Free 173 Best Homemade Tools eBook:  
Remove advertisements
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20

Thread: Railroad track anvil

  1. #1
    sossol's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Lafayette, Indiana
    Posts
    92
    Thanks
    136
    Thanked 154 Times in 61 Posts

    sossol's Tools

    Railroad track anvil

    I got a small, butchered piece of rail track some years ago in a lot of tools that I bought. I wanted to, but never did anything with it until I saw the excellent one that Tuomas Soikkeli posted here recently. That inspired me to action. The 155lb Trenton anvil inspire the design. I didn't need it, and may never use it, but that's never stopped me before.

    This is before:
    Railroad track anvil-before-img_6756.jpg Railroad track anvil-before-img_6758.jpg Railroad track anvil-before-img_6757.jpg Railroad track anvil-before-img_6759.jpg Railroad track anvil-before-img_6760.jpg

    This is after:
    Railroad track anvil-after-img_6855.jpg Railroad track anvil-after-img_6846.jpg Railroad track anvil-after-img_6860.jpg Railroad track anvil-after-img_6858.jpg Railroad track anvil-after-img_6865.jpg

    The horn is modeled after the one on my Trenton anvil. There wasn't enough material to copy the heel, and the whole top is offset, so I worked that into the shape. I don't know what kind of rail this is or how old it is, but the curved side and top looked worn in, rather than ground. The side with the sharp corner had a bit of a lip or burr. I took a 1/16th off the "sharp" side with a 7" grinder to level the top.
    I used a bandsaw to rough in the shape, and used a Diamond X grinding wheel to level the surfaces, a diamond cutting wheel to slice the base to make the "feet", a 4 1/2" Pferd Polifan wheel to make the inside radii, then some flapdisks to smooth it all out, and a wire wheel to de-rust the rest.

    When I got it done, I had to set up this photo.
    Railroad track anvil-biglittleimg_6867.jpg

    If I decide to finish polish and/or mount it to a scaled stump, I'll add some more photos.
    Last edited by sossol; 06-12-2017 at 09:00 PM.

  2. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to sossol For This Useful Post:

    billster (03-17-2018), blkadder (06-18-2017), Paul Jones (06-14-2017), rlm98253 (03-17-2018), Ron 2 (06-15-2017), Seedtick (06-13-2017), Toolmaker51 (06-15-2017), Tuomas (06-20-2017)

  3. #2
    Content Editor DIYer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    3,087
    Thanks
    338
    Thanked 659 Times in 598 Posts


    Thanks sossol! We've added your Anvil to our Anvils category,
    as well as to your builder page: sossol's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:

    tags: anvil



  4. #3
    Saxon Violence's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    11
    Thanks
    45
    Thanked 8 Times in 3 Posts

    Cool

    Friends,

    Where is a good hassle-free source of RR Rail Segments?

    A walk along a RR Track used to be sufficient in days gone by, but modern welded rail doesn't create as many stubs AND Many Railroads have become wet and soggy, remarkably saline and damned hard to get along with—Pressing criminal charges over 10-20 Pounds of scrap Iron someone inherited…

    Saxon Violence

  5. #4
    Carlos B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    94
    Thanks
    75
    Thanked 108 Times in 35 Posts

    Carlos B's Tools
    RR anvils seem to be popular now a days, I just completed mine today. I found a badly rusted 71/2' section on my property, covered in vegetation, when I was filling in the old homestead basement dug out. That might be your best bet if you know someone with a piece they are willing to give up. The anvil I just completed is 11/2' long, I would give you a similar piece if you were close by but 45 lbs. is too hefty to ship from Canada.

    Railroad track anvil-3-rail-section.jpg
    From a popular rap: "If time is money then I need a loan."
    Carlos B, http://www.hobbyworkshopprojects.com/

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Carlos B For This Useful Post:

    blkadder (06-18-2017)

  7. #5
    Saxon Violence's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    11
    Thanks
    45
    Thanked 8 Times in 3 Posts
    Yeah,

    When I worked for the L&N Railroad (35 years ago) I found that rail is identified by how much a yard of it weighs. All else being equal, heavier rail gives a steadier platform and allows faster trains—plus it lasts longer.

