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  1. #1
    scorch's Avatar
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    High Speed Spindle (Router) Mount for a CNC Mill

    Mount for attaching an auxiliary router motor to a CNC milling machine. Cast from aluminum and finish machined to fit.

    High Speed Spindle (Router) Mount for a CNC Mill-mount_05_installed.jpg

    Here is a picture of the Craftsman router and finished mount before assembly.
    High Speed Spindle (Router) Mount for a CNC Mill-mount_03_finish_w_router.jpg

    Link to Project Page:
    High Speed Spindle (Router) Mount for a CNC Mill | Scorch Works Blog

  2. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to scorch For This Useful Post:

    kbalch (04-15-2015), Paul Jones (04-16-2015)

  3. #2
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    Thanks scorch! I've added your High-Speed Spindle Mount to our Forging and Casting category, as well as to your builder page: scorch's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:


  4. #3
    scorch's Avatar
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    My builder page (scorch's Homemade Tools) is starting to look like a tools for routers page. I am going to have to change it up a little for my next tool.

  5. #4
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    I'm impressed that you even take the time to cast your aluminum before making the part you need. Great job!

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    scorch (04-15-2015)

  7. #5
    scorch's Avatar
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    @DIYer, You have an interesting take on casting the part first. I don't consider it "taking time". I think it might actually save time in the end since there is a lot less machining to do after the part is cast. Making the wood pattern also allows me to work out what the part will look like as I build the wood pattern. When I am making the wood pattern I can just glue on more wood if I want to add a tab or make a feature thicker. If I went straight to making it out of aluminum I wouldn't have that flexibility.

    Not to mention the raw material cost is dramatically lower when I cast the part from scrap aluminum. I use aluminum that would otherwise be discarded so it is essentially free. Of course I do have to pay for the fuel to melt the aluminum.

  8. #6
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    Thanks for posting this! When I saw that router mount casting on your page it inspired me and I immediately bough the Gingery foundry book. I did some alu casting in college and have always wanted to do more. This is definitely on my list of skillz to work on.

    Do you have any pics of your forge and crucibles?

    -Tyler

  9. #7
    scorch's Avatar
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    The Gingery book is good. Another good source of information is Backyardmetalcasting.com
    I use the homemade refractory recipe that is on the Backyard metal casting site. I can't remember why for sure but I think the refractory in the Gingery book needed something I didn't have or didn't want to source.

    I use a steel crucible. It is made from angle iron and bottom plate that I welded together (Using a homemade welder of course.). I also have a smaller on made from welded together sheet (~.1 inches thick).

    My furnace is made from an old popcorn tin. It has pictures of snowmen and holly on it so it is pretty funny to see it in the yard during the summer.

    (To get an idea of scale the furnace cover pictured below is 12 inches in diameter.)

    Picture of the Furnace and Crucible:
    High Speed Spindle (Router) Mount for a CNC Mill-furnace_crucible.jpg

    Picture of the furnace cover (it is cracked but it is reinforced with "rebar")
    High Speed Spindle (Router) Mount for a CNC Mill-furnace_cover.jpg

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to scorch For This Useful Post:

    Paul Jones (04-17-2015)

  11. #8
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    Cool, thanks for taking the time to document and share.
    I will be building my set-up soon.
    -Tyler

  12. #9
    scorch's Avatar
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    I found this picture of the as cast part with the gate and sprue still attached. I though it might be of interest.
    High Speed Spindle (Router) Mount for a CNC Mill-mount_01_as_cast.jpg

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    Paul Jones (04-17-2015)

  14. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by scorch View Post
    @DIYer, You have an interesting take on casting the part first. I don't consider it "taking time". I think it might actually save time in the end since there is a lot less machining to do after the part is cast. Making the wood pattern also allows me to work out what the part will look like as I build the wood pattern. When I am making the wood pattern I can just glue on more wood if I want to add a tab or make a feature thicker. If I went straight to making it out of aluminum I wouldn't have that flexibility.

    Not to mention the raw material cost is dramatically lower when I cast the part from scrap aluminum. I use aluminum that would otherwise be discarded so it is essentially free. Of course I do have to pay for the fuel to melt the aluminum.
    That's a great point of view, scorch, one that never occurred to me. When I said taking time, it was from knowing dangerously little about casting, only enough to know that voids can be a problem, resulting in poor quality and frustration. Looking forward to more of your posts so that I keep on learning from this site.

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