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Thread: Repairing Nicked Extension Cords

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    rgsparber's Avatar
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    Repairing Nicked Extension Cords

    Do you wrap electrical tape around extension cords that have had their sheath nicked? Are you happy with the result after some time has passed? Me neither.

    Here is how I now do the repair.

    https://rick.sparber.org/ExtensionCordRepair.pdf

    Your comments are welcome. All of us are smarter than any one of us.


    Thanks,

    Rick
    Rick

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    Soikkeli Tuomas's Avatar
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    That's a good solution. I wonder could " inner tire repairing glue " work too. We don't have that brand on the stores.
    Its locktite tough, so i think it sold under different name here.

    I have tried something similar with extra fast super glue, that makes repaired section unflexible.

    Nice info. Thank you!

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    rgsparber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tuomas View Post
    That's a good solution. I wonder could " inner tire repairing glue " work too. We don't have that brand on the stores.
    Its locktite tough, so i think it sold under different name here.

    I have tried something similar with extra fast super glue, that makes repaired section unflexible.

    Nice info. Thank you!
    Give the tire repair glue a try and let us know how it works.

    Superglue is brittle so I'm not surprised it didn't work. This Go2 Glue remains flexible and holds tight. Nice product except for its relatively brief shelf life. I suggest people buy it at a big box store which has decent stock turnover.

    Rick
    Rick

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    Tonyg's Avatar
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    I use Liquid Tape Electrical. It is a rubber coating for use as electrical tape and insulation. This flexible coating exhibits excellent protection from acid, alkaline, and abrasion, as wells as sealing out moisture and salt permanently. It comes in a container with a built in brush in the lid. I believe it also comes in an aerosol, but I have not tried that.
    It is very flexible and bonds really well, feels like rubber to the touch.

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    Frank S's Avatar
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    I've tried various things hate using vinyl electrical tape for these for the same reasons Rick stated. I've never had much success with the liquid tape for some reason. but the tool handle dip rubber coating seams to work. My cords usually don't just get nicked though so I wind up either having to make a full splice repair or if the break is near the end I wind up cutting it and end up with a shorter cord with a replaceable end once that is done if there are any new nicks I like to remove the end and use heat shrink tubing.
    3M also makes a heat shrink tape that you can simply wrap around then heat it to allow it to vulcanize itself.
    If you can't find the go2 glue you might try shoe goo That TV advertised flex glue may work with the sheathing like Rick has done. One nice thing about his repair is it is not very noticeable unlike most other repairs.
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

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    I haven't seen that product here. I always cut off the damaged shortest bit & often wondered about heat shrink, since its intro here, but haven't damaged one for a while. Some how I'd be reluctant to repair as i have seen a 15 amp one that moisture had gotton into the protective sheath. The result was scarey: two of the wires became really corroded at the plug which was metres from the electrical taped sheath damage.

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    That is a definitely a concern ranald, that wire corrosion creeping further and further along the conductors.
    Especially here in rainy wet Oregon.
    I really like using heat shrink tubing, but find the adhesive lined tubing cures too inflexible for this particular use.
    That's great to hear about the tape though. I've never seen or heard of the 3M shrink tape, but have often wished it had been invented.
    I'll have to look into that!

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    Tonyg's Avatar
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    Hi Frank,
    The 3M tape is very good, I often use it on underground cables at the splice kits to stop epoxy egress while it cures and moisture ingress once it is buried.

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    [email protected] tonyfoale's Avatar
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    I use "flexible" heat shrink tube. A week or so back I nicked a cable down to the bare wire, it was in the centre of the cable. I cut through and made staggered joins in the two lines (a no earth tool) with the heat shrink on each, then a second layer over the area where the outer sheath was missing and then a final covering extending 12mm or so over the outer sheath. I have several such repairs and never had a problem.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tonyg View Post
    I use Liquid Tape Electrical. It is a rubber coating for use as electrical tape and insulation. This flexible coating exhibits excellent protection from acid, alkaline, and abrasion, as wells as sealing out moisture and salt permanently. It comes in a container with a built in brush in the lid. I believe it also comes in an aerosol, but I have not tried that.
    It is very flexible and bonds really well, feels like rubber to the touch.
    Tonyg,

    Article has now been updated to include your suggestion.

    Thanks,

    Rick
    Rick

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