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Thread: Making a Really Nice Nut Driver

  1. #1
    rgsparber's Avatar
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    Making a Really Nice Nut Driver

    This article, intended for those new to the metal working hobby, explains how to forge a nut driver. You will need a lathe and a few hand tools plus a heat source.

    If you are interested, please see

    http://rick.sparber.org/FND.pdf


    Your comments are welcome. All of us are smarter than any one of us.

  2. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to rgsparber For This Useful Post:

    kbalch (01-15-2015), mklotz (10-19-2017), olderdan (10-19-2017), Paul Jones (01-28-2018)

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    Content Editor DIYer's Avatar
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    Very nice, Rick! Heating the rod to form the hex is clever. Is heat treatment recommended for longevity purposes?

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    rgsparber's Avatar
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    If I was going to heat treat the tool, I would start with W-1 drill rod. Not sure it is worth the trouble given the expected number of times I will use it and how little torque I need to drive a 2-56 nut. Yet it would be an interesting experiment. Hmmm.

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    Rick,

    Great explanation on the technique and I agree that heat treating is probably not needed for something driving a small 2-56 nut. The 2-56 and M2.5x0.45 size nuts are pretty common on small stationary steam engine models and having a homemade nut driver would be a nice addition.

    Thanks for sharing, Paul

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    olderdan (10-19-2017)

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    Great build Rick, gotta love those DIY tools oh yea....:O)

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    CedarSlayer's Tools
    Nice method Rick, I will have to try it. I have made collets in bronze by carving a hexagonal hole, but your method looks easier.





    I took a long hex tool and ground a high angle edge on it. This was rotated and driven with a mallet into a hole similar to the one you used.

    Bob
    Prove that you are sentient, make a tool!
    http://toolmakingart.com

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    Paul Jones (01-28-2018)

  10. #7
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    Thanks Rick! I've added your Nut Driver to our Metalworking category, as well as to your builder page: Rick Sparber's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:


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    Content Editor DIYer's Avatar
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    Thanks, Rick and Paul, for pointing out that heat treatment, in this case, is not really necessary.

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    Paul Jones (01-28-2018)

  13. #9
    Content Editor Altair's Avatar
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    That's an interesting method. Little machining required.

  14. #10
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    I agree. Softening the metal then driving in an Allen wrench or bolt is clever.

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