Free 50 Best Homemade Tools eBook:  
Remove advertisements
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: DELUXE ELECTRIC MELTING POT

  1. #1
    Turboconqueringmegaeagle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Lincolnshire
    Posts
    34
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 66 Times in 19 Posts

    Turboconqueringmegaeagle's Tools

    DELUXE ELECTRIC MELTING POT

    Ive been using heating elements removed from domestic ovens to melt ally for years now but with no temperature control would manage a couple of pours then it would burn out so...... I took an old fire extinguisher into which i placed a stainless steel pipe (80x5x?) with the end capped with the element wound round it and receptical for a k-type thermocouple, back filled with a proprietary blend of pearlite and fire clay and rigged a controll unit on salvaged power socket and lead off a pc power supply.

    Note: I came by a box full of brand new elements from ovens no longer in production so ive had a dozen pours out of this thing so far but only managed a max of 4 pours using used elements that were not controlled, id hate for anyone to cement something in place and have it burn out after the test run.

  2. The Following 12 Users Say Thank You to Turboconqueringmegaeagle For This Useful Post:

    blkadder (03-17-2018), bvd1940 (03-16-2018), Christophe Mineau (09-15-2017), EnginePaul (03-18-2018), Moby Duck (09-14-2017), NickP (03-15-2018), NortonDommi (09-15-2017), rlm98253 (03-15-2018), rossbotics (09-16-2017), Seedtick (09-14-2017), Tule (09-15-2017), will52100 (09-14-2017)

  3. #2

    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    How are you bending the elements? Won't they break

  4. #3
    will52100's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Bassfield, MS
    Posts
    58
    Thanks
    75
    Thanked 29 Times in 14 Posts

    will52100's Tools
    That is very cool. Or hot. Anyway, what are you melting, lead, or aluminum? If your melting aluminum you might look into getting heat treating oven elements, might last longer at high temps than a household oven element, not sure. I do know that heat treating elements are flexible before the first firing, but if you try to bend them after it they will break, nut sure what the difference between them and household oven elements are construction wise.
    courtneyknives.net

  5. #4
    Turboconqueringmegaeagle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Lincolnshire
    Posts
    34
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 66 Times in 19 Posts

    Turboconqueringmegaeagle's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex7512 View Post
    How are you bending the elements? Won't they break
    I straighten them out as best i can then use the pot as a mandrel, if you can make it out, i welded a hook to the pot to restrain the start end, wound the element then welded another hook to prevent it springing open, ive bent up at least a dozen elements like this for various jobs over the last decade and never broken one even if they were not new.

  6. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Turboconqueringmegaeagle For This Useful Post:

    Paul Jones (09-23-2017), will52100 (09-15-2017)

  7. #5
    Turboconqueringmegaeagle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Lincolnshire
    Posts
    34
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 66 Times in 19 Posts

    Turboconqueringmegaeagle's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by will52100 View Post
    That is very cool. Or hot..
    Thanks, have only melted aluminium so far, but no reason i cant wind the controller down a bit and work with lead, like i said, used elements will still work after being manipulated but this is the first time ive hooked one up to a controller and it was brand new so im not sure if my previous attempts failed after a few pours due lack of controller or having been previously used.

  8. #6
    will52100's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Bassfield, MS
    Posts
    58
    Thanks
    75
    Thanked 29 Times in 14 Posts

    will52100's Tools
    Good to know. From what I understand the elements used in kilns and heat treat ovens are soft and flexible until the first firing, then they are brittle. Household ovens may be a tougher design, and it might be used ones had minor cracks after re bending that caused them to fail shortly. Not sure, but it'd be interesting to see how long the new one last. The controller will certainly help it to last longer anyway.
    courtneyknives.net

  9. #7
    whome
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Ithaca, NY
    Posts
    9
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Turboconqueringmegaeagle View Post
    Ive been using heating elements removed from domestic ovens to melt ally for years now but with no temperature control would manage a couple of pours then it would burn out so...... I took an old fire extinguisher into which i placed a stainless steel pipe (80x5x?) with the end capped with the element wound round it and receptical for a k-type thermocouple, back filled with a proprietary blend of pearlite and fire clay and rigged a controll unit on salvaged power socket and lead off a pc power supply.

