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Thread: Needle Valve Sight Gravity Drip Feed Oiler - What tubing have you used?

  1. #11

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    Drip Oiler

    Quote Originally Posted by Chipmaker View Post
    Yes your idea will work but only up to a point that when you want to part off you will find the drip feed oiler does not deliver enough coolant and that you have to fill it to frequently to be practical. Bite the bullet now and get yourself a small coolant pump with tank, they are reasonable price. The alternative is to use a loaded coolant brush from a coolant can BUT this is not a good solution as the parting process needs two hands.
    I agree wholeheartedly with Chipmaker. The nice brass and glass drip oilers look impressive to look at but they are not very functional. I've seen a number of drip oilers from a 1 qt. oil can with a hole punched in it suspended over the work piece to some precision micro pumps.

    However for most home machinists, an inexpensive coolant pump will provide much more satisfaction, over time, than a drip oiler. Of course you will have to come up with a coolant recovery mechanism to recycle the coolant but that is a minor issue.

    More to the point is that you will have a better choice of coolants that you can more readily change to suit the work which will result in a better surface finish. There are many different water soluble coolants for ferrous and non-ferrous stock that can keep the cost in check.
    A fog or a flood of coolant removes more heat from the working edge of the cutter than does a drip. Size your coolant delivery orifice to the needs of the work.

    Freeing up both hands to control the work is priceless.

    A better surface finish at the machining phase saves hours of polishing later.
    Good luck.

  2. #12

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    OIL DRIPPER CHEAP

    Quote Originally Posted by Metalmuncher View Post
    Hi folks. I didn't find much mention of an answer in a search, so here is my current question:

    I have one of these brass and glass Needle Valve Sight Gravity Drip Feed Oilers, which has a 1/8" MPT at the delivery end. Rather than experiment and re-invent the wheel, I am wondering if any of you have used these for dripping cutting oil on a lathe, mill, saw, etc. and can tell me what size, what material, and how small a diameter tubing one can use on these and still get a decent drip feed. I want to rig it up with a magnetic base mount (I have a couple extras not in use) so I can stick it on my lathe or mill, and use it to drip cutting oil on the cutter as it is working. I think a small diameter tube, something I can bend, position, and re-bend without kinking or breaking would be ideal. Would one of the "Cardan Joint" bendable tubes (looks like little plastic bowls stacked against each other) like they use on pump cutting oil systems work for a drip feed?

    I've also got some 1/4" PEX tube, but its rather stiff. I think small copper refrigeration tubing would bend OK at first, but eventually work harden and get brittle. That's why I thought getting a Cardan Joint tube, with the small nozzle on it, would make things simple for adjustment. I just don't know if they are too small to gravity drip cutting oil.

    Any suggestions are appreciated.
    WHAT I USE IS: WHEN I GO TO HOSPITAL & THEY DO AN IV I ASK FOR IT WHEN THEY TAKE IT OUT.
    MOST TIMES THE VALVES & OTHER PARTS OF IT ARE THERE.
    I'M CHEAP, JUST FILL BAG WITH LUBE & HANG.

  3. #13

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    mrehmus2's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by Nightshift View Post
    Metalmuncher, those needle valve sight glass gravity drip oilers work great on old machines to keep bronze bushings properly oiled. You are gonna use pretty lightweight oil which will gravity flow down a very small tube.
    I did that on my old 14 inch Rockford lathe. Found the bearings heated up a bit after a long run. Switched to 50 weight Mobil 1 synthetic and the bearings never ran warm after that. Did the same thing on my Bridgeport spindle bearings with 30 weight Mobil 1. Since these are total loss oiling systems, the detergents in the oil do not cause problems.

  4. #14
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    Nightshift's Tools
    Metalmuncher, here's what I use when I need a cutting oil flow on either the mill or a lathe. This unit has magnets on the back of the control box so it will stick anywhere. I usually just leave it stuck on the side of this tool chest which sits between my 10EE and the mill. There are 2 nozzle ends on long hoses which also have big magnets that will stick close to the cutter. It uses low air pressure and small ball valves to provide a controllable positive flow where needed. You just keep the reservoir on top filled with cutting oil. I don't use it often as it makes a mess, especially if doing a long job. Bill
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Needle Valve Sight Gravity Drip Feed Oiler - What tubing have you used?-acculube-portable.jpg  

  5. #15

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    Thanks for all the interesting suggestions!

    What I am aiming for here is a lazy way to replace the coolant application on my mill and lathe that has served me will since the turn of this century.........dripping it on with a small nozzle bottle, a little at a time, repeatedly, as needed. That way I don't have a pool to deal with, no need for compressed air or a pump, and no need for any kind of coolant recovery system. Most of the coolant/cutting oil ends up on the chips, which, once I am sure they are cool, get vacuumed away with my shop vac.

    What this device I assembled does for me is allow me to have the drops of oil I would be stopping and applying manually to be automatically applied, at any rate I choose. This sight drip oiler has a wide range of adjustment, from very slow (several seconds per drop) through nearly a steady stream, and is very consistant at any setting, even after it loads the tube I am using with oil. However, that tube is not very position-able, as it was designed for an oil can. I've learned the type of jointed tube I mentioned initially (and visible in Nightshift's posted photo above) is sold under the product name Loc-Line, and Amazon carries it in several ways. I have ordered a "kit" of it with fittings, as well as a pliers tool for assembling/disassembling the custom lengths desired, and intend to use that instead of the current oil can tube I have in place.

    In reply to the mention of parting off, applying drops of coolant to the groove the tool cuts is how I've always done that. I have no problem parting non-ferrous materials (my mainstay here). The only issues I have with parting come when I try to do some kind of steel, which becomes an issue of things moving that should not move, allowing the cutter to hog in. But brass and aluminum part beautifully for me. I have a saw, so when I work with ferrous stuff I saw it to oversize length and then face the ends to the desired length on the lathe or mill.

    Thanks!

  6. #16

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    I have not used this for this purpose. There's reasons these are used to supply lube to ways & spindles, AND that misters are used to supply cutting fluids to cutting tools. Either way you have to get the fluid in sufficient quantity to where the tool meets the workpiece. It takes very little fluid in just the right place to do the job. Flooding is OK IF you have a way to control/collect the excess. Misters cool the work far better and consume far less fluid in a very diluted form (typically in water).

    Still, I suppose the drip method could/should work IF you can get fluid to the cutting edge.

  7. #17

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    I've used plastic tubing from when it became available (yes I am very old) I also use plastic tubing on my vacum chucks.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by jimirwin View Post
    It takes very little fluid in just the right place to do the job.
    I agree wholeheartedly!

    The Re-Li-On fluid I use is fairly thin in consistency, but it adheres well to either a flat surface, hole being drilled or tapped, or a spinning piece on the lathe. As my current method has always been to put the fluid in place, then do the cutting, the cutter enters the middle of the adhering fluid to make the cut. So it seems prudent for me to have the drips laying down just ahead of the cutter as it advances.

    Flooding/recovery and misting seem a great idea for high-speed production runs, where the overall cost of using those systems is billed to a customer. For one-off hobby jobs like I do, a bottle of cutting oil lasts me a very long time. And many operations don't require cutting oil at all.

  9. #19
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    Thanks Nightshift! We've added your Bandsaw Oiler to our Miscellaneous category,
    as well as to your builder page: Nightshift's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:





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