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Thread: 1" conduit connectors

  1. #1
    Frank S's Avatar
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    1" conduit connectors

    What do you do when it is Saturday afternoon the local hardware store closed at noon and you are right in the middle of wanting to run some 1" emt conduit when you run out of box connectors?
    Well you can drop everything and drive 75 miles 1 way to the next open store then by the time you get back you are either out of time or out of the mood plus you spent $20.00 on diesel just for half a dozen connectors.
    Or you do like I did you go to your pile of usable stock and someday materials dig out several cut off pieces of 1" pipe that already had threads on one end cut off what you need and bore them half way through to make your own box to EMT connectors
    1" pipe is the same thing as what is called 1" ridged conduit. the threads are the same as well. you just need to bore it out large enough for the EMT to slip in this works for 1/2, 3/4, 1 1/4" 1 1/2" 2" and so on Only when getting above 1 1/2" the shell thickness may be thinner. I haven't ever had the occasion to try anything larger than 2"
    1" conduit connectors-20190824_155838w.jpg

    1" conduit connectors-20190824_155857w.jpg
    My fit was almost a tap in fit and the conduit is going between 2 boxes so I really didn't need the locking screw but put in in anyway by making a weld glob then drilling and taping to 10-24
    1" conduit connectors-20190824_183746w.jpg
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
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    Supporting Member Toolmaker51's Avatar
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    Herein marks only time Frank S will refer to his welding a 'glob', it being intentional. His projects often include welding; I'd have no apprehension standing under same, compared to the 'popcorn' variety common on youtube.
    Sincerely,
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    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

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    Frank S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toolmaker51 View Post
    Herein marks only time Frank S will refer to his welding a 'glob', it being intentional. His projects often include welding; I'd have no apprehension standing under same, compared to the 'popcorn' variety common on youtube.
    Yeah well it is a glop but probably with 70,000 PSi tensile LOL It is at least strong enough to hold the screw
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
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    Thanks Frank S! We've added your Conduit Connectors to our Miscellaneous category,
    as well as to your builder page: Frank S's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:




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    Supporting Member Radioman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank S View Post
    Yeah well it is a glop but probably with 70,000 PSi tensile LOL It is at least strong enough to hold the screw
    Thats only if its a 7018 or some other 70** series glob.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Radioman View Post
    Thats only if its a 7018 or some other 70** series glob.
    Pretty much have that department covered I think

    DUAL SHIELD II 71 ULTRA - Fact Sheet (en)
    Typical Tensile Properties
    Condition As Welded
    Elongation 77 %
    Reduction in Area 28 %
    Tensile Strength 79 ksi
    Yield Strength 71 ksi






    Typical Charpy V-Notch Properties
    100% C02
    Impact Value 72 ft-lb
    Testing Temperature -40 F
    Condition As Welded

    Stress Relieved 62 ft-lb @ -40 F / Stress Relieved Testing Temp 1150 F Stress Relieved Testing Time1 hr
    100% CO2 Condition Impact Value As Welded 114 ft-lb @0 F/As Welded 98 ft-lb @-20 F

    Typical Weld Metal Analysis %
    P 0.012 %/ Mn 1.40 %/ S0.010 %/ C 0.03 % /Si 0.40 %


    Approvals:
    ABS; CWB; CSA W48 E491T-12J-H8; DNV-GL; LR; QPL-24403/1; MIL-71T-1C; QPL-24403/1; MIL-71T-1-HYC
    Classifications:
    ASME SFA 5.36; ASME SFA 5.20; AWS A5.36; E71T1-C1P4-CS2-H8; AWS A5.36; E71T1-C1A4-CS2-H8; AWS A5.20; E71T-1CJ-H8/T-9CJ-H8/12CJ-H8
    Approvals are based on factory location. Please contact ESAB for more information.
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

  9. #7
    Supporting Member Radioman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank S View Post
    Pretty much have that department covered I think