    Note: I came by a box full of brand new elements from ovens no longer in production so ive had a dozen pours out of this thing so far but only managed a max of 4 pours using used elements that were not controlled, id hate for anyone to cement something in place and have it burn out after the test run.
    Electric heat treat oven heating elements and electric clothes drier elements are all nichrome wire, as are hair driers, bought used at thrift store for a buck or two, I would expect the dryer elements, wound like long springs would be cheapest, due to economy of scale, mass production. They all glow red hot in use, many electric dryers are scrapped because one of the elements burned out, which it does by breaking. I have several times, in the past 60 years, saved a dryer by simply hooking the broken ends together and pinched them with pliers. The low setting puts 120 volts, one side of the 240 v supply, for high, the second element is connected to the other side. The wiring diagram of major appliances are typically in the timer compartment, or under the back cover panel. With a 120 v section of wire, the use of a 15 amp (woodworker's) router variable speed control and a common plug-in watt-meter will serve to control energy input and avoid burnout work to set the optimum heat input, as well as to actually see when the heating element is over powered. Nichrome typically runs red hot and will fail before it gets white hot. Safe operating temperature is 1100 deg. C, melting point is about 1400 deg. C, depending on the alloy.
    google "color temperature chart" for estimating the temperature of the heating element.

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to whome For This Useful Post:

    EnginePaul (03-18-2018)

  11. #8
    Content Editor DIYer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    3,084
    Thanks
    321
    Thanked 621 Times in 562 Posts


    Thanks Turboconqueringmegaeagle! We've added your Electric Melting Pot to our Heating and Cooling category,
    as well as to your builder page: Turboconqueringmegaeagle's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:




  12. #9
    Turboconqueringmegaeagle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Lincolnshire
    Posts
    34
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 66 Times in 19 Posts

    Turboconqueringmegaeagle's Tools
    I always save dead power tools, but the thought of taking the speed controller and hooking it up to an element had not crossed my mind. one reason i was keen to invest in the digital temp. control is i can now hook it up to any number of other devices i build.
    The Ni chrome wire is exciting stuff, ive been toying with the idea of a desktop foundry, no practical application whatsoever, just for fun, expect it will utilise a hair dryer now thanks!

  13. #10
    Jon
    Jon is offline Jon has agreed the Seller's Terms of Service
    Administrator Jon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Colorado, USA
    Posts
    12,314
    Thanks
    2,223
    Thanked 2,838 Times in 1,265 Posts
    Congratulations Turboconqueringmegaeagle - your Electric Melting Pot is the Homemade Tool of the Week!

    Some nice entries this week: Vintage Motorcycle Taps and Dies by olderdan, a 1" Drill Guide by Frank S, a Tailstock Die Holder by Canobi, a Bowie Knife by olderdan, a Centroid Error Checking Method by rgsparber, and a Drill Guard by Tuomas. We also saw two other projects from Turboconqueringmegaeagle, including a Chainsaw Carving Disc, and some Heavy Lifting Dollies. And we saw an interesting Maker's Vise with accompanying Kickstarter campaign, that I've backed on behalf of HomemadeTools.net.


    Turboconqueringmegaeagle - we've added your tool entry to our All Homemade Tool of the Week winners post. And, you'll now notice the wrench-on-pedestal award in the awards showcase in your postbit, visible beneath your username:



    You'll be receiving a $25 online gift card, in your choice of Amazon, PayPal, or bitcoin. Please PM me your current email address and gift card choice and I'll get it sent over right away.


    Congratulations and well done!


    Post your reply!
    Join 33,912 of us and get our 50 Must Read Homemade Tools eBook free.



    50 Must Read Homemade Tools

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •