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  1. #1
    jjr2001's Avatar
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    Making more space in the shop

    I ran out of space in the shop about 10 years ago but I keep adding stuff.
    Had all these paint cans taking up a large part of two shelves in a very deep cabinet.
    It was hard to find the can I needed. So........

    I used up some scrap lumber. Made a piece of 1/2" plywood out several pieces of 1/4" plywood.
    Made up 4 inverted shelf brackets using some scrap 3/4" plywood.
    Threw on a couple coats of paint and walla. Note the shelf is suspended from the bottom of the brackets.
    This allows the shelf to be below the ceiling and still have a lot of useful head space.
    I consider it light duty but it will hold all the paint cans I can put up there.

    Now I can see my paint. Got rid of some scrap wood. Reclaimed some cabinet space.
    Best of all I reclaimed some space that was not being used on the wall.

    Still get one car in the two car garage. Several of my tools and tool boxes are on wheels.
    Just sayin.....

    Oops, now I see some more space below the paint shelf that could be reconfigured.

    Cheers, JR
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Making more space in the shop-img_3607b-copy.jpg   Making more space in the shop-img_3608b-copy.jpg  

  2. The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to jjr2001 For This Useful Post:

    Frank S (02-10-2018), Jon (02-11-2018), LMMasterMariner (02-11-2018), Paul Jones (02-10-2018), PJs (02-12-2018), rossbotics (02-11-2018), Seedtick (02-11-2018), thehomeengineer (02-10-2018), Tuomas (02-12-2018)

  3. #2
    Jon
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    An upside-down shelf is an unusually accurate example of an Egg of Columbus:

    An egg of Columbus or Columbus' egg refers to a brilliant idea or discovery that seems simple or easy after the fact. The expression refers to an apocryphal story in which Christopher Columbus, having been told that discovering the Americas was inevitable and no great accomplishment, challenges his critics to make an egg stand on its tip. After his challengers give up, Columbus does it himself by tapping the egg on the table to flatten its tip.

  4. #3
    jjr2001's Avatar
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    Indeed, Thanks Jon, I think Columbus was one of the few, early, think outside the box guys.


    Cheers, RJ

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    These are really good. I had one 4m long by 300 mm by 19mm Meranti above our full wall length mirror in our main bath room.It was supported by nice looking upside down steel brackets. The better half, last year, said "that's gotta go" "Why?" "it holds too much stuff"-it carried boxes for nebuliser, first aid , insect sprays,spare toilet rolls, household gear, etc etc etc so I ripped it out: after 20 odd years of faithful service and now all that gear clutters my shed space & I have a chip in the long mirror to try to hide.The bathroom does look bigger with it gone but when it is 13 ft by 12 ft does it really need to look roomier? LOL.

    The ones in my shed work well too: i teered them down from a standard door width (820 mm) to (600 mm) or 2 ft to easy to reach 6 inch ones. Now I have a large NZ board to use for some future project:- had to store it on top of an antique extension ladder high above my head.The things we do!

  6. #5
    Soikkeli Tuomas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjr2001 View Post
    I ran out of space in the shop about 10 years ago but I keep adding stuff.
    Had all these paint cans taking up a large part of two shelves in a very deep cabinet.
    It was hard to find the can I needed. So........

    I used up some scrap lumber. Made a piece of 1/2" plywood out several pieces of 1/4" plywood.
    Made up 4 inverted shelf brackets using some scrap 3/4" plywood.
    Threw on a couple coats of paint and walla. Note the shelf is suspended from the bottom of the brackets.
    This allows the shelf to be below the ceiling and still have a lot of useful head space.
    I consider it light duty but it will hold all the paint cans I can put up there.

    Now I can see my paint. Got rid of some scrap wood. Reclaimed some cabinet space.
    Best of all I reclaimed some space that was not being used on the wall.

    Still get one car in the two car garage. Several of my tools and tool boxes are on wheels.
    Just sayin.....

    Oops, now I see some more space below the paint shelf that could be reconfigured.

    Cheers, JR
    Good idea. I could use it too, but im just so short.

    Btw.
    I have used to store spray cans upside down, so the propellant gas doesn't leak out.
    Specially if storing them long times, propellant slowly leaks out from the nozzle. ( not every can, but it happens some times, specially if can is used couple times. )
    But when the can is upside down it doesn't happen, because propellant rises to the bottom area wich is sealed.

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ranald View Post
    These are really good. I had one 4m long by 300 mm by 19mm Meranti above our full wall length mirror in our main bath room.It was supported by nice looking upside down steel brackets. The better half, last year, said "that's gotta go" "Why?" "it holds too much stuff"-it carried boxes for nebuliser, first aid , insect sprays,spare toilet rolls, household gear, etc etc etc so I ripped it out: after 20 odd years of faithful service and now all that gear clutters my shed space & I have a chip in the long mirror to try to hide.The bathroom does look bigger with it gone but when it is 13 ft by 12 ft does it really need to look roomier? LOL.

    The ones in my shed work well too: i teered them down from a standard door width (820 mm) to (600 mm) or 2 ft to easy to reach 6 inch ones. Now I have a large NZ board to use for some future project:- had to store it on top of an antique extension ladder high above my head.The things we do!
    Lost some good storage space there ranald. The way I see it storage space is like tools. Always better to have storage space you don't need than to need storage space you don't have.

    Cheers, JR

  8. #7
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    Tuomas, I have a light weight 4' ladder in the shop that is perfect for reaching all my storage that is just "out of reach".

    Good Idea on storing the spray cans upside down. Paint is thicker than gas so that plugs the valve.

    Cheers, JR

  9. #8
    mklotz mklotz's Avatar
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    Another useful rattle can trick for future readers...

    After use, before storing away, invert can and blast a bit of the gas through the spray button to clear the paint residue. I do this and store the cans right-side-up and haven't had much problem with clogging.
    ---
    Regards, Marv


    Home Shop Freeware
    http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

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  11. #9
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    Cleaning spray can nozzles

    Indeed Marv, great way to keep that nozzle clean for the next use.

    Another method I use frequently is to remove the nozzle from the can and put it in a jar of thinner.
    Let it soak a bit and then use the air hose to clear it. Repeat once and that is it.
    Place it carefully on the can or store them in a container for later use on another can if you happen to get one plugged up.
    More work but better to have nozzles that you don't need than to need a nozzle that you don't have..

    Cheers, JR

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  13. #10
    Jon
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    Can anyone speak to the act of recharging aerosol cans? I know this is at very least a contentious topic. Note the comments in these two builds:

    Homemade Aerosol Can Recharging - HomemadeTools.net
    Homemade Aerosol Can Recharger - HomemadeTools.net

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