Free 50 Best Homemade Tools eBook:  
Remove advertisements
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1
    Paul Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Yorba Linda, California
    Posts
    1,121
    Thanks
    4,596
    Thanked 1,167 Times in 581 Posts

    Thread Identifier Caddy

    Years ago I bought a pair of Imperial and metric thread identifiers for small nuts and screws (for example see https://www.amazon.com/Innovative-Co...thread+checker ). The set of thread identifiers are very handy. The checkers are strung on steel cables and this keeps the sets organized but the cable makes it difficult to check threaded parts that can’t be removed. After seeing Marv’s Thread Checking board (see Thread checking ), I wanted to organize my sets the same way. The caddies are made from ¾” red oak. I applied several coats of clear polyurethane from a spray can to seal the wood and protect it from oil. Below are photos of the Imperial thread version.

    Thread Identifier Caddy-purchased-thread-checker-homemade-caddy.jpg

    Thread Identifier Caddy-thread-checkers-stored-caddy-plus-missing-6-40-8-36-checkers.jpg

    I also added a pair of missing UNF 6-40 and 8-36 thread checkers machined from 12L14 steel to complete the Imperial set for the typical UNC and UNF threads from #6 to ½”. I have the taps for these sizes but had to resort to single point chasing the external threads and verifying dimensions using the three wire method. The sets are not too expensive and I recommend buying rather than making unless you really want to improve your external threading technique and three wire measurement skills. I used a conventional single thread chasing technique to make these small thread parts.

    Thread Identifier Caddy-single-point-chasing-8-36-thread-checker.jpg

    However, I have started using the upside down threading tool in the QCTP and lathe in reverse threading technique demonstrated by Joe Pieczynski on his You Tube channel (Published on Jun 9, 2016) and highly recommend this technique.

    Thank you for looking,

    Paul
    Last edited by Paul Jones; 01-01-2017 at 06:05 PM.

  2. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Paul Jones For This Useful Post:

    bobs409 (01-04-2017), C-Bag (01-01-2017), mklotz (01-01-2017), PJs (01-02-2017), Seedtick (01-04-2017)

  3. #2
    mklotz mklotz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    LA, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,315
    Thanks
    84
    Thanked 2,362 Times in 845 Posts
    I bought the set of metric thread checkers, mainly because my collection of metric screws, taps and dies is not very complete and making a thread checker board like the one I showed would have required buying a bunch of stuff for which I would have only limited use.

    Like Paul, I soon realized that the cable was great for keeping them organized but really got in the way when you have to use the thread checker on a nut/bolt secured to a structure. The individual checkers should be sold in a case of some sort that keeps them together and organized but still removable for individual use. However, it's easy to sever the cable with a cutoff disk and mount them on a board as Paul and I have done.

    Screw checker plates, e.g.,

    https://www.amazon.com/SAE-Inch-Scre...ead+identifier

    have their place (indeed, I have several) but are impossible when dealing with a stud attached to a structure. That's where these thread checkers, either the commercial model or self-assembled like mine, justify their cost.
    ---
    Regards, Marv


    Home Shop Freeware
    http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

  4. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to mklotz For This Useful Post:

    Moby Duck (03-23-2018), Paul Jones (01-01-2017), PJs (01-02-2017)

  5. #3
    C-Bag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    California, central coast
    Posts
    720
    Thanks
    689
    Thanked 827 Times in 465 Posts
    At first I only saved specialized fasteners and brackets off of units I'd replaced to do a repair in the shop. Then I just started keeping all fasteners. One whole drawer of an old 3 drawer tool box I inherited has that 40yrs of accumulation loosely divided into metric bolts, standard bolts, mixed nuts, mixed washers. There is everything in there, somewhere

    Over the last couple of big yard sales I've been concentrating on storage cabs so now I think I'm prepared to start sorting through that drawer. There is also the crazy jumble of stuff that is the 2 tray units I bought years ago from Mac to go on the bottom drawer of my main toolbox. That is my shiny objects repository from like scrapped carburetors, and other cool units. Those trays have saved my butt and co workers more times than I can count! But how to organize it so I can find it again....that is the big question.

    These checkers are a great first step. My concern is one of the dings on the checkers is they don't have permanent marks on them as to size. Is this just one reviewers gripe and they fixed it, or does your caddy help keep the size in order and you don't need to worry about it?

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to C-Bag For This Useful Post:

    PJs (01-02-2017)

  7. #4
    Paul Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Yorba Linda, California
    Posts
    1,121
    Thanks
    4,596
    Thanked 1,167 Times in 581 Posts
    Thanks Marv and C-Bag,

    I have the same concern about loosing track of the thread sizes even though the caddy has exact holes that only fit a particular thread diameter (and the pitch could be cross checked with a thread gage). Currently the thread checkers I bought have an adhesive label that may eventual loosen and be lost. I am considering using a fine point permanent maker (e.g., those from Micron, Staedtler, or Sakura Microperm - all available at Michaels) and labeling each hole like Marv did on his thread checker board. We could also use an engraver to mark the shanks of the thread checkers.