    Almost all the new rail that we installed was 139-pound rail. So far as I know that was the heaviest size rail in common use at the time. 139-pound is the only exact number that I can recall, but I think that we installed some reconditioned 110 or 115-pound rail in Virginia due to a lack of 139-pound. Some of the old little used sidings had very old 80 or 90-pound rail.

    There was some silly commercial extant back then that showed a cowboy hatted track worker carrying a whole section of rail on one shoulder—but someone pointed out, this would have been far less improbable in the old west days when they used 80-pound rail—still, that would be a mighty heavy load.

    Anyway, I ramble.

    Saxon Violence

  8. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Saxon Violence For This Useful Post:

    Beserkleyboy (07-12-2018), blkadder (06-18-2017), C-Bag (06-15-2017), Paul Jones (06-15-2017), Toolmaker51 (06-15-2017)

  9. #6

    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    2
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    I have wondered that same question for a long time. I don't know if there is a ready source for track pieces. You might try ebay and local craigslist. The likelihood is low. You can sometimes find real anvils for $3.00 per pound or less. I wouldn't pay more, though I've seen listings for lots more. Emerson makes a great anvil out of cast 4140 steel, and you can get them for about $700 including shipping, as long as the anvil weighs 150 pounds or less. Not everyone knows that UPS will ship any package that weighs 150 lbs or less. My recommendation is to save your money and buy a real anvil, not cast iron, not an anvil-shaped object, and nothing from hobbofrate. They have some good stuff, but not anvils. I have also read that you can buy a smaller anvil and tightly couple it to a heavy base to increase the apparent mass. It's not as good as a 200 or 300 lb anvil, but it will serve you well until you can buy a good heavy one.

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to juniorsamples For This Useful Post:

    Toolmaker51 (06-15-2017)

  11. #7
    nonhog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    house
    Posts
    11
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 5 Times in 4 Posts

    nonhog's Tools
    Depends on where you live. I know a place in Puyallup Wa.(next door to Tacoma) that sells it. A&K Railroad Materials, Inc. | Railroad Track Building Materials
    It has been a few years since I stopped there.

  12. #8
    C-Bag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    California, central coast
    Posts
    720
    Thanks
    689
    Thanked 829 Times in 466 Posts

    C-Bag's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by Saxon Violence View Post
    Yeah,

    When I worked for the L&N Railroad (35 years ago) I found that rail is identified by how much a yard of it weighs. All else being equal, heavier rail gives a steadier platform and allows faster trains—plus it lasts longer.

    Almost all the new rail that we installed was 139-pound rail. So far as I know that was the heaviest size rail in common use at the time. 139-pound is the only exact number that I can recall, but I think that we installed some reconditioned 110 or 115-pound rail in Virginia due to a lack of 139-pound. Some of the old little used sidings had very old 80 or 90-pound rail.

    There was some silly commercial extant back then that showed a cowboy hatted track worker carrying a whole section of rail on one shoulder—but someone pointed out, this would have been far less improbable in the old west days when they used 80-pound rail—still, that would be a mighty heavy load.

    Anyway, I ramble.

    Saxon Violence
    Great info. Should have known that a rail wasn't just a rail. There has been a number of people trying to sell rail pieces on the local CL. I thought they wanted too much. Today I checked back and there is a semi done one for $25, that I could handle. I was also shocked to find out you could get in trouble for having some rail as the last shop I worked at was next to tracks and was littered with swapped out rails. Some had been there for who knows how long. Another example of learning some cool stuff after the original post.

  13. #9

    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Sandy, OR
    Posts
    40
    Thanks
    30
    Thanked 7 Times in 4 Posts
    I know I'll be sorry I asked this...but what do you guys use anvils for?

  14. #10
    hemmjo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    75
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 52 Times in 24 Posts

    hemmjo's Tools
    Whenever I see a pesky chipmunk in the flower bed, I hang the anvil from a rope over his hole. Then when he comes out, he trips over a tiny thread that I stretch across the hole, that knocks the stick out that it holding the anvil up and drops it on his head.

    When I am not killing chipmunks with it, I use it to flatten or straighten steel plate or rod. Or to bend steel plate or rod. Or to shape heated metal using hammers. Or to set rivets. SO MANY uses for anvils, even if you don't have chipmunks.

    Lots of videos online.

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to hemmjo For This Useful Post:

    Mark Fogleman (06-22-2017)

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •