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Thread: Captured allan bolt locking lever

  1. #11
    NortonDommi's Avatar
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    Well I walked into that one eyes wide shut!

  2. #12

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    I just had an idea while reading your thread. Next time you need to put a hex key into a hole, what if you milled a circle hole pattern of 6 small holes of an appropriate size positioned to just clear the points on the hex key? The milling passes outward from the center toward each point would then also clear out the center of that pattern to fit the hex key down into the pattern. I believe it would prevent the hex key from slipping, and not require any special tooling to make it work. Left image is the pattern of holes milled away. Right image is what you have left, with the hex key in it.

    This example I did in CAD is for a 3/8 hex key hole, and the holes to mill away would require a 7/32" or perhaps a 5mm end mill. I don't think the holes could be done with a drill, unfortunately, because of the major amount of overlap.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Captured allan bolt locking lever-make-hex-hole.png  

  3. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Metalmuncher For This Useful Post:

    Moby Duck (04-22-2018), Toolmaker51 (09-02-2017)

  4. #13
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    metalmuncher what you are talking about is very similar to the flank drive sockets
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

  5. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank S View Post
    metalmuncher what you are talking about is very similar to the flank drive sockets
    True! I hadn't thought of that. Rather than doing all the work of my idea, it would seem prudent to just modify a hex socket for whatever means one has in mind of turning the back end. It would be much quicker to utilize a squared off something inserted into said socket, than to mill all that material with a relatively tiny end mill.

  6. #15
    NortonDommi's Avatar
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    And then there are rotary broaches which are not hard to make.

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  8. #16
    ncollar's Avatar
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    Canobi
    All I can say is I like the way you mind works. Why does everything have to be easy or what does it have to be simple?
    You hit it square on and made a very nice job of it. I am very sure we will see more of your wise thinking.
    Keep it coming

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  10. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metalmuncher View Post
    I just had an idea while reading your thread. Next time you need to put a hex key into a hole, what if you milled a circle hole pattern of 6 small holes of an appropriate size positioned to just clear the points on the hex key? The milling passes outward from the center toward each point would then also clear out the center of that pattern to fit the hex key down into the pattern. I believe it would prevent the hex key from slipping, and not require any special tooling to make it work. Left image is the pattern of holes milled away. Right image is what you have left, with the hex key in it.

    This example I did in CAD is for a 3/8 hex key hole, and the holes to mill away would require a 7/32" or perhaps a 5mm end mill. I don't think the holes could be done with a drill, unfortunately, because of the major amount of overlap.
    Neat!

    I will have to have to give that a try once my mill is up and running.

    Thanks metalmuncher
    It's not the destination but the journey you take to get there that matters.

  11. #18
    Canobi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NortonDommi View Post
    And then there are rotary broaches which are not hard to make.
    Depends on skill level + knowlege base, both of which are under construction in my case

    Be that as it may, I came across a really simple design the other day that even my novice skills can turn out, so I'm working on one right now

    There were no drawings of it I could find so made my own as a guide and left the numbers off as it can be scaled to suit. Credit goes to randyc (practical machinist forum) for the concept design:


    Here's where I'm at with it so far. The shank is bright mild that is press fit into the main body, which is made of 306 stainless:

    Last edited by Canobi; 09-03-2017 at 10:20 AM.
    It's not the destination but the journey you take to get there that matters.

  12. #19
    Canobi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ncollar View Post
    Canobi
    All I can say is I like the way you mind works. Why does everything have to be easy or what does it have to be simple?
    You hit it square on and made a very nice job of it. I am very sure we will see more of your wise thinking.
    Keep it coming
    Your most gracious good sir, it was literally a case of need being the mother of invention and used what I had on hand. My favourite situation, keeps the mind on it's toes and out the box
    It's not the destination but the journey you take to get there that matters.

  13. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Canobi View Post
    Depends on skill level + knowlege base, both of which are under construction in my case

    Be that as it may, I came across a really simple design the other day that even my novice skills can turn out, so I'm working on one right now

    There were no drawings of it I could find so made my own as a guide and left the numbers off as it can be scaled to suit. Credit goes to randyc (practical machinist forum) for the concept design:


    Here's where I'm at with it so far. The shank is bright mild that is press fit into the main body, which is made of 306 stainless:


    When I saw Rotary Broach mentioned here I looked them up, as I'd not heard of them before. Very cool! But the retail prices for the holder, the part I see you are making, are crazy expensive, especially for a tool that won't see frequent use as a hobbyist. So I am very interested in your project! I see the actual broach bits for these holders aren't too unreasonable. So if I made a holder, I could see owning a few bits.

    I was wondering how they accomplished the wobble. Your drawing explains that. Did you turn the 1/4" ball, or is that a bearing ball you bought?

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