    By the way if you restore Starrett tools, you will find that many of the Starrett products have their own unique screw thread pitch and diameter combinations that are either in the unusual special thread series or unique to Starrett (see Brass Clamping Screw for Starrett V-Blocks ).

    Paul

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to Paul Jones For This Useful Post:

    PJs (01-02-2017)

  9. #5
    mklotz mklotz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    LA, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,315
    Thanks
    84
    Thanked 2,362 Times in 845 Posts
    The metric one I bought...

    https://www.amazon.com/Nut-Bolt-Thre...read+detective

    has the size permanently engraved into each piece as can be seen by mousing over the last product photo on that page.

    Given the fact that the piece is held in the fingers and rotated in use, almost any write-on label is likely to wear. Sharpie now sells oil-based paint markers in medium point...

    https://www.amazon.com/Sharpie-Oil-B...+markers&psc=1

    and extra-fine point...

    https://www.amazon.com/Sharpie-Oil-B...arpie+metallic

    Once dry they might resist wear a bit better.

    I haven't tried them yet but intend to order some of both on my next Amazon order. I love their metallic color (gold, silver, bronze) markers for marking dark-colored or black objects. The markings really stand out.

    I have to agree on Starrett's pernicious use of proprietary threads. I ran into that while restoring the fine adjustment screw on a height gage I inherited. Strange practice considering that the bulk of their customers probably have access to a screw-cutting lathe and know how to use it.
    ---
    Regards, Marv


    Home Shop Freeware
    http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to mklotz For This Useful Post:

    PJs (01-02-2017)

  11. #6
    PJs
    PJs is offline
    PJs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Northern CA
    Posts
    808
    Thanks
    4,194
    Thanked 680 Times in 428 Posts
    Nice tip Paul about the inverted threading tool! Thanks!

    I used to use Paint marking pens that are much more permanent than sharpies and not too costly. They also come in bright colors. They take a while to dry properly but once they are they last for years even with grease/oil and solvents. Don't fall for the acrylic ones as the prep is a pita but the enamel ones will go on even a slightly dirty surface.

    I had a yellow bottle dispenser unit with a roller ball in my tool box for many years (10-15) which finally dried out a couple of years ago now.

    Paint Pens and Markers - Buy Dykem, Markal, Sharpie Paint Pens Online

    I also agree about the odd ball fastener pitches and sizes. It seems strange that someone would invent a unique thread for anything other than to have it a proprietary build. Creating the tooling for it has to be costly let a lone supply chain. Browning's 1911 is another good example hairy odd balls. The grip screw bushings are .2360-60 UNS-2A THD and the actual grip screws are .1500-50 UNS-2A/B THD. I guess if you bust a grip and lose a screw you are SOL without a "Browning Store" in your local war zone. Maybe it was the wild west back then and still forming standards...who's nose?
    ‘‘Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest.’’
    Mark Twain

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to PJs For This Useful Post:

    Paul Jones (01-02-2017)

  13. #7
    mklotz mklotz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    LA, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,315
    Thanks
    84
    Thanked 2,362 Times in 845 Posts
    Standards in the USA? You've got to be kidding. Usonians seem to think that any form of standardization, no matter how reasonable, is an attack on their freedom. Hence their irrational resistance to the metric system.

    And even when they do agree to some standardization they botch it up. Drill progressions that have unequal increments (number and letter), backwards non-informative labeling (drills, sheet/wire gages), antiquated units based on animals (horsepower, acres), etc..
    ---
    Regards, Marv


    Home Shop Freeware
    http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

  14. #8
    Paul Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Yorba Linda, California
    Posts
    1,121
    Thanks
    4,596
    Thanked 1,167 Times in 581 Posts
    PJs,

    Thank you for the tip on where to see a broad selection of paint pens that are grease and oil proof.

    Paul

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to Paul Jones For This Useful Post:

    PJs (01-04-2017)

  16. #9
    Content Editor DIYer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    3,072
    Thanks
    306
    Thanked 603 Times in 545 Posts


    Thanks Paul Jones! We've added your Thread Checker Caddy to our Storage and Organization category,
    as well as to your builder page: Paul Jones's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:




  17. #10
    Content Editor DIYer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    3,072
    Thanks
    306
    Thanked 603 Times in 545 Posts


    Thanks Paul Jones! We've added your Thread Checkers to our Measuring and Marking category,
    as well as to your builder page: Paul Jones's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:




Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •