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    Paul Jones's Avatar
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    Using gage pins to measure clock escapement regulator lever adjustments

    I have a carriage clock with a tourbillon mechanism for the clocks escapement design. However, the design of the clock's regulator lever makes very easy to overshoot or undershoot the time adjustment because moving the lever only a few thousandths of an inch can amount to several minute per week time differences. I discovered I could measure the adjustment to one thousand of an inch per adjustment by inserting a gage pin in between the regulator lever and lever cage. I include a couple of pictures to show how this works.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Using gage pins to measure clock escapement regulator lever adjustments-access-tourbillon-carriage-clock-escapement-regulator-lever.jpg   Using gage pins to measure clock escapement regulator lever adjustments-using-gage-pin-measure-regulator-lever-position.jpg  

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    Jon (01-10-2016), kbalch (01-11-2016)

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    Hey Paul,

    Great solution; elegantly simple, as the best ones are.

    Thanks, also, for making me aware of ProClocks and, incidentally, the largest tourbillon movement I've ever seen. Very cool, indeed!

    Ken

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to kbalch For This Useful Post:

    Paul Jones (01-11-2016)

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    Paul Jones's Avatar
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    Thanks Ken. The carriage clock case is approximately 5.5" x 3.5" 3.5" and the tourbillon cage mechanism is approximately 1" in diameter. The clock has glass on all four sides and the tourbillon movement can be seen from the front and side views. The clock keeps very accurate time once set correctly. Proclocks have some very interesting clocks such as their skeleton clocks and Harrison Grasshopper clocks. However, I am very interested in the skeleton clock being constructed at the ClickSpring YouTube website. That would be a fun project. Paul


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