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Thread: Drawknife

  1. #1
    Supporting Member Philip Davies's Avatar
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    Drawknife

    Drawknife-0bd14dc4-ffcf-4b37-bd7d-99a94303f577.jpeg
    This is the first time I have forged any tool from an old file, so I approached hardening with some trepidation. Because it could break or distort. Using a process described in “Practical Blacksmithing” (ed MT Richardson, pub. 1891), I used linseed oil, which gave it a very attractive shiny black, but of course, to temper it, I had to grind it back a bit and polish it somewhat. Then I laid it on a red hot steel bar I had bent to the curve along the back to draw it to, mostly brown, with touches of purple, before sharpening. It is not especially attractive, or refined, but I do not mind so long as it retains an edge and does not break. That it is so obviously homemade shows some accomplishment, I think. The blade is 8” long & 7/8” wide. Drawknife-image.jpg
    The handles are salvaged from the bottom of a chest of drawers. I like this style, and is fitted to short tangs.

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  2. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Philip Davies For This Useful Post:

    baja (Jun 23, 2021), Frank S (Jun 22, 2021), Jon (Jun 24, 2021), Toolmaker51 (Jun 22, 2021), WmRMeyers (Jun 22, 2021)

  3. #2
    Supporting Member WmRMeyers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Philip Davies View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	0BD14DC4-FFCF-4B37-BD7D-99A94303F577.jpeg 
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    This is the first time I have forged any tool from an old file, so I approached hardening with some trepidation. Because it could break or distort. Using a process described in “Practical Blacksmithing” (ed MT Richardson, pub. 1891), I used linseed oil, which gave it a very attractive shiny black, but of course, to temper it, I had to grind it back a bit and polish it somewhat. Then I laid it on a red hot steel bar I had bent to the curve along the back to draw it to, mostly brown, with touches of purple, before sharpening. It is not especially attractive, or refined, but I do not mind so long as it retains an edge and does not break. That it is so obviously homemade shows some accomplishment, I think. The blade is 8” long & 7/8” wide. Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	39885
    The handles are salvaged from the bottom of a chest of drawers. I like this style, and is fitted to short tangs.
    I have been doing a bit of blacksmithing here and there for over 56 years. I've never attempted anything quite so complex, nor had quite so nice a result. I think you did quite well! I look forward to your next blacksmithing project!

    Bill

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    Philip Davies (Jun 22, 2021)

  5. #3
    Supporting Member Philip Davies's Avatar
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    Thank you kindly, Bill.

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    Supporting Member WmRMeyers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Philip Davies View Post
    Thank you kindly, Bill.
    I'm simply recognizing a craftsman. No thanks necessary! You do nice work, sir. And showing something like this might encourage someone (like me!) to branch out a bit from hooks and trivets and such to something truly useful. The ability to make specialized tools is the real difference between humans and animals.

    Bill

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    Philip Davies (Jun 23, 2021)

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    Supporting Member Toolmaker51's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WmRMeyers View Post
    The ability to make specialized tools is the real difference between humans and animals.
    Bill
    For the most part true. Yet primates and others have been proven to select materials directly for use as implements; further on, certain animal societies learn and teach improvements beyond raw material.
    Both of those; the very core of toolmaking.
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

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    Supporting Member WmRMeyers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toolmaker51 View Post
    For the most part true. Yet primates and others have been proven to select materials directly for use as implements; further on, certain animal societies learn and teach improvements beyond raw material.
    Both of those; the very core of toolmaking.
    Primates, elephants, and certain birds, among those known to me do select and use objects to make simple tools. I'm not sure if they adjust the length of the object to better suit their purpose, but we certainly do a considerable amount of modification. All you have to do is look at a Saturn V rocket to see some of the lengths we'll go to, to improve our tools. I wonder what birds & elephants could do with opposable thumbs.

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    Supporting Member Frank S's Avatar
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    Animals will use objects as defensive and offensive weapons as well so man is not even alone in that respect.
    Elephants have been known to up root small trees to use for warding off an attacking pride of lions
    Never try to tell me it can't be done
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    Supporting Member WmRMeyers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank S View Post
    Animals will use objects as defensive and offensive weapons as well so man is not even alone in that respect.
    Elephants have been known to up root small trees to use for warding off an attacking pride of lions
    But do they modify the objects to make them work better, or do they just use what they can find. And do they find one they like, and carry it with them when they move from place to place? I cannot guarantee that they do not for either of those questions, but I've not seen evidence of it. We most certainly do.

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    Supporting Member mklotz's Avatar
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    Crows are some of the most clever birds. Here are some others...

    https://www.birdwatchingdaily.com/ne...rld-use-tools/

    and a crow assembling a tool and using it...

    ---
    Regards, Marv


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    Toolmaker51 (Jun 23, 2021)

  14. #10
    Supporting Member WmRMeyers's Avatar
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    Cool! I've learned something new today! One of my questions is answered, anyway. Now to find the answer to one more...

    Thanks Marv!

    Bill

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