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Thread: Different type of shaft key (Dutch Key)

  1. #11
    thehomeengineer's Avatar
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    I am not sure what the standard name for this fixing is now. I guess we could give it an international standard via homemadetools. Any ideas please post (funnier the better)
    The Home Engineer

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    [email protected] tonyfoale's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rasta View Post
    Hi Tony; I have fitted many of them to shafts in the industry, here in OZ are called Scotch keys?
    Scotch key. Now that rings a bell, must be my Ozzie upbringing.

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    Hi All
    This post via Wikipedia explains all about different types of keys:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Key_(engineering)

    I also saw this on the web:Dutch Pins: How To? - Page 3

    A "Scotch key" or "Dutch key" also provides a keyway not by milling but by drilling axially into the part and the shaft, so that a round key can be used. If the key is tapered, it is referred to as a "Dutch pin" and is driven in, and generally cut off flush with the end of the shaft. A Hirth joint is similar to a Spline joint but with the teeth on the butt of the shaft instead of on the surface.

    Now I'm curious. I can see "scotch key" meaning "cheap-ass key" but I'm wondering where "dutch" comes from.

    -Roland McPhearson (Cheap-ass)
    So it appears they are both correct. You never stop learning!
    The Home Engineer
    Last edited by thehomeengineer; 01-16-2018 at 07:16 AM. Reason: Edit text

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    I believe 'dutch' might mean practical but workmanlike, alternative method. Once, I had double-hung window sills to replace that had decayed. Upper surface was OK, underside was splintered and ragged. A carpenter told me, make a "dutchman". Unstable pine wood was pared down to solid material by 4" power-saw, chisel and bullnose plane. Then replaced with poplar, then contours were shaped and painted like original. A little tedious working upside down, back in 1981. They are still in place, indistinguishable from original.

    I'm not Scottish, but know a few...they are not the stereotypical cheap, they just get a lot of bang for the buck. And unlike some cultures, their products are first rate. True cheapskates don't do that!


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