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  1. #1
    mklotz mklotz's Avatar
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    Modifying small screws

    Here's how I go about modifying the ends of small screws...


    A brass 'collet' is made for each size of screw by tapping a short slug of brass with the required thread and then milling a small flat on the slug. The screw is then threaded through the collet and secured in place with a lock nut. The collet is then inserted into a steel tube and locked in place with a set screw.

    The whole assembly is then stuck in a 5C collet on the lathe and the required work performed. (The picture shows a dog point put onto a 2-56 screw.)

    The brass "collets" are easy to make and, over time, you'll acquire a collection of them to fit the screw sizes you use most frequently. They're a handy use for the uselessly short bits left over from stock rods.
    Last edited by mklotz; 07-05-2017 at 04:40 PM.
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    Regards, Marv


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  2. The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to mklotz For This Useful Post:

    benkeller3 (10-31-2017), jere (09-01-2015), Jon (08-29-2015), kbalch (08-31-2015), Moby Duck (04-05-2018), Paul Jones (09-01-2015), PJs (09-02-2015), rlm98253 (11-02-2017), User Name (02-20-2016)

  3. #2
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    Thanks mklotz! I've added your Screw Modification Tool to our Lathe Accessories category, as well as to your builder page: mklotz's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:


  4. #3
    Content Editor DIYer's Avatar
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    Another great idea, thanks.

  5. #4
    jere's Avatar
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    very interesting, I have seen automotive engine head studs that require the dog point but what are you using such a small one for?

  6. #5
    mklotz mklotz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jere View Post
    very interesting, I have seen automotive engine head studs that require the dog point but what are you using such a small one for?
    In this particular case it was for a working model of a WWII deck gun...

    Model Deck Gun


    Last edited by mklotz; 07-11-2017 at 08:41 AM.
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    C-Bag (09-07-2015), Christophe Mineau (09-02-2015), jere (09-01-2015), kbalch (09-01-2015), oldcaptainrusty (11-01-2017), olderdan (11-03-2017), Paul Jones (09-01-2015), PJs (09-02-2015)

  8. #6
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    What a fantastic piece! Absolutely awe-inspiring model making.

    Ken

  9. #7
    jere's Avatar
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    Ken said it better than I could! the "working " part really caught my attention too!

  10. #8
    mklotz mklotz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jere View Post
    Ken said it better than I could! the "working " part really caught my attention too!
    Yes, the handwheels train and elevate the barrel, and the recoil absorber mechanisms all work as in the real thing. The barrel is made from a turned down .22 rifle barrel so it's fully rifled. The quick-lock, quarter-turn breech block is operated via the handle. The only thing that's unrealistic is the blocky structure on the breech block which contains the trigger mechanism and the firing lanyard.

    It can fire .22LR. However, we have five grandchildren so the firing pin is removable and hides in the dummy shell you can see in some of the pictures. [Real ammo is kept in a gun safe.]

    Here are a couple more pictures...






    Last edited by mklotz; 07-11-2017 at 08:39 AM.
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  12. #9
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    What an incredible piece of work.

    Which specific model of deck gun was the inspiration? What scale did you use?

    Ken

  13. #10
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    Wow, your precise workmanship on this model is fantastic and having a working model takes it to yet another level. I found on your website the section for "Information Nuggets" very interesting. Looking forward to seeing more of your custom tools (and your model examples).

    Paul

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