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Thread: A Drill Metal Cutter

  1. #11
    labhras773's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank S View Post
    Now for a little explanation For this model I felt that should anyone desire to make one of these tools I designed it so that it would be within the realm of even the most modestly equipped home shops the arbor being one possible exception
    However even that can be made without special tools by using a threaded rod a few nuts and washers and a spacer bushing to fit the rod and the pillow-block bearing.
    the rest could be just about any materials on hand like hard wood
    The mount for the drill is purposely made from hard wood this way it can be cut and shaped to fit the drill easily
    either model has its merits depending on the user's requirement
    in the mounting of the drill I left this a bit vague most drills made today have a front handle mount just behind the chuck even full plastic models have a rudimentary forward protrusion that could have a clamp around them. back in the hand grip area the wooden mount should fit securely or be shimmed to fit other than that both models are pretty straight forward any sizing would have to be up to the builder
    I hope this offers some insight on a way to accomplish the build using a common hand drill.
    One more thing if someone were to look at this in another plane the drill mount could serve as a very light duty mill but it would require a more substantial pillow block bearing
    Or it could even be converted into a small lathe
    Hi Frank S, Thank you for doing all of this, it's like you read my mind. This is the sort of thing that I had in my head. Something that could be built relatively cheap and not too engineered but safe. The chop-saw maybe further on down the line, but I think in January I'm going to work on a stationary push-thru type as you posted on Nov 10.
    Again, many thanks for sharing and for your advice & knowledge.
    Larry

  2. #12

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    DanLins's Tools
    I agree with the comments above, and would stress concerns with the side loading of an electric drill as well as lack of sufficient rpm's to do an acceptable job. Rather than go to all this trouble, I think I'd keep an eye out at yard sales, Craigslist, etc., to find a real cutoff saw. I have a 14" cutoff saw which rarely sees use anymore, since I've pretty much gone over to using thin cutoff (0.046") wheels on my handheld angle grinder. Sometimes I use a metal straightedge clamped to the work piece if having a straight finish cut is important. I will admit that it takes time and patience to do long cuts through larger than 1/4" plate, but I don't do enough of this type cutting to spend upwards of $1K for a decent plasma cutter.

    Dan Linscheid

  3. #13

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    Will the drill motor run at a high enough rpm to be efficient cutting with an abrasive blade?

  4. #14

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    DanLins's Tools
    I'd guess it may depend on the thickness and type of material you are cutting. Thinner material may cut fine, but this just seems like a lot of work for a fairly limited usability. That being said, if all you have more time than money, it may be an answer, but I would be surprised if you are happy cutting over 1/8" of mild steel with this process.

    Dan Linscheid

  5. #15
    will52100's Avatar
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    will52100's Tools
    It'll work, but will be slow and will wear out the drill's bearings rather quickly. I don't know your financial situation, but I'd take a look at Harbor Freight's mini chop saw. 2 in. Mini Bench Top Cut-Off Saw It's not very heavy duty, but if your cutting model train size pieces of aluminum and brass and thin steel it'd likely do the trick.

    Or you could do a table saw style set up with pillow block bearings, a separate motor and pulleys. I have used a washing machine motor in the past for a disk sander, though the wiring was a PITA and I had to hand start it.

  6. #16

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    You might want to use a variation of Frank S great drawings and just make a mini saw table of aluminum. At any rate,a side load of the disc, is to be avoided at all cost. If you are around a Harbor Freight, I would advise you to first purchase a face shield. Then go look at their mini table saw, and just see how it is built. this should give you some idea as to how to build a light duty saw. They also have small saw blades for about $4.oo that may be more strong, and longer lasting. At any rate they also carry the cut off disc. If you have an air compressor they often have the die grinder on sale for $9.00. this would save your drill from the side load.

  7. #17

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    wizard69's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by DanLins View Post
    I'd guess it may depend on the thickness and type of material you are cutting. Thinner material may cut fine, but this just seems like a lot of work for a fairly limited usability. That being said, if all you have more time than money, it may be an answer, but I would be surprised if you are happy cutting over 1/8" of mild steel with this process.

    Dan Linscheid
    In most cases, with abrasive cut off wheels, you want to operate at a fairly fast RPM. No drill will get you there.

    Fairly simple abrasive cutoff saws have been made however out of 4.5" grinders. Since you can get a cheap Chinese grinder for a few bucks that can handle cut off duty this might be a better approach. Yes it means paying for a grinder and a bit of modification to the tool design but you will get the RPM you need for abrasive cut off.


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