Free 173 Best Homemade Tools eBook:  
Remove advertisements
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 16 of 16

Thread: A double edged fly cutter.

  1. #11
    ncollar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    264
    Thanks
    20
    Thanked 117 Times in 86 Posts
    Tony
    Very nice, I making one from some 1 inch cold roll, it's 5 inches in diameter with a shaft heat shrink in place, I just found what I'm going to use for a cutter. A nice big fly are nice to grab and mow it nice and flat. As soon as I can I'll post pictures.
    NelsonA double edged fly cutter.-img_20180110_125801%5B1%5D.jpg
    Last edited by ncollar; 03-21-2018 at 07:41 PM. Reason: correction

  2. #12
    Woodgeezr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    36
    Thanked 16 Times in 1 Post
    thanks. where did you find the R8 to chuck mounting flange?

  3. #13
    [email protected] tonyfoale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    482
    Thanks
    206
    Thanked 789 Times in 251 Posts

    tonyfoale's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by Woodgeezr View Post
    thanks. where did you find the R8 to chuck mounting flange?
    Probably from Discount Machine (Shars) on eBay.

  4. #14
    [email protected] tonyfoale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    482
    Thanks
    206
    Thanked 789 Times in 251 Posts

    tonyfoale's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by ncollar View Post
    Tony
    Very nice, I making one from some 1 inch cold roll, it's 5 inches in diameter with a shaft heat shrink in place, I just found what I'm going to use for a cutter. A nice big fly are nice to grab and mow it nice and flat.
    Nothing like some decent inertia. Good luck with it.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Nice tool! I'm sure i will make one myself.
    Thanks for charing!

  6. #16
    Toolmaker51's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Posts
    1,013
    Thanks
    2,178
    Thanked 1,040 Times in 577 Posts

    Toolmaker51's Tools
    I'll reiterate my comment on setting multiple bits, in cutters that hold bit and allow adjustment, unlike insert tooling.
    Very first, inertia is what makes flycutting work. Increased mass propels the cutter and reduces deflection as cutter enters. Not degrading the smaller commercial style bodies, they have a place too.
    But first, let this image form...When setting something like engine valves, those surfaces are comparatively smooth and broad, even oily and a gauge slides easily between.
    A double fly cutter most often carries tools two different radii from the body centerline, but same radius at two different heights works too. Either way, interpret what follows with that in mind.
    Touching off a first cut's easiest when feeler gauges are used. Instead of just one though, in the traditional sense, use two.
    The sharp point of a cutter understandably doesn't offer the same 'feel' as lashing valve trains. The bit is certain to scratch or grab the leaf with the tiniest increase of pressure. With two leaves, moving only the lower leaf now slides in a far smoother manner, isolated from the sharp cutter. Let's use .010 and .003 as the slip as example, though the total isn't important. I like the .003 being just thick enough to push not bending immediately when clearance is borderline.
    Now, set the second cutter, typically the finisher first.
    Next combine one leaf [.010] with a different thickness, perhaps .008, in accordance with amount desired to rough with the leading cutter.
    Add the gauge thicknesses of first pair involved [= .013], raise the knee or lower quill that amount minus [-] .001.
    If your tactile sense is good you'll be .001 above the material. I often take a trial pass to insure visibly the surface is parallel with cutter plane. Marking with dye isn't a bad idea. It'll reveal uncut portions if RPM and feed rate aren't proportionally moderated.
    Whether skimming minimally or registering dials for more aggressive removal, it's going to be far closer to predict intended remaining material.
    There are tendencies to run excess RPM, shallow cuts and too slow feed rate. One clue is material re-welding itself instead being swept away - the small chip subject to more heat than it can dissipate. Coolant with fly cutting tends to be messy!


    Post your reply!
    Join 33,912 of us and get our 173 Must Read Homemade Tools eBook free.



    173 Must Read Homemade Tools
    Last edited by Toolmaker51; 07-21-2018 at 06:10 PM. Reason: missing text, again...fire that proofreader!
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to Toolmaker51 For This Useful Post:

    PJs (07-22-2018)

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •