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Thread: The Best Homemade Rocket Stove

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    Supporting Member PowerMk's Avatar
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    PowerMk's Tools

    The Best Homemade Rocket Stove

    Hello guys . Hello guys yesterday I finished my new Rocket Stove. I had a simple rocket stove but I wanted something bigger and better so I decided to make a new one.I worked hard because I really need it . I m often going for camping , fishing and this stove is useful for me especially for fishing!!!
    In the feature I will make some accessories so give me your ideas.

    Enjoy it!!


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    DIYer (12-17-2019), greyhoundollie (12-18-2019), Jon (12-19-2019), Rangi (12-17-2019), verticalmurph (12-19-2019)

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    Thanks PowerMk! We've added your Rocket Stove to our Heating and Cooling category,
    as well as to your builder page: PowerMk's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:



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    PowerMK
    I always wondered; what good is a rocket stove? You can't really use them for heating a dwelling or a tent because they burn fuel to rapidly. They do give out a lot of heat, but very quickly. A guy would be up all night feeding the darn thing just to stay warm. I do like your design because it's for cooking. I would think it would get the job done quickly and would not take to long to cool down. I also like the rectangular cooking surface. Buy the way sir, what time is dinner?

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    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by PowerMk View Post
    Hello guys . Hello guys yesterday I finished my new Rocket Stove. I had a simple rocket stove but I wanted something bigger and better so I decided to make a new one.I worked hard because I really need it . I m often going for camping , fishing and this stove is useful for me especially for fishing!!!
    In the feature I will make some accessories so give me your ideas.

    Enjoy it!!


    I think I would have made the bars for the grill flush with the top so it would be easier to use a pan or pot that is bigger than the rim of your grill.
    Great job. You have some good ideas.

    Paul

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    Quote Originally Posted by owen moore View Post
    PowerMK
    I always wondered; what good is a rocket stove? You can't really use them for heating a dwelling or a tent because they burn fuel to rapidly.
    This statement is false. Have a look on google for "cockle rocket stove" and you will find examples of rocket stoves that have been built for home heating. Not only that - there is even one guy who has measured and quantified the heat output of his rocket stove, coming to the conclusion that it is the most efficient way to extract heat out of fuel to heat a home! I have even seen a Youtube video (from a Russian) who heated his tent (pitched in 10 or 20cm of snow, somewhere in the Urals) with a variant of a rocket stove!
    Quote Originally Posted by owen moore View Post
    PowerMK
    They do give out a lot of heat, but very quickly.
    This statement leads to the core of your error, not because it is false, but because you omit from your thinking a key component of any heating system: temperature conversion from the high temperature inside the fire place (1000oC) to the much lower temperature desired inside the home(20-25oC).

    For PowerMK, efficient conversion of fuel heat from high to low temperature is not much of a concern, portability of his stove, and thus light weight, is. Thus his design is in steel. For house heating, portability is unimportant, but efficient conversion is, as long as a uniform temperature output - not a uniform heat output- is obtained. Thus, the design of a rocket stove for house heating will be very different from the one presented here by PowerMK.
    The first design target for domestic (urban) heating is low environmental emissions. This can be realized if the fire burns at around 1000oC, as near this temperature carbon burns to CO2, not the toxic CO. Particulates (Smoke!) are only produced if the temperature is much lower, and Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) will be produced only if temperatures are much higher.
    The second design target is heat output. If the furnace temperature inside has to be 1000oC for environmental reasons, and the furnace outside no more than, say, 50oC, for safety reasons, then the size of the furnace chamber is determined, for a given heat output, by the surface area of the furnace and the thermal conductivity of the furnace walls, and the total conversion efficiency by the ratio of (heat in the flue gas) divided by (heat emitted through furnace surfaces).
    The third design target is heat transfer rate, i.e. the change in outer furnace surface temperature over time. As this is controlled commonly by building thick furnace walls, alternative names for cockle furnace are masonry furnace, Kachelofen, Finnish or Russian Stove.
    The fourth design target is air flow inside the furnace, and here the Rocket Stove principle shines, because it produces a highly turbulent gas flow, moving fresh oxygen more quickly to the fuel than do other designs, heating the inside very quickly. But because it takes a long time (up to 24 hours, on some designs) for the heat to move through the thick walls and heat the house, it does not matter how long the fire lasts. It only matters how much fuel was burned, and how much heat this fuel transferred to the furnace walls, as it is the heat stored in the furnace walls that heats the house.
    Heat content for fuels is:
    Wood: 4-4.5 kWh/kg
    Coal: 7.8-9.8 kWh/kg
    Fuel oil: 12 kWh/kg

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    Well excuse the hell out of me! Next time I need heating advice, I will contact you.

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    Supporting Member PowerMk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by owen moore View Post
    PowerMK
    I always wondered; what good is a rocket stove? You can't really use them for heating a dwelling or a tent because they burn fuel to rapidly. They do give out a lot of heat, but very quickly. A guy would be up all night feeding the darn thing just to stay warm. I do like your design because it's for cooking. I would think it would get the job done quickly and would not take to long to cool down. I also like the rectangular cooking surface. Buy the way sir, what time is dinner?
    Yes its need feeding to keep the fire but if you try different type of wood you can improve the duration I use oak,yew and olive . This stove its useful to cook something fast. Thank you very much. Everytime is for dinner so tell me your favorite food...

    Quote Originally Posted by Moose57 View Post
    I think I would have made the bars for the grill flush with the top so it would be easier to use a pan or pot that is bigger than the rim of your grill.
    Great job. You have some good ideas.

    Paul
    Thank you very much Paul. I have interesting projects for the feature...


    Quote Originally Posted by CanBeDone View Post
    This statement is false. Have a look on google for "cockle rocket stove" and you will find examples of rocket stoves that have been built for home heating. Not only that - there is even one guy who has measured and quantified the heat output of his rocket stove, coming to the conclusion that it is the most efficient way to extract heat out of fuel to heat a home! I have even seen a Youtube video (from a Russian) who heated his tent (pitched in 10 or 20cm of snow, somewhere in the Urals) with a variant of a rocket stove!

    This statement leads to the core of your error, not because it is false, but because you omit from your thinking a key component of any heating system: temperature conversion from the high temperature inside the fire place (1000oC) to the much lower temperature desired inside the home(20-25oC).

    For PowerMK, efficient conversion of fuel heat from high to low temperature is not much of a concern, portability of his stove, and thus light weight, is. Thus his design is in steel. For house heating, portability is unimportant, but efficient conversion is, as long as a uniform temperature output - not a uniform heat output- is obtained. Thus, the design of a rocket stove for house heating will be very different from the one presented here by PowerMK.
    The first design target for domestic (urban) heating is low environmental emissions. This can be realized if the fire burns at around 1000oC, as near this temperature carbon burns to CO2, not the toxic CO. Particulates (Smoke!) are only produced if the temperature is much lower, and Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) will be produced only if temperatures are much higher.
    The second design target is heat output. If the furnace temperature inside has to be 1000oC for environmental reasons, and the furnace outside no more than, say, 50oC, for safety reasons, then the size of the furnace chamber is determined, for a given heat output, by the surface area of the furnace and the thermal conductivity of the furnace walls, and the total conversion efficiency by the ratio of (heat in the flue gas) divided by (heat emitted through furnace surfaces).
    The third design target is heat transfer rate, i.e. the change in outer furnace surface temperature over time. As this is controlled commonly by building thick furnace walls, alternative names for cockle furnace are masonry furnace, Kachelofen, Finnish or Russian Stove.
    The fourth design target is air flow inside the furnace, and here the Rocket Stove principle shines, because it produces a highly turbulent gas flow, moving fresh oxygen more quickly to the fuel than do other designs, heating the inside very quickly. But because it takes a long time (up to 24 hours, on some designs) for the heat to move through the thick walls and heat the house, it does not matter how long the fire lasts. It only matters how much fuel was burned, and how much heat this fuel transferred to the furnace walls, as it is the heat stored in the furnace walls that heats the house.
    Heat content for fuels is:
    Wood: 4-4.5 kWh/kg
    Coal: 7.8-9.8 kWh/kg
    Fuel oil: 12 kWh/kg
    I have read some books and information for this stove but I have to say your information its so useful. Really thank you CanBeDown!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by PowerMk View Post
    ... and the total conversion efficiency by the ratio of (heat in the flue gas) divided by (heat emitted through furnace surfaces)!
    Sorry, I made a mistake here. It should have read "and the total conversion efficiency by (heat emitted through furnace surfaces) divided by the (heat stored in the fuel burned), i.e. (heat used for heating the house) divided by (heat supplied as fuel). Heat that goes out through the flue is wasted - unless you consider it as the energy that moves oxygen into the furnace to maintain combustion and combustion gases out through the flue.

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    wizard69's Tools
    That is one nice rocket stove build. Great video too! This is actually something I could use myself, might be a good spring build.

    By the way that meal at the end look to be fantastic.

    Quote Originally Posted by PowerMk View Post
    Hello guys . Hello guys yesterday I finished my new Rocket Stove. I had a simple rocket stove but I wanted something bigger and better so I decided to make a new one.I worked hard because I really need it . I m often going for camping , fishing and this stove is useful for me especially for fishing!!!
    In the feature I will make some accessories so give me your ideas.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post
    That is one nice rocket stove build. Great video too! This is actually something I could use myself, might be a good spring build.

    By the way that meal at the end look to be fantastic.
    I will post the dimension here when I have free time.
    Thank you very much for your kind words !!!

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