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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Perth Western Australia
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    Hi Marv

    While I like your line of thinking, I think you have taken a little bit of "poetic license" with the larger vee of the involute shape. What you really gain with this shape is a "lower" or shallower vee block (which of course may be an advantage). Given a true vee block with the same width vee as the top of the involute vee, the tangent of the true vee block would provide a more secure holding position and power than the involute vee. The curved sides of the involute vee will not be a true tangent as in the true vee block. Effectively you have two "circles" pressing against each other.

    If you were to reduce the involute vee to the same width as the smaller vee shown in your images, I think the holding power of the involute vee would be of concern. In any given vee width, most nominal diameters would sit much deeper (more secure) in a true vee block than an involute vee.

    Kind regards

    Peter

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Feb 2017
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    Once you have an involute cutter the V block making gets easier although a corner rounding end mill will work and produce very acceptable fixtures. About how to find a cheap cutter? Take a look at eBay. Lots of prices run under $20, often a lot under for oddball pitches and cutters that were beyond practical resharpening for a professional shop and are now remnants of a box of shop scrap in the hands of a dealer in used tools. You may still need to make an arbor to hold the cutter in your spindle but fiddly accuracy or perfect key slots are not needed for this application as long as you take your cuts with a slow feed to accommodate the teeth on the high side of the cutter that are doing the work.


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