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Thread: Cutting open a bag of insulation - GIF

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    Cutting open a bag of insulation - GIF

    Cutting open a bag of insulation.




    Previously:

    Insulation hanger/stuffer - photo

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    Apparently they make fibreglass insulation so it dissolves in your lungs now. The older pink stuff was chemically stable and would just stay in there forever and (allegedly) give you mesothelioma. Interesting stuff.

    Belinda Carr has a spectacular Youtube channel where she goes over all this stuff. There are a ton of different building products reviewed with no BS and she doesn't pull any punches.



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    Quote Originally Posted by nova_robotics View Post
    Apparently they make fibreglass insulation so it dissolves in your lungs now. The older pink stuff was chemically stable and would just stay in there forever and (allegedly) give you mesothelioma. Interesting stuff.

    Belinda Carr has a spectacular Youtube channel where she goes over all this stuff. There are a ton of different building products reviewed with no BS and she doesn't pull any punches.



    It would be an interesting conversation that convinces me of the solubility of glass fibers.
    Last edited by mwmkravchenko; Jan 18, 2022 at 07:15 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mwmkravchenko View Post
    It would be an interesting conversation that convinces me of the solubility of glass fibers.
    Regular glass as we know it (soda-lime glass) has additives so it won't dissolve in water. Soda-lime glass has lime added for that very reason. Soda glass will literally dissolve in water.

    Whereas pure silica has excellent resistance to thermal shock, being able to survive immersion in water while red hot, its high melting temperature (1723 C) and viscosity make it difficult to work with. Other substances are therefore added to simplify processing. One is the "soda", or sodium carbonate (Na2CO3), which lowers the glass-transition temperature. However, the soda makes the glass water-soluble, which is usually undesirable. To provide for better chemical durability, the "lime" is also added.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soda%E2%80%93lime_glass

    Apparently fibreglass insulation now also has other additives such as calcium to make it more soluble.

    A 1998 study using rats found that the biopersistence of synthetic fibers after one year was 0.04–13%, but 27% for amosite asbestos. Fibers that persisted longer were found to be more carcinogenic.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glass_fiber

    Am I convinced? Not really. But I'll admit that I'm half-way convinced. But the fibreglass industry was peeved off enough at Belinda Carr's first fibreglass insulation video (where she had suggested health implications) that they contacted her directly and she made a follow-up video. Am I going to snort a line of fibreglass insulation? Nope. Am I still going to wear an N95 mask? Probably. Do I feel slightly safer around the stuff? Yes.

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    hey this smart gal is single , didnt see any rings on her fingers,,!!!! pm me anytime belinda..

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    Quote Originally Posted by nova_robotics View Post
    Regular glass as we know it (soda-lime glass) has additives so it won't dissolve in water. Soda-lime glass has lime added for that very reason. Soda glass will literally dissolve in water.



    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soda%E2%80%93lime_glass

    Apparently fibreglass insulation now also has other additives such as calcium to make it more soluble.



    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glass_fiber

    Am I convinced? Not really. But I'll admit that I'm half-way convinced. But the fibreglass industry was peeved off enough at Belinda Carr's first fibreglass insulation video (where she had suggested health implications) that they contacted her directly and she made a follow-up video. Am I going to snort a line of fibreglass insulation? Nope. Am I still going to wear an N95 mask? Probably. Do I feel slightly safer around the stuff? Yes.
    I understand the Soda part. Not that stupid!

    I use Rockwool. For a few of the reasons that she mentions. And masks are a good idea. I admit to not using them very much as a young man. Defionitely do now.

    Owens Corning definitely makes rigid Fiberglass panels as does Rockwool.

    I liked her presentation methods. Concise and to the point.

    Oh and she's cute to! Gotta dream sometimes

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    Quote Originally Posted by mwmkravchenko View Post
    I understand the Soda part. Not that stupid!
    I dunno. I didn't know that. I guess I am that stupid.

    Quote Originally Posted by mwmkravchenko View Post
    I use Rockwool. For a few of the reasons that she mentions. And masks are a good idea. I admit to not using them very much as a young man. Defionitely do now.
    Right there with ya. Rockwool is a spectacular product. I did my basement with Rockwool. It's a toss up between Roxul and blown-in cellulose for my favourite insulation. I like that cellulose has boron salts so you can add fireproofing, convince the rodents to move out, and insulate a building space all in one shot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nova_robotics View Post
    I dunno. I didn't know that. I guess I am that stupid.



    Right there with ya. Rockwool is a spectacular product. I did my basement with Rockwool. It's a toss up between Roxul and blown-in cellulose for my favourite insulation. I like that cellulose has boron salts so you can add fireproofing, convince the rodents to move out, and insulate a building space all in one shot.
    "I didn't know that. I guess I am that stupid."

    The video even told us this!

    I checked up on glass making a few times. Very fascinating.

    Cellulose is nice. And I have used it. But there is epic compaction and R value losses. We would do an R 32 Rockwool and then blow over another 18 inches of Cellulose. Gave nearly R 50. Nothing to sneeze at.

    Did you stop your basement insulation 16 inches from the floor?

    Reasons why:

    Flood damages. Will not wick water up. Most basement floods are 12 inches or less.
    No gain on the insulation effects below frost level. If you are on the east coast there is not very deep frost. Prairie provinces a different story but even there the building code calls for 16" above the floor. As it also calls for vapor barrier on the exterior and the interior of the basement walls. That was a recommendation in my code which is about 18 years old. I think that became part of the national building code.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nova_robotics View Post
    I dunno. I didn't know that. I guess I am that stupid.



    Right there with ya. Rockwool is a spectacular product. I did my basement with Rockwool. It's a toss up between Roxul and blown-in cellulose for my favourite insulation. I like that cellulose has boron salts so you can add fireproofing, convince the rodents to move out, and insulate a building space all in one shot.
    Belinda even mentioned it.

    I remembered about that from Corning glass information that I read and then later watched a few fairly in depth videos about glass production properties.

    Agree on both types of insulation.

    If you are a contractor and simply looking to fulfill minimum to code specs then sure use the fiberglass. If you are thinking long term that is a whole other situation. The last place that we built we did an R 32 of Rockwool and then another 18 inches of cellulose over top of that. Roughly R 50.

    In your basement did you leave about 16 inches of no insulation at the bottom? Well 14 1/2 actually counting the bottom plate.

    This was a recommendation in the building code that I had from 2002. Same for vapour barrier on the exterior side of a basement wall as well as the interior of the basement wall. I'm not sure if that was raised to the level of full national building code practice.

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    Ev-en-tually (taken too long already) this ceiling will be drywalled. Very next project will blow-in as much rockwool possible, figuratively speaking. Pitch height gives plenyty of room, over 11', at 4:12 eaves too shallow to crawl in and lay blankets. Using 10 hollow core doors that will be 'attic' access panels, they'll get blanket material.
    No conceivable reason for anyone up there again.
    Would like to utilize some of that, but we get some real cold periods. Not Arctic Circle grade, but...
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

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