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Thread: Mill depth stop improvement

  1. #11

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    Hi Marv.
    My spindle travel is 5" and to set the stop at one inch you have to turn a small
    knob down 4", and that is a very slow process. When your done you turn
    the knob back up to get full travel again. It's not impossible, it's just time consuming.
    A speed nut would have been great.

    Thanks Marv for you help

    Jim D.

  2. #12
    Toolmaker51's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Deprey View Post
    Hi Marv
    Have ever seen a quick stop for a round column mill? I have a Grizzly G1007
    and the depth stop is very inconvenient.
    Thanks
    Jim D.
    Is adjustment regulated by hex nuts appearing below slot and marker on front of spindle housing? Yup, that's pretty stinking inconvenient. A guess tells me conversion/ modification is possible.

    Our substantial round column drill press has a sliding clamp combined with the marker. A small threaded lever secures it to the rod and stops when it bottoms out on housing. Same rod is slotted, if I made one, a brass tipped screw would set on a full length flat.

    You'll see photos and you-tubes here https://www.google.com/search?q=BAIL...nt=firefox-b-1
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

  3. #13

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    Toolmaker51
    Thank you for your response. If you find a solution, please let me know.
    The Grizzly G1007 has a round knurled knob which can be seen on the lower front next to
    the spindle. That knob is attached to a six inch screw which holds the marker.
    If your looking for 1" of travel you have to turn the knob until the market moves
    a full four inches. There's got to be a better way.

    Jim D.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Deprey View Post
    Toolmaker51
    Thank you for your response. If you find a solution, please let me know.
    The Grizzly G1007 has a round knurled knob which can be seen on the lower front next to
    the spindle. That knob is attached to a six inch screw which holds the marker.
    If your looking for 1" of travel you have to turn the knob until the market moves
    a full four inches. There's got to be a better way.

    Jim D.
    What is behind the panel? That will clue us on possible alterations. Seems a speed nut could be in your future.
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

  5. #15

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    Behind the panel is the same screw you see on the outside of drill press or Bridgeport.
    The screw is only held by the casting at the bottom where the knob is located.
    The marker is held in place by a small metal strip on the outside of the panel, other then
    that the screw moves kind of willy nilly in there. The nut is made to fit in that
    grove on the front of the panel and is held in place by that small metal strip. I will remove the panel and post a few photos
    of what it looks like, as soon as I figure out how to post photos.

    Jim D.

  6. #16

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    He is a picture of the G1007 posted by someone else.
    https://www.cnczone.com/forums/verti.../8497-cnc.html

    Hope this helps

    Jim D

  7. #17
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    Like old over the counter indigestion relief ads, "Try It, You'll Like It!" A staple in every household, but that's another story. Just click on the pic.
    Mill depth stop improvement-jpegs.jpg
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

  8. #18

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    Thanks Toolmaker51 I will try that. I have also made a few modifications to this
    mill that have worked very well for me, I'll send you pictures of that also.

    Again, thank you

    Jim D

  9. #19

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    educated nut

    Hi Marv; I would like to point out another design for that I believe also will suit the purpose of that nut.
    It was marketed by Bridgeport , but can be adapted to any mill with a treaded depth stop.
    it used to be called "educated nut", and its very quick to set.. also it won't be hard to made as well.
    regards
    Mariano

    Quote Originally Posted by mklotz View Post
    Like many mill-drills, mine came with a depth stop that consists of a threaded rod (1/2-20) with a longitudinal flat on it. (See first picture below.) The actual "stop" consisted of two nuts; one acted as the stop and the other as a lock nut to hold the stop in place.

    Calling it a poor design would be a compliment. The nuts had too little inertia to spin freely so one had to tediously turn them by hand, then repeat the same operation with the so-called lock nut. Precise adjustment was nearly impossible and the lock nut seldom stayed tight so the setting would drift.

    I solved part of the problem by turning a heavy, elongated brass nut (see second picture) that had enough inertia to spin rapidly up and down the thread if given a healthy twist. Rather than fuss with a lock nut, I threaded the stop for five 8-32 setscrews. Tightening one of these against the flat holds the stop in place with no chance of drift. I used five screws because that makes for a convenient setting interval. (1/5) * (1/20) = 0.01" so each setscrew position represents a ten thousandth inch change in depth relative to its neighbors.

    I only use this stop when I need very fine control over the depth setting. For less demanding work, a clip-on commercial stop of the type shown in the third picture is quicker to use. It consists of a spring-loaded "clothespin" with a split hole threaded to match the depth rod. Repositioning it is done very easily and it doesn't slip but it does lack the fine position control of my design.








  10. #20

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