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Thread: Help me find a modern use for this tool

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by bluegrallis View Post
    I worked as a machinist, tool maker and machine repairman for most of 40 years. The angle of the tool is not important for it's intended use. It is set to a certain height by use of a micrometer or a height gage and used to set a precise angle with a sine bar or sine plate.
    I also worked as a Tool Maker for 35 years before retiring 2 years ago. I used them as bluegrallis did with a height gage to set precise angles on sine plates. By using, for example, a 10" sine plate, you would determine what angle you wanted to accomplish, fine the SINE of that angle, multiply that by 10 for the 10" sine plate (or 5 for a 5" sine bar). This is the height you would set the planer gage to and the let the "boss" of the sine plate/bar on it to achieve the angle. The extra bars are just extensions so you can achieve higher heights and as such, steeper angles.

  2. #12
    mklotz mklotz's Avatar
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    OK, a bit of follow-up.

    As a result of my HSM thread, several fellows measured their planer gauges' angles. They were all different; it seems each manufacturer has his own idea of what it should be. Obviously, this blows my idea that it's a useful feature out of the water. Well, it was a good thought and perhaps my discussion will inspire some toolbuilder out there to make a new and intriguing tool. Perhaps somebody learned a little about measuring angles accurately as well.

    Yes, planer gauges can be used to set sinebars. I've already discussed the error implications of using something other than Jo blocks in my error analysis here...

    Sine bar errors

    Adjustable parallels use the same principle of operation as the planer gauge - adjustable height obtained via in inclined plane and are often used to set sine bars. I used one in measuring the planer angle here...

    Accurate angle measurement

    The planer gauge, being wider than a parallel, is perhaps a bit less prone to tilting but, other than that, works the same as a parallel.

    Some planer gauges are supplied with scriber attachments similar to those for a height gauge so the tool can be used for marking out. If you don't yet have a good height gauge, it's worth making such an attachment.

    And yes, bastard threads are the norm. The rod on my B&S has a thread that doesn't seem to fit anything on my inferial thread gauge. It does thread into the 5 x 0.5 mm hole but I can't believe B&S would use metric. It's 0.18" diameter which is close to a #10 size but 0.5 mm pitch is close to 50 tpi, a long way from the UNF 32, and AFAIK, there is no #10 UNEF specification. The whole affair is maddening.
    ---
    Regards, Marv


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    Marv,

    Just a comment on your description on what a planer is - I've only ever seen planers whose beds move under the gantry to which the cutting tool is mounted. There are a few youtube videos by people who have restored them - fascinating, like a shaper but usually capable of much bigger work. Just goes to show how incomplete my education has been!

    Also, a vote of thanks for all your contributions to our knowledge.

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  6. #14
    mklotz mklotz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Papa Smurf View Post
    Marv,

    Just a comment on your description on what a planer is - I've only ever seen planers whose beds move under the gantry to which the cutting tool is mounted. There are a few youtube videos by people who have restored them - fascinating, like a shaper but usually capable of much bigger work. Just goes to show how incomplete my education has been!

    Also, a vote of thanks for all your contributions to our knowledge.
    Thanks for that. I could swear I've seen photos of one that operated as I described but, as they say, a mind is a terrible thing to lose. Yes, the table, not the gantry, moves. Here's a nice video of one in operation...



    Regardless of what moves and what is stationary, the effect on the workpiece is the same.
    ---
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  8. #15
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    Now that is a Planer! I was wondering if a planer gauge could be used to accurately set Jointer blades with an adapter the width of the blades?
    ‘‘Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest.’’
    Mark Twain

  9. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by PJs View Post
    Now that is a Planer! I was wondering if a planer gauge could be used to accurately set Jointer blades with an adapter the width of the blades?
    Instead I'd use a surface gage & a test indicator.

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  11. #17
    mklotz mklotz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PJs View Post
    Now that is a Planer! I was wondering if a planer gauge could be used to accurately set Jointer blades with an adapter the width of the blades?
    You probably could use it to set jointer blades but I would think building something like this...

    Planer Knife Setting Jig - For Full Size Planers; Pair - Jointer & Planer Accessories - Jointing & Planing

    would work better and provide some fun time in the shop. Two micrometer heads, a couple of magnets and some bits of aluminum and you've got yourself a homemade tool to display in the forum.
    ---
    Regards, Marv


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  13. #18
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    Thanks Dr. Stan and Marv for your input. It occurred to me that if one knew the height from the drum quadrant to the table locked in place and the height the blade needed to be from the drum, a bar (attachment) could be used on a Planer Gauge to the edge of the blade and then leave full room to get your wrench in there.

    I recently acquired a late 60's (Heavy Iron ~250lbs) American WJ-6 Jointer, although it's made in Taiwan it's a beast with a 12A motor. Even though it made a piece of rough 4" walnut, baby but smooth in 3 passes when I picked it up, I know I will need to go through this process during cleanup and dial in. It had been in a horse stall for a couple of years, covered.

    Perhaps I can come up with a novel and proper way to set these blades, Marv. Will definitely post if/when I do. It does seem to me that the setup in your link having only 2 thou accuracy could be improved on and may have some issues with cosine depending on placement on the drum and contact with the head of the micrometer. On a 6" blade its not much especially for wood working but when you take into account multiple blades the finish/flatness could suffer. Of course I'm probably over analyzing this but enjoy the process...besides I still need to find a manual for this thing to know what the blade height is supposed to be.
    ‘‘Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest.’’
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  14. #19
    mklotz mklotz's Avatar
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    Thinking out loud here. Remember, I've never used a jointer (although I understand what the tool does.)

    You don't really need the micrometer heads, just a fine screw and some sort of lock for it. Say X is the desired blade height above table. Make up space/Jo block stack of height X, With stack on flat surface, bridge stack with tool, turn down screw until magnet contacts stack, then lock screw.

    Now loosen blade lock screws, bridge each end of blade with one of these gadgets, let magnets suck blade up to proper height. Tighten blade lock screws and you're done.

    I probably missed one or a few nuances but that should give you the general idea.
    ---
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  15. #20
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    Micrometer heads would be nice; not critical. There are many convenient metric diameter and thread combinations that will impart fine settings. Intuition says magnets are the ticket; if direct contact/ impact is not allowed, especially neodymium. Planer blades likely are 65c Rockwell, assuring chipped cutting edges.
    A possible design.
    Two sections of tubing bored to fit the drum diameter; part way around. Whatever projection intended, set by a wiregauge between drum and brass tipped screw. Then it is moved over the blade bottomed out in it's slot, clamp loosened, blade pulled up by magnet, and re-clamped?
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

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