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Thread: Coping Sled

  1. #1
    morsa's Avatar
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    Coping Sled

    There are lots of models of router table coping sleds, both commercial as homemade (https://www.google.com.mx/search?q=c...HXx6D9AQsAQILg)

    This Project was made in april-2013.

    The base is 1/2” mdf; handles and stops were made with scrap wood.
    Finish is primer and lacquer.

    Coping Sled-1.jpg

    Coping Sled-2.jpg

    Coping Sled-3.jpg

    Coping Sled-4.jpg

    Coping Sled-5.jpg

    Coping Sled-6.jpg

    Coping Sled-7.jpg

    Coping Sled-8.jpg

    Coping Sled-9.jpg

    Regards, morsa.

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    Paul Jones (11-23-2016), PJs (11-23-2016)

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    This sequence of images shows the assembly and also the way of fixing the workpiece:


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    PJs (11-23-2016)

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    PJs
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    Thanks Morsa. I really like your sled Idea and a Nice build. The animated video showing the clamping helped a bit, mainly for clamping work. Do you mainly use this for cabinet making type work, like door corners? Wood working terms are still a bit (actually a lot) of a mystery to me. Coping as I know it, from only a little experience of baseboards and crown molding, is for the corner joints to be near perfect, but your sled seems to make finger/rabbet type joints based on the bits I saw in your link above. Although...it looks to me like you might be able to make a strong, quality scarf joint with something like this also...again small experience. Apologies for my naivety...but curious.
    ‘‘Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest.’’
    Mark Twain

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    Thanks, PJs. You are right; a coping sled is a jig for end-grain cutting at the router table.

    And yes, I use it for frame and panel doors. The coping sled would be used to cut the profile in both ends of the rails; the sacrificial wood behind the workpiece helps to avoid tearing at the end of the cut. The edge-grain cuts, on both the styles and rails, are made without this jig, supporting the workpiece against the fence, with the help of featherboards and push stick. Here you can find the procedure: Frame and Panel Door - Popular Woodworking Magazine

    Of course, there are many profiles for these frame doors: MLCS Rail and Stile Carbide Tipped Router Bits 1

    The technique for coping crown moldings or baseboards with a coping saw is somewhat different. See this link: Coping Crown Molding on Inside Corners

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    Morsa,

    Nice fabrication work on the coping sled and a very professional appearance with your lacquer finishes. The sacrificial wood behind the workpiece is essential and avoids ruining parts. Thanks for the additional links.

    Paul

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    morsa (11-24-2016)

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    PJs
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    Thank you Morsa for the great links and explanations. Hadn't thought of the split at the end but can see it's necessity for end grains, rails and such. Also noticed how critical set up is for doing these kinds of joints and that MLCS had UHMW set up blocks to ease the setup. Routers are such versatile tools but those bit$$ add up quick.

    I've done a house worth of baseboards and crown but really liked that little video link on crown you gave us. That upside down part was a good way to think about it. I found it didn't take too much practice to get decent at coping crown but it wasn't a very complex crown and only a few outsides and a dozen or so scarfs.

    I think I'll relax into the conundrum of terms in wood working...metal has their quirks too.

    Thanks again for the great posts, tips, and info. Happy Thanksgiving to you and Paul!
    ~PJ
    ‘‘Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest.’’
    Mark Twain

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    Thanks, Paul Jones. It is important, in addition to this support with sacrificial wood, to hold the workpiece firmly perpendicular to the fence (or miter guide if it guides the sled). In the end, this is the goal of all models of coping sleds, whether simple or highly sophisticated.

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    Thanks, PJs.
    Although typically one refers the ends of the rails as end-grain, they might be of mdf, Corian, or tryplay, instead of solid wood, but still this jig would be useful.

    Indeed, these set-up blocks are very useful to quickly adjust the height of router bit, and it is possible to make them at home; besides, you can still use their PDF instructions.

    On the contrary, I am more familiar with woodworking terminology than with that of metalworking, but here we keep on learning.

    Happy Thanksgiving.

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    PJs
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    On the contrary, I am more familiar with woodworking terminology than with that of metalworking, but here we keep on learning.

    Happy Thanksgiving.
    Yes Sir, every day if I can. Hope you had a great Thanksgiving too!
    ~PJ
    ‘‘Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest.’’
    Mark Twain

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    Thanks morsa! We've added your Coping Sled to our Sleds category,
    as well as to your builder page: morsa's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:




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