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Thread: Chop saw cutting thick round stock - GIF

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    Chop saw cutting thick round stock - GIF

    Chop saw cutting thick round stock.




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    Super efficient chop saw - GIF
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    I would lean towards calling it a cold saw. judging by the slow RPMs and the apparent signs there are teeth on the blade and not a consumable friction blade. But I have to wonder why there doesn't seem to be any coolant spray Cumming out of the nozzle positioned in front of the blade
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank S View Post
    I would lean towards calling it a cold saw. judging by the slow RPMs and the apparent signs there are teeth on the blade and not a consumable friction blade. But I have to wonder why there doesn't seem to be any coolant spray Cumming out of the nozzle positioned in front of the blade
    Might be that it is just air to control the chips...

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    Yeah, from watching videos of various objects being fabricated from structural steel, I've often wondered why there is no coolant. It seems like the blade, though presumably designed to be used dry, would dull quickly. I usually use my portable bandsaw or my abrasive chop saw.
    Stupid is forever, ignorance can be fixed.

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    I have used abrasive cutoff saws for years, clearly this isn't one of those.

    I bought one of the Evo cold cut saws, piece of junk, problem is with the clamp and the way the back of the vise is built. Made about a dozen cuts and the blade is worn out. I looked at the cuts and repeatability of cuts and using a setup where I had excellent coltrol of the process, the saw/clamp/vise/blade were the only variables. My abrasive cutoff saw did beter than the evo.

    Bought a Makita - oh my - it is a pleasure to use. Clamp/vise are well designed, the blade is stiffer. I have made hundreds of cuts (probably over 700) on the same blade and it is just fantasic. I have cut many shapes - round/flat/plate/T-bar/bolts/rebar/etc. I even used it to cut a PTO drive shaft to length. The cuts are flat and straight. I have repeatability to less than 1/32" and I could probably make it more with a better stop for the material.

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    A cold saw is typically 150 rpm for aluminium and 75 for steel using coolant. I would think this is a carbide dry cut and the heat is carried away in the chips. I used to have a friction saw 22'' diameter at 3600 rpm, tungsten alloy blade.



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