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Thread: Door restrainer

  1. #1
    garage nut's Avatar
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    Door restrainer

    With the windy season starting I needed to put a latch on the workshop door and did not want to go out and buy something .

    Found a very short hook and soon established that I would not be able to hook it into the conventional eye you get with this type of hook



    My solution. Drill a hole through the locking bolts tab

    Door restrainer-aa-door.jpg


    I did turn that picture the correct way before saving and posting it

    Door restrainer-aa-door-landscape.jpg

    Even made it landscape shaped....It still jumps 90 deg
    Last edited by garage nut; 07-05-2018 at 05:24 AM.

  2. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to garage nut For This Useful Post:

    ranald (07-03-2018), Seedtick (07-02-2018)

  3. #2
    Frank S's Avatar
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    Pictures sometimes have a mind of their own when posting them. A lot depends on the width versus height ratio.
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

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    Nice work. Hope your winds are not as severe as ours or your brick is cactus. Guess those are solid bricks in SA where trees are few except 4 all the olive tree weeds.

    Cheers,

    Ranald

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    garage nut's Avatar
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    Solid bricks...2Kg each ask me I laid every one of them..

    Port Elizabeth is known as the "Windy City" here in South Africa.

    Great for Kite Surfing

  6. #5
    ranald's Avatar
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    That is what I thought. Also known for great white fish. Have you seen the bricks in Thailand? they look lihe small ice creams that fit into the palm of your hand: I forget the name or those. Glad we "got over" the wire cut face bricks of the late 60's & 70's that ripped your hands as you threw them to another work mate(guess they found a better product for the silica:a chip off the old brick. LOL)

    Cheers

  7. #6
    garage nut's Avatar
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    We use a lot of cement bricks here as well. Due to the fact that they have almost the same expansion coefficient as steel and with Our fairly large temperature shifts between summer (45 Deg) and winter (0 Deg) here at the coast even more severe inland, that is important to prevent cracks when combining the building materials.

    My point was the cent bricks are also heavy on the hands. 2 sets of gloves to move 1000 bricks from ground level to the next.

    Door restrainer-aa-first-floor.jpg

    Did it all myself with one or 2 guys to help with mixing and holding

    Again one of this pics that falls over by itself, hopefully not my building

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    ranald (07-04-2018)

  9. #7
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    Sounds like your building/home would withstand cyclones/tornados. I used to labour for brickies on weekends (had three jobs to repay a debt, cleaning at night and admin during weekdays) and would destroy a pair of short welding leather gloves each weekend.I learnt quickly to get the "mud" mix right. On my first day, as I started on the top floor of a highset and throwing the mix up to the mud boards needed the perfect ratio:too sloppy & I would need to clean the wall below as well as myself & too dry; it would stick to the long handled shovel in midair or go "karplonk onto the previous mix. I was pretty fit keeping 3 brickies going: mixing mud & throwing bricks & cleaning & raking/round jointing etc. Very good LIFE-LESSON.
    3 sizes of Concrete blocks are common here but not concrete bricks: these are as rare as my house's mega bricks ( I didn't build this one like the previous two).
    I have probs with portrait pics when posting to "gumtree" : I spin them into landscape & somehow they flick back to portrait but on the side.
    Do you get the humidity with the higher temps (above 35). We get 90 to 100 % humidity with our higher temps & it is a Bcow.
    THANKS FOR POSTING

    Rgds
    Ranald

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    philipUsesWood&Brass's Avatar
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    Ranold, I was a "Hoddy" making gunite swimming pools when I was young ... My Plaster had similar requirements: And back then One of them was met by adding "loose Asbestus" so it would be slick and smooth upon troweling it. Fortunately, I did Not have throw it on to "Hocks" (Mud Boards to your use) I simply wheeled it to the pool and DUMPED IT!

    We did use Hocks to create the Tile bed, and I usually mixed that in the wheel Barrel, not our Purpose Built Plaster Mixer. That was only for White Marble Sand & White Portland Cement a 5:3 Mix+ 1/2 bag Asbestus. RIGHT at the end of that job, the OSHA regulations Banned ALL use of Asbestus.

    philip

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  12. #9
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    Hi Philip,
    It's interesting that asbestos was banned here for building products(80's i think) but was still used extensively in car clutches, brake linings, and whipper snipper/ brush cutter clutches for about another 20 years. Mechanics & tyre changers would blow out the brakes into clouds of dust containing asbestos. Property/parks mtce folk would have the brush cutter motors around & about their head & manufacturs seemed more involved in reducing noise levels to about 86 decibels to satisfy the occupational health demands.
    Another overlooked health issue was fibreglass & concrete dust. I did work for a fibreglasser: I had to tow the trailer boats home as he didn't have room on his 3 acre property-LOL) who I later learned wouldn't be around "the dust" and had me cut the boats with a grinder until repairable. I then learned that power tools warrenty was not recognised if f'glass or cement dust was/were evident in a broken tool.

    Stay well
    Ranald

  13. #10
    garage nut's Avatar
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    Humidity not so bad here, more up North/East region is Called Natal and the biggest city is Durban.

    Thanks for that part on the mud. You had me rolling and tears in my eyes with laughter...The same here

    We also use cement block here about the size of 1.5 bricks long and 2 high. Here I used then for a vegie pad.

    Door restrainer-aa-blocks.jpg

    In winter I cover it with thick plastic sheeting.

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