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Thread: Homemade press

  1. #11
    Soikkeli Tuomas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kess View Post
    Hi Tuomas,

    Well done,
    I like your design, sometime I must be decide and make one.
    Thank you very much Kess.
    Last edited by Tuomas; 01-13-2018 at 02:33 AM.

  2. #12
    Soikkeli Tuomas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toolmaker51 View Post
    I appreciate your design as well, so [after our weather!] will produce 2 such frames. For some unknown 'don't know why' I want a screw press too. What I do know, when it comes to straightening parts, screws with sufficient tonnage are the ticket. Quite sure this frame will accept a nut and lead screw from either end.
    Thanks buddy.

    I planned to make wide scissor jack and use it for straightening. I could swap jacks when necessary, that was also one reason why i placed jack down.
    With thinner material i could use power drill for rolling, with thicker material handle.

    I think it would work nicely. Tought.. i don't need to straighten thicker than 6-8mm materials, i thick somewhat 2-3 ton power would be enough.

    Btw. Made first parts to my "No weld quick action hold down clamps". Brake seems to work just like i hoped.

    Homemade press-clamp.jpg

  3. #13
    Soikkeli Tuomas's Avatar
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    Decided to make simple pipe bending attachment first.

    Parts. Video coming little later.
    Seems to work nicely.

    Homemade press-fb_img_1515943060291.jpg
    This is for 12mm pipe. And just a prototype.
    Last edited by Tuomas; 01-15-2018 at 11:59 PM.

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    chy_farm (04-07-2018), Seedtick (01-14-2018)

  5. #14
    Jon
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    If you're ever worried that you'll have to stop building tools after you finish your latest tool build, just look at Tuomas's builds. This is the strategy of a skilled toolbuilder - simply make new tools for the tools you've already built or own. All of these accessories are for just three tools: a drill press, an angle grinder, and a Dremel.


  6. #15
    Soikkeli Tuomas's Avatar
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    Thanks Jon!


    Simple pipe bending attachment.

    Material:
    Surplus steel, nylon replacement heads from the dead blow hammer, bolts.

    Homemade press-new-image.jpg



    It can be used to bend pipes and rods to 12mm diameter. ( grooves on the dies are with 12mm diameter )

    Same idea works with bigger pipes too, radius of the center die needs to be bigger than this one tough.

    Next add is a roller bender.
    Last edited by Tuomas; 01-16-2018 at 02:34 PM.

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  8. #16
    PJs
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    Knocked it Out of the Park, Tuomas! ~PJ

  9. #17
    Soikkeli Tuomas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PJs View Post
    Knocked it Out of the Park, Tuomas! ~PJ
    Thanks buddy. Kind of trying to proof that making a press in this way might be better option for a small workshop user like me. Its easier to get more benefits from it.
    Last edited by Tuomas; 01-17-2018 at 01:33 AM.

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  11. #18
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    "Die" is a correct term; applied on tools that cut or form in conjunction with a punch, called a "die set".
    Sometimes a distinction is made, naming them according to function, especially "forming die". Dies that cut are a bit more common, and "die" is sufficient.
    While a metal brake forms by clamping and bending, a press style exhibits a more distinct entry of a punch into a die.
    Large dies performing a series of operations, are "progressive". Usually fed from long rolls of material, not necessarily just flat stock, according to finished part.
    'Drawing' is a forming operation too, common parts are door knobs, drawer handles, firearm cartridges...The stock can be sheet or thick slugs.
    There are dies doing a set of operations, often hand fed from station to station, of individual pieces. These work in many instances; such as long parts with each end being trimmed in a radius. One I built, made a metal reinforcement for truck mud flaps. Upper edge had long bevels left and right, lower side had two radius's. It also stamped the manufacturer name in the middle. That company didn't have a wide press with sufficient tonnage for a single hit, the build accommodated that. Two hits, cut one bevel and radius left then right, stamping occurred once with the right side.
    The subject of types of dies go far deeper than this!
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

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  13. #19
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    Hi Tuomas,
    Well done, very nice.
    Regards

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  15. #20
    Soikkeli Tuomas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toolmaker51 View Post
    "Die" is a correct term; applied on tools that cut or form in conjunction with a punch, called a "die set".
    Sometimes a distinction is made, naming them according to function, especially "forming die". Dies that cut are a bit more common, and "die" is sufficient.
    While a metal brake forms by clamping and bending, a press style exhibits a more distinct entry of a punch into a die.
    Large dies performing a series of operations, are "progressive". Usually fed from long rolls of material, not necessarily just flat stock, according to finished part.
    'Drawing' is a forming operation too, common parts are door knobs, drawer handles, firearm cartridges...The stock can be sheet or thick slugs.
    There are dies doing a set of operations, often hand fed from station to station, of individual pieces. These work in many instances; such as long parts with each end being trimmed in a radius. One I built, made a metal reinforcement for truck mud flaps. Upper edge had long bevels left and right, lower side had two radius's. It also stamped the manufacturer name in the middle. That company didn't have a wide press with sufficient tonnage for a single hit, the build accommodated that. Two hits, cut one bevel and radius left then right, stamping occurred once with the right side.
    The subject of types of dies go far deeper than this!
    Thank you very much from the info! I'm slowly learning these english terms. There's no good dictionary about industrial terms, so its sometimes little frustrating to explain something what could be sayed with one word. But you just don't know it. ��

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