Free 173 Best Homemade Tools eBook:  
Remove advertisements
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 15 of 15

Thread: Die Filer

  1. #11
    Toolmaker51's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Posts
    1,088
    Thanks
    2,308
    Thanked 1,097 Times in 617 Posts

    Toolmaker51's Tools
    Commercial die-filers run slow, about 40-60 strokes per minute. As they use rigid files cutting on the down stroke, you get a good and very controllable rate of removal; often splitting scribed layout lines for a die. The frantic cutting mentioned isn't so noticeable in lower density materials.
    While a speed control won't operate the scroll saw motor, I'll bet a change of sheave diameters [even stepped] can do the trick. Or, how about a sewing machine motor?
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

  2. #12
    scrdmgl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    24
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 37 Times in 15 Posts

    scrdmgl's Tools

    Die Filer

    Quote Originally Posted by Toolmaker51 View Post
    Commercial die-filers run slow, about 40-60 strokes per minute. As they use rigid files cutting on the down stroke, you get a good and very controllable rate of removal; often splitting scribed layout lines for a die. The frantic cutting mentioned isn't so noticeable in lower density materials.
    While a speed control won't operate the scroll saw motor, I'll bet a change of sheave diameters [even stepped] can do the trick. Or, how about a sewing machine motor?
    Hi Toolmaker:
    My version of a Die Filer was a proof of concept exercise that is basically sound in unmodified form. The reason for that, is that is meant for following a scribed line with precision and ease of use. Real Die Filers, are unfortunately not in fashion anymore, being replaced by other methods for that purpose. I haven't posted a follow up article about it, but I found a way to use a model file as shown in my original design directly attached to the arms of the saw. After finding an adequate file within the required length, the flat end of it can be drilled with a carbide drill of the required size for the attaching screw, and since the flat part of the file is shorter than the needed stroke length, the round file handle can be held by a simple fabricated adapter obviating the two piece construction of the file+backing plate. Despite the relatively high speed cycle, the forces involved in the filing action are minimal, specially for finishing purposes,. However, your suggestion of a speed controllable sewing machine motor, might prove to be the easiest ticket to the high stroke speed. I'll start a web search of a motor/speed controller unit, to see what's available and the cost of it.
    As an added bit of info, I'm constantly buying stuff on the web and found that if you are not pressed for time, buying directly from China or other such place that offers what you need, is the best option. Local suppliers will sell you the same product at two or more times the price offered by this method, very often with free shipping. After all, even the bread that we eat in Canada is made in freaking China, well, almost. hahaha
    If you wish, we can correspond by email, my address is [email protected]

    Regards

    Jorge

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    44
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 26 Times in 11 Posts
    What is the amplitude of the blade movement please?

  4. #14
    Toolmaker51's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Posts
    1,088
    Thanks
    2,308
    Thanked 1,097 Times in 617 Posts

    Toolmaker51's Tools
    re: Amplitude of die filers.
    My commercial file is 3/4" of travel, and have worked dies 2" thick. Unless very fine cut files are used, that is excessive for thin work; does more sawing than filing. I made a brass filigree once, encountering a lot of trouble...
    If I was to build a filer, adjustable stroke is the most important feature.
    Motor speed is next, then a tilting table. Tilt is needed for inlay work and back clearance on dies.
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    84
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 41 Times in 28 Posts
    If your scroll saw has a motor that is separated from the "up and down" blade gearbox it may be practical to use an electric drill, especially variable speed to drive it. You may have to contrive a driveshaft that can be tightened in the drill chuck to hold the pulley or coupling as well as a separate start/stop switch. The beauty of this is that used corded electric drills are dirt cheap or you can buy a cheap import like Harbor Freight. A bolt with the head cut off can serve this shaft adapter function. A solid mount for an electric hand drill is best cobbled up out of wood and a couple of long screw clamps being careful to not block the air cooling openings on the drill body. Ed Weldon


    Post your reply!
    Join 33,912 of us and get our 173 Must Read Homemade Tools eBook free.



    173 Must Read Homemade Tools

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •