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Thread: Help!!!

  1. #21
    Frank S's Avatar
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    I have learned to never assume a person knows how to do something until I see them do it. Nor do I assume they do not have skills training or experience either.
    I can only hope that if a person does not that they will seek out someone who has done a similar act before no matter the simplicity or complexity of the project.
    In his first post I noted that he was just unsure about how to make sure it was square. I jumped on the doing the build up repair technique instead of cutting it off and replacing it. which actually can induce far less stress into the spindle than one who has never done one would believe. However after seeing the picture I feel that he will be better off cutting the spindle off whether or not the rear end is removed from the vehicle to make the repair will have to rest on his confidence to make a proper weld in place. for me it would be a moot question I've spent more than my share of time at the 6 o'clock position welding on a critical part under heavy equipment, that sucker would be drug out from under the truck and placed on waist high stands where I could get to it easy and would probably even roll it as I welded it. I'd have that thing cut apart then either repair and machine the spindle back to new then return it to the housing, or preferably replace the spindle with a donated spindle if one could be had,a have it ready for someone to put the rear end back under the truck with my number stamped on the tube near the weld. Again as you stated it does take a particular skill set, and there will never be a replacement for experience. Until they have done a task for themselves all of the training in the world is nothing more than a base guideline.
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
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  2. #22

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    Frank:

    I tried to keep my response as generalized as possible, because in Canada it is getting more and more difficult for the 'backyard' mechanic to be able to do anything on a vehicle. I can see it may end up somewhat like the aviation industry - you will not be able to modify a vehicle in any way, shape, or form, without the signature of a licensed mechanic or a mechanical engineer.

    The autobody industry is already at that point - if any insurance company writes a vehicle off, no one but a certified body mechanic can salvage it and put it back on the road. There is even a notation that gets added to that serial number stating that it has been salvaged.

    The complexities of computers - as many as 20 on some of the newer models - also makes it more difficult for a 'backyard' mechanic - unless they are willing to invest in the diagnostic tools that will allow them to troubleshoot an electronic defect indication.

    But for all the above reasons - LIABILITY will be the biggest deterrent to anyone trying to maintain their vehicle. Even now I am exceeding careful about what work I am willing to undertake - no one but close relatives and people I have known for a long time. Gone are the days when we could do a quick once over and sign off an insurance inspection. Here we cannot even build a trailer without taking it to an approved inspection center for certification and a license plate, plus up to $400.00.
    The government is just taking all the fun out of working on your own stuff.

    There - that is my lament.
    Nixrox

  3. #23
    Frank S's Avatar
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    Nixrox; I hear you.
    having spent many of my 60+ years of my life working in developing and 3rd world countries I've seen a lot of changes come down the pike. During my 10 years in Kuwait I set up several factories. For my own factory there I went to the trouble to get it ISO9001-2000 compliant then later certified. By doing this I quite literally forced some huge out of the region structural engineering firms to at least take a look at our manufacturing capabilities as opposed to having their contracts made in the EU or the USA then imported to the Middle East. Plus when it came to Freight elevators My company was the only one with full ministry approval even huge elevator manufactures like Otis would contract our company to manufacture part of the structures they sold there. we were a small company that grew into what ever size needed when needed and I usually had 10 to 20 of our company's junior engineers attending my Saturday morning planning conferences.
    Upon returning to the states I found it was a mere shadow of itself. I decided that I would be happier to just retire from that aspect of my life and go back to doing the things that I really loved, doing a little job shop work when I want to and more importantly IF I wanted to. my wife and I thought about us retiring to Australia where I used to own some land then I could have taken a professorship at my University in NZ but I've had my fill that stuff as well.
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
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    Jon (10-16-2015)

  5. #24

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    Frank:

    I am on the far side of 60. It seems like we both spent our 40's and 50's in our 'GROWTH' years. I setup and operated 2 airlines one running passengers and cargo between Canada and Russia and another just cargo between Canada and Vietnam/Hong Kong. Then I had a heart scare and that forced me to look at something with a whole lot less stress. I chose teaching and playing with my 8 grandchildren. I also putter around with auto mechanical projects and NDT consulting with people I have known for many years.
    Life is good and I really appreciate the time I spend with family.

    My father on the other hand just took the engine off his Cessna 172 (designed in the 1940's 180hp) and put on a Corvette LS3 430hp fuel injected turbocharged monster engine. I have not witnessed him take it off the lake, but he says it only takes about 100 feet before he is airborne. Keeping in mind he is 88 years old.

    I don't think I want to do anything quite like that.
    nixrox

  6. #25

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    I do appreciate the info and the concern... With all that being said I am a licenced mechanic and a 3rd year apprentice welder... I do understand the legalities and the risks involved in any kind of repair work done to anything much less than critical components... I do have the skill and knowledge required to do complex repairs.. This one was just a case of shit happens.. If I do have any serious concerns about appropriate course of action it is as simple as asking a question to the correct people

  7. #26

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    Nixrox. Just a statement to scare you... I am in alberta as well. So not so many thousands of miles away

  8. #27

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    Why am I not surprised? Well that means everything I said previously has taken on a lot more relevance. I achieved journeyman aircraft mechanic status in 1970. I got my Journeyman Auto Mechanic license in 1975. I got my NDT industrial Radiography and Ultrasonic certification in 1978. I have owned and operated my own NDT inspection and consulting companies since 1984. I have conducted failure analysis on thousands of breakdowns and explosions. So I am speaking from a position of experience gained through the school of hard knocks. I'll give you just one example - A certified welder in Alberta repaired a holding strap on a propane tank attached to a large RV. Several months later the strap failed and one of the occupants was killed. My company was called in to conduct a failure analysis of the welded strap by the insurance company. We determined that the welder did not follow the manufacturers recommended welding repair procedure. The manufacturer was absolved of liability, but the welding company was successfully sued for millions. The welding company was bankrupt in less than 6 months. So if you, as a certified welding apprentice take on the repair of this rear differential and if it fails any time in the future - you could be held responsible and liable for tremendous financial penalties. So you think long and hard about what you are willing to risk, by helping your friend before you actually do any welding on a motor vehicle in Alberta.

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    Jon (10-20-2015)

  10. #28
    Frank S's Avatar
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    Nixrox is exactly spot on with everything he said. the single most important thing when contemplating a repair such as this is your liability insurance policy. you have to make sure that there are no exclusions to coverage in this area. and if you do not have a policy or are not covered under a company's policy for a repair such as this call someone like the Axle Doc. and hire them to do the repair.


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    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

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