacock TX
    Posts
    3,755
    Thanks
    641
    Thanked 3,176 Times in 1,605 Posts

    Frank S's Tools
    I totally Agree Marv, these Dremel style tools while very handy are often cumbersome when needing to work on something small. I like my flex shaft grinders much better but the shaft is often restrictive I have a couple of the micro dremels that just drive me crazy at times.
    What I would really like to get my hands on is a good set of used dentistry drills for the times when I need to do small work.
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Frank S For This Useful Post:

    Tuomas (09-25-2018)

  5. #3
    ranald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Black Mountain Queensland
    Posts
    959
    Thanks
    693
    Thanked 257 Times in 177 Posts

    ranald's Tools
    Great stuff Marv.
    Funny, for many years I used a B & D Workmate as a vice to hold a drill & 4" Makita belt sander & 3" Makita planer (had to remove the shavings bag) & on occassions a 4" grinder(my original Towa was too tapered but a later model was more cylindrical sided) so they were more adaptable:almost like free standing machines. The wooden jaws were strong enough to hold with out tool damage: just have to watch the air vents.
    I tried a similar system to yours for a 3 wheeled 1" sander. The wheels were skate board ones but alas the wooden frame flexed too much and the belt would run off despite the adjustment wheel. Probably would have worked with a RHS steel frame.
    Your system allows angling the tool better. sounds fishy.

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to ranald For This Useful Post:

    Paul Jones (09-28-2018)

  7. #4
    Soikkeli Tuomas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Jyväskylä Finland
    Posts
    544
    Thanks
    359
    Thanked 1,109 Times in 342 Posts

    Tuomas's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank S View Post
    I totally Agree Marv, these Dremel style tools while very handy are often cumbersome when needing to work on something small. I like my flex shaft grinders much better but the shaft is often restrictive I have a couple of the micro dremels that just drive me crazy at times.
    What I would really like to get my hands on is a good set of used dentistry drills for the times when I need to do small work.
    I have set of dentistry drills and grinding points.
    I bought them from military surplus store. Its amazing what you can find there. ��

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to Tuomas For This Useful Post:

    PJs (09-25-2018)

  9. #5
    Frank S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Peacock TX
    Posts
    3,755
    Thanks
    641
    Thanked 3,176 Times in 1,605 Posts

    Frank S's Tools
    I have found many dentistry drills online but there are some things that I insist ongoing the touchy feely route. A couple of years ago there was a complete 5 chair dental surgery at an auction I attended but the lots were grouped in such way that there was no way I was going to bid on anything,
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

  10. #6
    mklotz mklotz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    LA, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,776
    Thanks
    137
    Thanked 3,431 Times in 1,173 Posts

    mklotz's Tools
    Having the tool pointing at you allows you to hold the work with both hands while resting the forearms on the work table. It's hard to imagine a more stable configuration for miniature, handheld work. This, combined with the fact that you're manipulating the (usually) lighter workpiece rather than the much heavier tool provides the maximum in control.
    ---
    Regards, Marv


    Home Shop Freeware
    http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

  11. #7
    PJs
    PJs is offline
    PJs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Northern CA
    Posts
    1,840
    Thanks
    8,314
    Thanked 1,022 Times in 677 Posts

    PJs's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank S View Post
    I totally Agree Marv, these Dremel style tools while very handy are often cumbersome when needing to work on something small. I like my flex shaft grinders much better but the shaft is often restrictive I have a couple of the micro dremels that just drive me crazy at times.
    What I would really like to get my hands on is a good set of used dentistry drills for the times when I need to do small work.
    Frank, here is an Ebay set and many others available there for <$ than a small Foredom handpieces like the H.28 & H.8. Also Carbide Circuit Board drills come in all size and most available on Amazon for good prices down to about .5mm (although likely to "Bink" when used by hand) they are a great inexpensive choice for small stuff.

    Marv, Great idea and easy to build...a great combo...and in a Panavise...priceless!
    ‘‘Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest.’’
    Mark Twain

  12. #8
    Content Editor DIYer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    3,091
    Thanks
    425
    Thanked 883 Times in 815 Posts


    Thanks mklotz! We've added your Rotary Tool Base to our Rotary Tools category,
    as well as to your builder page: mklotz's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:





    Post your reply!
    Join 33,912 of us and get our 173 Must Read Homemade Tools eBook free.



    173 Must Read Homemade Tools

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •