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Thread: Nail box with hidden compartment

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    Carpenter & blacksmith Philip Davies's Avatar
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    Nail box with hidden compartment

    Nail box with hidden compartment-7f9a42de-c3e1-46fa-a5f8-6235c8fc037d.jpg
    Tomorrow I am going out shopfitting for the first time in four years! I was wondering whether the organisation I work for, as a volunteer, would need me again. Usually, I take the attitude that I do not want to take money from tradesmenís pockets, but in this case we are constrained to make use of recycled materials and time is short. But I am glad to have a further opportunity to be of service.
    So I have dusted off my nail box, which dates from the 80s. I made use of a piece of furniture that had had regular saw cuts inside the cabinet, to form the partitions. But the handle is an off cut of maple. I wanted a nice, comfortable handle, so I thought I may as well make a compartment for the nail sets.Nail box with hidden compartment-02d8fa86-ad29-46c9-bc9e-73b8f1db45cb.jpg
    (The table also dates from the 80s)

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    Knowing Mr. Davies is a UK resident, I had to google 'shopfitting' for a description of what it entails.
    Here, it sounds akin to 'millwright' that work getting businesses operational; often move or build, install, level machine tools, office equipment and the like. I'm surprised an organization can assemble volunteers for that work. Use of recycled materials then aligns it somewhat with our "Habitat for Humanity'.
    Either way, I'm impressed. It sounds rewarding and beneficial. I imagine working with other trades-people this way is spirited, not different than how we interact at HMT.net
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

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    Carpenter & blacksmith Philip Davies's Avatar
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    Just to clarify, Toolmaker, a shopfitter is a high-class carpenter and joiner (well, I cannot really claim to be high-class) and fits out shop premises, so that they are presentable. At present, it is first fix carpentry, stud wall construction and I am using a load of wood abandoned by previous occupants. Now that I am a pensioner, I can afford to help a local charity with their relocated furniture store. A millwright over here is someone who builds a watermill or a windmill, although it has also come to mean an engineer who sets up, and maintains, the power source in a factory. Going to look up HMT now!

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    edit of
    Quote Originally Posted by Philip Davies View Post
    Just to clarify, Toolmaker, a shopfitter is a high-class carpenter and joiner (well, I cannot really claim to be high-class) and fits out shop premises, so that they are presentable...
    A millwright over here is someone who builds a watermill or a windmill, although it has also come to mean an engineer who sets up, and maintains, the power source in a factory. Going to look up HMT now!
    Millwrights here do a impressive amount of promotional material, bonding themselves together and insuring presence is recognized by the public.
    I am fascinated how certain, identical terms indicate different but related forms of work. Likely, the connection roughly parallels how jobs themselves evolve over time.
    As a group deserving all the compliments and pride chosen to bestow one another, practitioners of arts critical to society.
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Philip Davies View Post
    Just to clarify, Toolmaker, a shopfitter is a high-class carpenter and joiner (well, I cannot really claim to be high-class) and fits out shop premises, so that they are presentable. At present, it is first fix carpentry, stud wall construction and I am using a load of wood abandoned by previous occupants. Now that I am a pensioner, I can afford to help a local charity with their relocated furniture store. A millwright over here is someone who builds a watermill or a windmill, although it has also come to mean an engineer who sets up, and maintains, the power source in a factory. Going to look up HMT now!
    Philip, I worked for a Wood Flooring company, which was Licensed to "create" (or work in creating . . .) Commercial Buildings. The technical skills catagory was called "Floor Mechanic" !!!

    My job was "Specialty Wood Works" anything the Floor Mechanic would get Slowed Down on. DoorWays, working around Pillars & Posts, free forming wood ("CTF" Cut To Fit) flooring in & around Masonry or Stone Work AND Floor Repair in existing Homes or Offices.

    My "secret" compartment was actually a Second Level for my toolbox, Hand Made of a special Oak Plywood, similar to "Baltic Birch Plywood" Extra Veneers compared to AC plywood. BOTH my regular tool box & the extra one had their bottoms covered in scrap carpeting, Glued on so there was Zero Scratching when I set my tool boxes down.

    Retired now, but I still have one of the most unique tool carrier systems on the West Coast!

    philip, from the Great Pacific NorthWET.
    Last edited by philipUsesWood&Brass; 07-05-2018 at 03:27 AM.

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    Toolmaker
    Here's a good description from WIKI. The big problem of translation between English dialects is indeed the multiple definitions! Think shop as in 'shoppe' or store for N Americans. The Brits, et al, Aussies and KIWIs 'Go down the shops', means to go to the store(s). Their 'store' is a place like a warehouse to, wait for it, 'store' goods...
    And next time you visit a British (or formerly) country, don't call your 'bum bag' a 'fanny pack'!! 'ave a laugh with this link Australian slang dictionary
    Cheers, mate..
    Jim
    30 yr expat in AUS

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    Thanks Philip Davies! We've added your Nail Box to our Storage and Organization category,
    as well as to your builder page: Philip Davies's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:




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    Carpenter & blacksmith Philip Davies's Avatar
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    Good point, Jim. When I was an English teacher, I set my “fifth years”/“year 11” class a project on American English and cultural differences. (These pupils/kids/students/learners/clients/customers were aged 15 or 16). My source material was two episodes of The Simpsons!
    I also used magazine articles. But it would not have been so easy to study different Australian idioms, and of course, the influence of American values is far greater.

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    mklotz mklotz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beserkleyboy View Post
    Toolmaker
    Here's a good description from WIKI. The big problem of translation between English dialects is indeed the multiple definitions! Think shop as in 'shoppe' or store for N Americans. The Brits, et al, Aussies and KIWIs 'Go down the shops', means to go to the store(s). Their 'store' is a place like a warehouse to, wait for it, 'store' goods...
    And next time you visit a British (or formerly) country, don't call your 'bum bag' a 'fanny pack'!! 'ave a laugh with this link Australian slang dictionary
    Cheers, mate..
    Jim
    30 yr expat in AUS
    And when you come to the States, don't ask around for a place to get fags. Whole different meaning here!

    Yes, two three nations separated by a common language.
    ---
    Regards, Marv


    Home Shop Freeware
    http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

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    Ha Ha! Fags and fannies can get you in all kinds of strife! I remember a PBS series in about 1985. a dozen or so episodes of the origins and development of English throughout the world. Had to learn a whole new language when I moved to AUS in '87....and now my watered down California accent (of the day) sounds Irish to the Irish, cause of the pronounced 'Rs', and Americans and my sister think I speak with that 'funny' Australian accent. My sister was in stiches when she came to visit in 2014, could barely understand the locals... go figure. Cheers mate and congrats on the new award, well done!

    Jim in South Coast NSW,
    30 yr expat in AUS


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