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Thread: Crosscut Sled

  1. #11

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    Brendon's Tools
    Thanks for your interest in this project.
    Here is a picture of a simple micro-adjuster:
    Crosscut Sled-micro-adjuster.jpg In its simplest form it is a metal bracket drilled and threaded to take a small bolt and fixed behind the free end of the fence. The micro adjustment can be made by turning the bolt a quarter turn and so pushing the fence forward a tiny amount. Note in the picture, the clamp to the right of the adjuster. This is used to hold the fence in place temporarily until calibration is complete, at which time the fence is permanently screwed from underneath and the clamp removed.
    I hope this is helpful.
    Brendon
    If you want to discuss further feel free to private message me.
    Visit my blog at www.waneyedgeworkshop.com

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    Paul Jones (08-18-2017)

  3. #12
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    Paul Jones's Tools
    Brendon,

    The photo to the temporary micro-adjuster is very useful. Your narrative and detailed instructions at your website to the 5th cut method and the dial indicator method are excellent. I own a dial indicator (many) and I think I would prefer using the dial indicator method and then do the 5th cut method (just the width measurements) to double check the accuracy. I did not know the 5th cut method and thank you for instructions.

    Paul Jones

  4. #13
    ncollar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post
    Brendon,

    The photo to the temporary micro-adjuster is very useful. Your narrative and detailed instructions at your website to the 5th cut method and the dial indicator method are excellent. I own a dial indicator (many) and I think I would prefer using the dial indicator method and then do the 5th cut method (just the width measurements) to double check the accuracy. I did not know the 5th cut method and thank you for instructions.

    Paul Jones
    Paul
    The reason in my mind is to qualify your work in making a tool. No tool is worth it weight if it can not have a very high percentage of repeat ability. The fifth cut is to be able to take it to another level. With a machinist they will square up all six sides before making their part. It is about the same here. The new tool has to be proven. I like the procedure and can see how it will show any error. Again a tool is no better that the accuracy it holds. I have never thought to go to this extreme but the proof is in the results.

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    Paul Jones (08-18-2017)

  6. #14

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    Brendon's Tools
    Thanks Paul. The 5th cut method is a lot more cumbersome than the dial indicator method. I would imagine a lot of folk own dial indicators nowadays but from the pedagogical point of view it is worth detailing the 5th cut method. In any case you a right, one method can be used as a check on the other.
    Cheers
    Brendon
    Visit my blog at www.waneyedgeworkshop.com

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    Paul Jones (08-18-2017)

  8. #15

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    Brendon
    That looks really good. I have had one on my table saw for years but yours makes mine look rough. I think yours is probably far more accurate than mine.

  9. #16

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    Brendon's Tools
    Thanks Ozcee,
    I appreciate your interest.
    Brendon
    Visit my blog at www.waneyedgeworkshop.com

  10. #17
    Frank S's Avatar
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    Frank S's Tools
    fascinating. I'm not a wood worker by any means but owning the usual woodworking tools table saw, radial saw, Band-saws, scroll saw, routers, Miter saw, planes chisels and even a wood lathe I appreciate how others do things. I hadn't even thought of a crosscut sled
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

  11. #18

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    Just an awesome sled. Far better than what I am using. Must build myself one or two. One for smaller items and then a larger one for those bigger cuts.

    GeneH.

  12. #19

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    Brendon's Tools
    Hi Frank
    It's well worth putting a little time into making a sled; you won't regret it. It opens up many possibilities with the table saw.
    Brendon
    Visit my blog at www.waneyedgeworkshop.com

  13. #20

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    Brendon's Tools
    That's a good idea. Sometimes a big sled is just too cumbersome for small jobs.
    Brendon
    Visit my blog at www.waneyedgeworkshop.com

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