    DUAL SHIELD II 71 ULTRA - Fact Sheet (en)
    Typical Tensile Properties
    Condition As Welded
    Elongation 77 %
    Reduction in Area 28 %
    Tensile Strength 79 ksi
    Yield Strength 71 ksi
    Typical Charpy V-Notch Properties
    100% C02
    Impact Value 72 ft-lb
    Testing Temperature -40 F
    Condition As Welded
    Stress Relieved 62 ft-lb @ -40 F / Stress Relieved Testing Temp 1150 F Stress Relieved Testing Time1 hr
    100% CO2 Condition Impact Value As Welded 114 ft-lb @0 F/As Welded 98 ft-lb @-20 F
    Typical Weld Metal Analysis %
    P 0.012 %/ Mn 1.40 %/ S0.010 %/ C 0.03 % /Si 0.40 %
    Approvals:
    ABS; CWB; CSA W48 E491T-12J-H8; DNV-GL; LR; QPL-24403/1; MIL-71T-1C; QPL-24403/1; MIL-71T-1-HYC
    Classifications:
    ASME SFA 5.36; ASME SFA 5.20; AWS A5.36; E71T1-C1P4-CS2-H8; AWS A5.36; E71T1-C1A4-CS2-H8; AWS A5.20; E71T-1CJ-H8/T-9CJ-H8/12CJ-H8
    Approvals are based on factory location. Please contact ESAB for more information.
    I’m having trouble with ksi? Is that 1000’s per square inch or kg per square inch. Or something totally different?

    I just looked up your wire. Your using a wire feeder! I’m an old fashioned stick man myself. My dad was born in 28 and was a welder for 70yrs. He loved to torch weld. Even in a world of easier options he loved the feel of that torch in his hand. His welds would look like tig. He was a master at his trade. He taught me to stick weld first and the others came later. I always came back to the sticks. I loved what you could accomplish with them. You don’t have to worry about the air around you moving. Your base metal can be a little bit rusty or greasy. Not to mention super portable. No torch to over heat. I think it’s a lot easier to weld heavy trailer hitches and the like with stick. A mig machine big enough to weld 1in plate is not cheap. A used 300amp Lincoln Tombstone can be had for 200 bucks these days.
    Last edited by Radioman; 08-27-2019 at 12:33 AM.

  10. #8
    Frank S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Radioman View Post
    I’m having trouble with ksi? Is that 1000’s per square inch or kg per square inch. Or something totally different?
    KSI is commonly known as 1000s per square inch IE 79,000 pounds per square inch
    But ill regardless a tiny glob will never be anything more than a simple built up area to thicken for use as a means to hold enough threads to hold a screw LOL
    In welding terms there are processes called short arc globular transfer Spray arc etc.
    Most wire feed welders are used in the globular transfer mode. Short arc is usually only when welding real thin material at very low amperage with very small wire like .023" Spray arc is really hot and used only with certain shielding gasses such as trymix or 98% AR & 2% ox. this is done normally on tubing where the parent metal is thick enough to transfer the heat away from the weld area while the wire is almost being vaporized while being applied. the sound of the welding process will be a whistling sound.
    globular transfer will if done correctly sound like the steady sizzle of frying bacon
    Last edited by Frank S; 08-27-2019 at 12:48 AM.
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

  11. #9
    Supporting Member Radioman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank S View Post
    KSI is commonly known as 1000s per square inch IE 79,000 pounds per square inch
    You replied faster than I could edit my post.
    I added a paragraph to the above post.

    Thank for the clarification on ksi.

  12. #10
    Frank S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Radioman View Post
    You replied faster than I could edit my post.
    I added a paragraph to the above post.

    Thank for the clarification on ksi.
    Have to agree with you there on the stick weld I keep several grades and diameters in a rod keeper myself. trying to change out a spool of wire just to make a 2 minute weld on stainless or do a small amount of hard surfacing and don't even think about buying wire for welding up a small crack in cast iron.
    I like the .045"duel shield flux core wire as my go to filler material for many reasons 1 I can adjust down to make welds on thin materials that would be difficult to do even with the McKay 1/16" rods or spin the setting up to lay down more filler than can be done with a 3/16"
    I own several machines such as a 400 amp gasoline drive Miller 2 Miller 250 amp gas drives a Hobart 450 amp mig welder Miller 210 Amp mig 300 Amp Airco DC power supply a Lincoln 250 AC stick welder a 130 amp Hobart mig another little 130 amp mig that I can't even pronounce the name of and my latest addition is a 500 amp National AC/DC tig machine that I can't use yet because I haven't had 3 ph installed and to try and run it on a rotary phase converter would send the electric meter into orbit.I'me sure it would make my electric bill jump a 100 bucks every time I turned it on I think I may have at least 5 more welding machines that I have forgotten their names and sizes.
    Like having 5 lathes 7 band saws 3 mills and 4 drill presses how many machines can 1 old man use at the same time is the question my wife always asks me.
    I tell her it is not a matter of how many I use it is how well diversified and how wide of range of machines I have at my beckoned call. if I decide I have the need
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
    When I have to paint I use http://kbs.justoldtrucks.com/

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