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Thread: My homebuilt tools

  1. #1

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    Beri's Tools

    Lightbulb My homebuilt tools

    Quote Originally Posted by kbalch View Post
    Hi Beri,
    If you've built any interesting tools, yourself, we'd love to see them!
    Regards,
    Ken
    Hi everyone,

    as per request here are a few of my homebuilts :

    (Mostly) wooden bandsaw, as per woodgears.ca plans

    My homebuilt tools-beri-1.jpg

    rear view

    My homebuilt tools-beri-2.jpg

    Wooden woodturning lathe (mostly as per Shopnotes plans, but driven with a drill press)

    My homebuilt tools-lathe_1-b.jpg

    A simple disc sander (180mm)

    My homebuilt tools-beri_sander_1-b.jpg

    A tablesaw-router table combo

    My homebuilt tools-tablesaw011.jpg

    My homebuilt tools-tablesaw003.jpg

    My homebuilt tools-tablesaw002.jpg

    An electric pottery wheel (for my girl)

    My homebuilt tools-img_5001.jpg

    My homebuilt tools-img_5003.jpg

    And of course, many minor mods on handtools.. like everyone does

    Next project : powered metal hacksaw (but at the moment not enough free time... in a month or 2 maybe)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails My homebuilt tools-img_5010.jpg  

  2. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Beri For This Useful Post:

    ghostcat (10-12-2012), Jon (09-20-2012), kbalch (09-20-2012)

  3. #2
    Jon
    Jon is online now Jon has agreed the Seller's Terms of Service
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    Thanks Beri! These tools have been added to the following categories: Sanding and Grinding, Woodworking, Table Saws, and Bandsaws. We've also setup your homemade tools page here: Beri's homemade tools. Your receipts:



  4. #3

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    very interested in getting more information about what you used for the pottery wheel. Did you have a plan from somewhere or your own ?
    thanks in advance...

    your projects look very professional

    zipp

  5. #4

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    Beri's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by zippidee View Post
    very interested in getting more information about what you used for the pottery wheel. Did you have a plan from somewhere or your own ?
    thanks in advance...

    your projects look very professional

    zipp
    Hello zipp,

    the pottery wheel is a very simple one. It uses a old washing machine motor and pulley. Those motors have 2 speeds, 315 rpm and 2800 rpm. Only the slow winding is used, and you want your wheel spinning at around 60-70 rpm. For making more delicate object like tall slender vases, you will want a wheel with adjustable speed, 3 - 120 rpm for example. But for a beginner, the simple on off type is enough. I have attached a picture, under the motor is an additional fan, because the motor at 315 rpm does not have enough cooling to run for more than 5 mins (good enough for the washing machine, but not for the pottery wheel )
    Make sure the switch is waterproof, and no water can get on the electrical parts...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails My homebuilt tools-kolo2.jpg  

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    Thumbs up thanks for the info..

    Quote Originally Posted by Beri View Post
    Hello zipp,

    the pottery wheel is a very simple one. It uses a old washing machine motor and pulley. Those motors have 2 speeds, 315 rpm and 2800 rpm. Only the slow winding is used, and you want your wheel spinning at around 60-70 rpm. For making more delicate object like tall slender vases, you will want a wheel with adjustable speed, 3 - 120 rpm for example. But for a beginner, the simple on off type is enough. I have attached a picture, under the motor is an additional fan, because the motor at 315 rpm does not have enough cooling to run for more than 5 mins (good enough for the washing machine, but not for the pottery wheel )
    Make sure the switch is waterproof, and no water can get on the electrical parts...
    ---
    is the platter part wood or plastic ?
    what about the shroud for the platter ... looks like it might be a plastic basin or such ?
    ... wow... did not realize you needed that much speed range for this... if you have a set of those stepped pulleys (like on a drill press) would that give sufficient range ? and how much torque is actually needed for the turning ?

    (next thing to consider.... a kiln)

    thanks

    zipp
    http://www.homemadetools.net/forum/i...ons/icon14.png

  7. #6

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    Beri's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by zippidee View Post
    ---
    is the platter part wood or plastic ?
    The platter (blue) is metal, I found it dumped behind a shop, it was a sort of turntable display...
    I put 2 pins in it, and a plywood disc on top, that is where you actually work. When you make a few pieces in a row, you remove the plywood disc with your work to dry up before removing it for drying and kiln.

    what about the shroud for the platter ... looks like it might be a plastic basin or such ?
    Yes, just a plain plastic basin, with a collar in the middle (for the shaft) and a drain, which is plugged while you work and you can release the sludge for cleaning

    ... wow... did not realize you needed that much speed range for this... if you have a set of those stepped pulleys (like on a drill press) would that give sufficient range ? and how much torque is actually needed for the turning ?
    I don't think stepped pulleys would work, you need throttle control.. start slow and speed up. Now imagine yourself with muddy hands changing the belt from pulley to pulley
    For the initial centering of the clay, the torque is not insignificant. Later on, when forming the piece, it is rather small. To give you an idea, my motor is 90W @ 315 rpm reduced to 70 rpm and it is more than enough.
    The speed regulator is more of a convenience than actual need. If you use a DC motor its easy to add. I have seen pottery wheels driven with cordless drills, when the battery dies and is too expensive to replace. Add a DC source ( PC power supply for example, or lead acid battery charger) and there you go. Reducer, speed regulation, even torque limit, is built in already
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails My homebuilt tools-basin.jpg  

  8. #7

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    Beri's Tools
    and yes... if all fails....
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails My homebuilt tools-potter.jpg  

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    Jon (10-08-2012)

  10. #8
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    Wow, that's something I've never seen - and I so rarely get to say that!! :-)

    Very resourceful!

    Ken


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