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Thread: Dremel fan

  1. #11
    johnclark's Avatar
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    Thanks for the great information and advice.

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    tom petersoin (03-11-2016)

  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by mklotz View Post
    Those chucks make good pin vises, too...



    The thread on the Dremel spindle is 40 tpi so it's easy to make one on the lathe. Bore out the tube so it can be used to hold long stuff. Add, as I did, a removable spinner and away you go.
    Marv,
    I'd KILL to be able to make one of those!!!! My Unimats would be GREATER with such a tool to hold a Dremel Mini 3 jaw chuck, and with that thread you did, would ALSO hold the Dremel Collet nut and if center drilled would hold the collets too!!!!

    I don't have the tooling to make such a thing, what ya charge me for just the shaft to hold the Dremel chuck, (tube, with the same threads), I can do all the rest, I just can't turn the threads on the outside, I don't have the proper tooling for my Unimats (either of them), to do so!

  4. #13
    mklotz mklotz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hemi View Post
    Marv,
    I'd KILL to be able to make one of those!!!! My Unimats would be GREATER with such a tool to hold a Dremel Mini 3 jaw chuck, and with that thread you did, would ALSO hold the Dremel Collet nut and if center drilled would hold the collets too!!!!

    I don't have the tooling to make such a thing, what ya charge me for just the shaft to hold the Dremel chuck, (tube, with the same threads), I can do all the rest, I just can't turn the threads on the outside, I don't have the proper tooling for my Unimats (either of them), to do so!
    Nothing personal, Hemi, but I gave up on making things for folks a long time ago, whether for money or not.

    Is there a model club in your area? (BTW, you should put your location in your profile so it shows below your avatar). Often club folks are willing to help out a fellow member.

    The other alternative is one of the maker-spaces popping up all over the country. Again, depends on your location but many of them have thread-cutting lathes available for use.

    If you have a Unimat you already have a chuck much better than the Dremel chuck. The one that came with my Unimat closes to zero and has negligible runout. As for collets, the WW spindle available for the Unimat, while pricey, will give you better accuracy and a wider choice of collet sizes than you could ever get with Dremel tool-holding collets.
    ---
    Regards, Marv


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  5. #14
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    Well thats just it, the 3 jaw chucks I have, one does turn closed to zero, the other one, does not. one came with the SL1000, and the other came with the DB200............. BUT, the issue is in my case size..... The Dremel 3 jaw chuck as well as the Dremel collects would allow me to get closer at angles then the full-on tools to the machine would with the machine backed off a bit to allow angle space........... make sense?

    I have yet to go around and fill in my profile an all.... thats what ya get rushing into what all seems interesting, and forget the little stuff LOL

  6. #15

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    Magic set of posts in so many ways.

    The fan is a great idea and hopefully someone with far more practical offspring than mine will be able to get them to design a 3D printer version of the fan for general use. At my age I am not going to even attempt to learn 3D CAD because ten years ago 2D was beyond me. There is a person who sells odds and sods in the local market who will 3d print anything for a modest price - he bought the printer before learning how to do the CAD work and got as lost as I did on that but he says that there are thousands of ready to make projects on line on places like Instructables (who provided the downloads for a couple of things for me). He did a quick look this morning for me and did not find a Dremel fan.

    I had no idea the Milwaukee dremel existed even tho I have a lot of other Milwaukee tools. I agree their batteries are great, not like some other brands where they only last months at best and die if used when the temperature exceeds about 35-40C (and we get plenty of that). Taking a new Rockwell drill on the roof to repair storm damage on a 35C day and finding both the batteries totally dead and unrecoverable before the job is done was not amusing. My Milwaukee batteries have already lasted well over a year and are showing no signs of age (I probably just jinxed myself) tho admittedly they have not lain on a hot tin roof. Yesterday was 40+ and today is also forecast at 40C.
    Last edited by Mi Tasol; 02-12-2018 at 03:08 PM.

  7. #16
    mklotz mklotz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mi Tasol View Post
    Magic set of posts in so many ways.

    The fan is a great idea and hopefully someone with far more practical offspring than mine will be able to get them to design a 3D printer version of the fan for general use. At my age I am not going to even attempt to learn 3D CAD because ten years ago 2D was beyond me. There is a person who sells odds and sods in the local market who will 3d print anything for a modest price - he bought the printer before learning how to do the CAD work and got as lost as I did on that but he says that there are thousands of ready to make projects on line on places like Instructables (who provided the downloads for a couple of things for me). He did a quick look this morning for me and did not find a Dremel fan.

    I had no idea the Milwaukee dremel existed even tho I have a lot of other Milwaukee tools. I agree their batteries are great, not like some other brands where they only last months at best and die if used when the temperature exceeds about 35-40C (and we get plenty of that). Taking a new Rockwell drill on the roof to repair storm damage on a 35C day and finding both the batteries totally dead and unrecoverable before the job is done was not amusing. My Milwaukee batteries have already lasted well over a year and are showing no signs of age (I probably just jinxed myself) tho admittedly they have not lain on a hot tin roof. Yesterday was 40+ and today is also forecast at 40C.
    For heaven's sake, you don't need CAD and a plastic sprayer to make one of those fans. Just take a plastic disk, make a hole in it to friction fit the chuck, lay out some blades by eye and start filing. The number of blades is unimportant and they needn't be identical. It's not a precision device.
    ---
    Regards, Marv


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  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mi Tasol View Post
    Magic set of posts in so many ways.

    The fan is a great idea and hopefully someone with far more practical offspring than mine will be able to get them to design a 3D printer version of the fan for general use. At my age I am not going to even attempt to learn 3D CAD because ten years ago 2D was beyond me. There is a person who sells odds and sods in the local market who will 3d print anything for a modest price - he bought the printer before learning how to do the CAD work and got as lost as I did on that but he says that there are thousands of ready to make projects on line on places like Instructables (who provided the downloads for a couple of things for me). He did a quick look this morning for me and did not find a Dremel fan.

    I had no idea the Milwaukee dremel existed even tho I have a lot of other Milwaukee tools. I agree their batteries are great, not like some other brands where they only last months at best and die if used when the temperature exceeds about 35-40C (and we get plenty of that). Taking a new Rockwell drill on the roof to repair storm damage on a 35C day and finding both the batteries totally dead and unrecoverable before the job is done was not amusing. My Milwaukee batteries have already lasted well over a year and are showing no signs of age (I probably just jinxed myself) tho admittedly they have not lain on a hot tin roof. Yesterday was 40+ and today is also forecast at 40C.
    Sorry to say but "Dremel" isn't a Milwaukee tool..... Dremel is owned by Bosch tool......

  9. #18

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    Gad, I hate to sound like a safety Nazi, but have you considered the possibility of spraying flesh and blood on your face and project with a powerful rotary tool having a high speed fan with exposed, sharp-cornered blades very close to the hand grip tapered toward the fan? I think the Dremel shroud is not so much for fan ducting as for a modicum of safety. Better to experience a friction burn than a bloody wound. Consider also the possibility that the initial contact with the fan would drag the hand into closer proximity to the blades as, does a circular saw, rather than thrusting it away. Of course, I realize that the saw typically has a much more aggressive hook angle than the fan, but I would not like to be the one to experiment. And the fan IS drawing from the rear and blowing out the front.

    I like the fan concept, but perhaps a little more effort in fabrication would be worthwhile. Like starting fabrication by drilling a series of holes an appropriate angle just inside the periphery of the disk and Dremelling(?) them out to an aerodynamic shape, leaving a smooth shroud around the blade tips.


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