Free 173 Best Homemade Tools eBook:  
Remove advertisements
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Getting started woodworking- what can I build with these motors?

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Getting started woodworking- what can I build with these motors?

    What would these pumps be best for? 2hp 1ph 115/130v. Are these too powerful for disc sanders? Would these be good for a band saw? Any good ideas that would suit these motors? I have at least 3 or 4. They were used for centrifugal pumps. Thanks
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Getting started woodworking- what can I build with these motors?-img_20160406_065947_584.jpg  

  2. #2
    C-Bag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    California, central coast
    Posts
    720
    Thanks
    689
    Thanked 829 Times in 466 Posts

    C-Bag's Tools
    Wow, lucky you! For what it's worth(and you are getting it free) I don't see hp as the limitation if you build or modify SAFELY. Good frames with proper guards all done right will mean you'll have quality equipment. Most manufacturers make their equipment as "economically" as possible. Smaller motors are cheaper. These are quality industrial motors that are made for harsh environments which means they are perfect for a dusty environment like a wood shop. Speaking of which. One of the first things I'd make or modify would be a dust collector. Not only is it a mess and a fire hazard it's horrible for your lungs.

    Where I see your challenges will be in mounting and speed. Flange mount is not seen as much in the home shop equipment and not everything runs at 3400rpm, so you'll have to check your speeds.

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to C-Bag For This Useful Post:

    Cjm_258 (04-06-2016)

  4. #3

    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Thanks, I wasn't planning on having a dust collector, but you talked me into it.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to Cjm_258 For This Useful Post:

    C-Bag (04-06-2016)

  6. #4
    C-Bag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    California, central coast
    Posts
    720
    Thanks
    689
    Thanked 829 Times in 466 Posts

    C-Bag's Tools
    One of the best projects I ever did for myself was make a cyclone for my shop vac. I don't do much woodwork but I do use the grinder to take off rust and powdercoat. Both things that are horrible for the lungs. And especially powdercoat will clog a filter in a shop vac in a heartbeat. And those filters are expensive! But after making the cyclone off ideas I found on the net out of 8" duct parts from Home Depot, 2" pvc and a 5 gal bucket I get years out of my filters and it's way easier on the vac. And waaaaay better than one of those bag type dust collectors you see in woodworking catalogs. Fairly cheap to make too.

  7. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to C-Bag For This Useful Post:

    Cjm_258 (04-06-2016), Jon (04-06-2016)

  8. #5

    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Yea I have seen those before, great idea. Thanks

  9. #6
    C-Bag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    California, central coast
    Posts
    720
    Thanks
    689
    Thanked 829 Times in 466 Posts

    C-Bag's Tools
    Sorry if you know all this.

    What's not immediately apparent with the cyclone/vac setup is its efficiency over one of those dust collectors. Everything that's sucked up with a dust collector goes through the fan blades. So they get caked and worn and lose efficiency. Then there's the way the dust collector body is set up. It's usually big with no taper and the filter(bag)is exposed to the swirling dust.

    In a cyclone the vacuum tube comes in from the top and goes somewhere about 3/5's the way down. And the inlet comes in at an angle even with top /side of the cyclone,this spins the dust fast and as it goes down the tapered side it gets even faster making the dust even as fine as powdercoat separate out then fall in the bottom of the bucket. And because the vac is after the cyclone it is pulling on clean air. It is really old tech that I saw the big ones sitting outside of shops all my life and never gave them any thought until I fell down the rabbit hole of trying to save my vac filters from getting clogged with powdercoat dust. Meanwhile along come Dyson and makes a mint selling you his "new tech".

    I've been meaning to post some pix of my setup and don't know if there would be any interest.

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to C-Bag For This Useful Post:

    Cjm_258 (04-07-2016)

  11. #7

    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Yes I would be interested in seeing your set up. I'm convinced I need one now. I just discovered my little table saw has a port. Thanks

  12. #8
    David Hair's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    6
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    What would really be interesting would be put one in a box and put my address on it. LOL

    David Hair

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to David Hair For This Useful Post:

    Cjm_258 (04-07-2016)

  14. #9

    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    That would be interesting.. For maybe $200 plus shipping

  15. #10
    David Hair's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    6
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    I hear you. I have just about converted all the machines in my shop to 90V DC motors. All but my compressor. Thanks for the offer, I be just jesting.

    David Hair

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •