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Thread: Finishing the Working End of a Plastic Woven Line

  1. #11
    Supporting Member Frank S's Avatar
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    Rick it looks like you have created a solution which is the best of both worlds.
    The way I have done it was to slide the shrink tubing until the very tip end of the rope was flush with the end of the tubing then using the little disposable butane torch to heat he end fibers of the rope first melting them from center out then heat the tubing.
    Shrink tubing also comes in many varying grades and thicknesses I like the thicker grades but not with dielectric grease in it as that just reduces the bond to near nothing good for electrical cables in corrosive environment but not for serving the ends of nylon or fibrous ropes.
    I also use the thick tubing for covering the wire ends of small steel cables or when back weaving a loop if for nothing else but to make the end appear more finished and neater looking

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    Supporting Member Sleykin's Avatar
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    I normally wrap the rope with electrical tape before i cut it and then either cut it with my big weller soldering gun that fuses the rope as it cuts or I cut it with a knife and then burn the ends. The tape holds it in place and is easy to remove if you like.

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    I just melt it and when it starts to burn wipe it down with a a rag with a twist if it is a layed rope. Leaves a pointy end that can be snipped of close if needed. Never had a rope done like this fray. I'm a big fan off whipping as well and a two part whip for a loop is incredibly strong. Sometimes I will paint some 'liquid tape' over the whip for a bit of extra protection.

  4. #14
    Supporting Member desbromilow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank S View Post
    Rick it looks like you have created a solution which is the best of both worlds.
    The way I have done it was to slide the shrink tubing until the very tip end of the rope was flush with the end of the tubing then using the little disposable butane torch to heat he end fibers of the rope first melting them from center out then heat the tubing.
    Shrink tubing also comes in many varying grades and thicknesses I like the thicker grades but not with dielectric grease in it as that just reduces the bond to near nothing good for electrical cables in corrosive environment but not for serving the ends of nylon or fibrous ropes.
    I also use the thick tubing for covering the wire ends of small steel cables or when back weaving a loop if for nothing else but to make the end appear more finished and neater looking
    Frank,

    have you considered using glue lined heatshrink tubing? it's predominantly used in electrical work, but the inside of the tubing is coated with a layer of hot melt glue. As the tube shrinks, it squeezes glue into the fibres of the rope, and seals it all together. If you leave about 4mm of excess tubing past the end of the rope prior to heating it, the unsupported tip of the tubing will shrink further down creating a blunt point, which is filled with clear glue firming it up.
    Often limited in colours (I only tend to see black tubing) but it is quite strong, and works well on ropes which don't melt (thinking sisal or other natural fibres)

    HTH,
    Des

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    Sleykin (Sep 9, 2020)

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    Thanks rgsparber! We've added your Woven Plastic Line Finishing Method to our Miscellaneous category,
    as well as to your builder page: rgsparber's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:




  7. #16
    Supporting Member Drew1966's Avatar
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    If you cut the rope quickly with a red hot blade, the ends seal themselves with no fraying.

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    i must be doing it all wrong. I use shrink tube on the line at the point I will cut - before cutting. Shrinks up tight then cut the line and tube at the same time.

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    Drew1966 (Sep 13, 2020)

  10. #18
    Supporting Member rgsparber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick79 View Post
    i must be doing it all wrong. I use shrink tube on the line at the point I will cut - before cutting. Shrinks up tight then cut the line and tube at the same time.
    Nick,

    I'm the one doing it wrong. When I tried shrink tubing, my heat gun did strink the tubing, but it did not melt the line. Then the tubing just fell off. I must be missing something here.

    Rick
    Rick

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    I always just wrapped the rope with a shop rag a few inches from the end. Heat the end with some handy heat source till it shows signs of melting, and immediately pull it through the cloth while rolling it between my fingers to make the end spiral through the cloth.

  12. #20
    Supporting Member rgsparber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baddog View Post
    I always just wrapped the rope with a shop rag a few inches from the end. Heat the end with some handy heat source till it shows signs of melting, and immediately pull it through the cloth while rolling it between my fingers to make the end spiral through the cloth.
    Baddog,

    Can you post a picture?

    Thanks,

    Rick
    Last edited by rgsparber; Sep 14, 2020 at 01:10 PM.
    Rick

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