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Thread: 1/2" taper rebar drift punch

  1. #11

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    I'm not sure i would agree that the post needs to be pulled, but it does bear careful thought. that's a 1" piece of rebar firing .22LR: a small diameter low pressure cartridge if there ever was one. You certainly wouldn't want to do that with higher pressure cartridges. The minimum yield strength of rebar in the US is 60,000 PSI, and the fact that the chamber portion is encircled with the high grade steel of that Yost action is even more of a safety factor.

    Let's not get carried away with concern, eh?

    Bob

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by rebuilder1954 View Post
    I'm not sure i would agree that the post needs to be pulled, but it does bear careful thought. that's a 1" piece of rebar firing .22LR: a small diameter low pressure cartridge if there ever was one. You certainly wouldn't want to do that with higher pressure cartridges. The minimum yield strength of rebar in the US is 60,000 PSI, and the fact that the chamber portion is encircled with the high grade steel of that Yost action is even more of a safety factor.

    Let's not get carried away with concern, eh?

    Bob
    The problem is there is always someone who ignores the issue of ignition pressure and builds something for a bigger bore. Then, because many folks don't take responsibility for their foolishness, lawsuits happen. It is best to be safe in this regard.

  3. #13

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    <chuckle>

    if we are worried about lawsuits, Jon had better yank all those posts about novel wood splitters

  4. #14

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    The Last of the Mountain Men Sylvan Hart (clever name, eh?) who resided in Hell's Canyon on the Snake at least into the 1970s demonstrated the manufacture of black powder rifles using jackhammer steel. He claimed to have rifled them with a hand tool.

  5. #15
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    Beware rebar!!! as tool steel!

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank S View Post
    Found another short piece of rebar today this time a 1/2" and 14" long figured it would go well with the previous one which is 3/8" and 9 inches long
    This one I managed to turn the taper on the lathe then heat to cherry and quench it became hard enough to resist a file so I heated to light straw and air cooled it is pretty tough but not brittle Should complement my collection of punches.
    I also have some 3/4" rebar and a piece of 1 1/2" rebar but think I might make other plans of them.
    Attachment 30761
    I used to work in a mini mill and when we rolled rebar, the specs were very forgiving, as a result it was rolled from billets of various grades that did not meet their respective grade for whatever reason. As a result, there was some fine steel going in to the rebar, however some of it was so hard it would actually shatter on the concrete floor when dropped. Bottom line; it could be almost anything depending on where it came from.
    All said, this is a very cool application, and there have been a multitude of rebar projects from all over!
    Last edited by Howder1951; 08-22-2019 at 10:49 AM.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Howder1951 View Post
    I used to work in a mini mill and when we rolled rebar, the specs were very forgiving, as a result it was rolled from billets of various grades that did not meet their respective grade for whatever reason. As a result, there was some fine steel going in to the rebar, however some of it was so hard it would actually shatter on the concrete floor when dropped. Bottom line; it could be almost anything depending on where it came from.
    All said, this is a very cool application, and there have been a multitude of rebar projects from all over!
    Rebar and oilfield sucker rod are 2 of my go to items for making things
    While in Kuwait I had my own QA&QC department with testing facilities in the factory that I had built to my specs by our own staff. the Head office was forever getting requests by our much larger competitors to do 3rd party testing since we had a letter of approval as a testing lab from the ministry of building and construction.
    All too frequently my engineers would have to tell those companies engineers that whole batches of sequential lot numbers of materials would have to be rejected. or used only in specific non structurally demanding areas.
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
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  7. #17
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    There has been many uses of odd materials and like Frank it is a go to metal and bed frames. Something we are overlooking is the man that did the rifle barrel is in Sweden. There metal might be of better quality than ours. And if he is a gunsmith, he might have done a good heat treat that could have brought the stress factors up. I do not think it would be my choice but interesting the same.

  8. #18
    Frank S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ncollar View Post
    There has been many uses of odd materials and like Frank it is a go to metal and bed frames. Something we are overlooking is the man that did the rifle barrel is in Sweden. There metal might be of better quality than ours. And if he is a gunsmith, he might have done a good heat treat that could have brought the stress factors up. I do not think it would be my choice but interesting the same.
    bed frames, bed frames , bed frames to use or not to use when to drill and when to give up and use a torch.
    Most newer fed frames are made from hot rolled sheets then sheared and formed
    Pretty easy to spot the ones that may have ball bearings in the steel because at the break in the metal you will spot tiny little stress cracks once in a while.
    It is the older mill formed frames that look like actual angle iron that are the real mystery metals. you might start to drill a hole and not even a cobalt bit can penetrate all the way through but move as little as half an inch and a bargain counter bit that will bend before breaking will drill through like drilling a hole in a tin can.
    Have a band-saw that you don't like the blade that is in it toss an old bed frame in it then try and make the cut all the way through while still having enough teeth on the blade to recognize.
    I've even seen them glaze over a disk in a chop saw.
    As far as the rifle barrel goes due to it being a full bull barrel bored for .22 ammo I wouldn't worry much about that.
    Yes there are folks trying to build a gun or rifle barrel who have no business doing so. Anyone who does not understand the effects of combustion pressures of a given caliber has absolutely no business attempting to manufacture a fire arm.
    We had a young man on HMT.Net a few years back who was wanting to build a M6 Scout. a very simple little survival weapon that anyone with "MEDIUM" gunsmithing skills should be able to make, as long as they also possess some knowledge in the many different types of metals there are out there GALVANIZED water pipe is NOT one of the accepted mediums to make a .410 shotgun barrel out of.
    Fortunately he posted some pictures of some pipe fittings he had tried to weld together and without shaming him too badly the members of theses forums managed to empress upon him that he needed to acquire some better skills before even considering such a build. Sadly though he left before we were able to help him much more than that.
    I'm not a gunsmith don't claim to be and have never played one on TV but I have bought dozens of non operational guns over the years and repair them to safely fire their intended ammunition and yes I often have to make my own parts sometimes by having a blank piece of stock or a freshly machined part clamped in a vice and file away with jewelers files with a loop over my eyes to get the part just right. I've never had a repair to go bad but I don't use mystery metals in making those parts either, I don't take chances when it comes to working on fire arms.
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
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  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ncollar View Post
    SNIP/Something we are overlooking is the man that did the rifle barrel is in Sweden. /SNIP
    -Umm, a small correction - Ron Smith isn't Swedish, he's a Canadian, based in Alberta.
    Quality (or lack thereof) of rebar here is about the same as everywhere else.
    Cheers


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