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Thread: A Homemade Expanding Anchor

  1. #1
    Supporting Member rgsparber's Avatar
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    rgsparber's Tools

    A Homemade Expanding Anchor

    My local hardware store has a modest selection of expanding anchors. If I am free to drill the required hole, these anchors work great. But there are times when the hole exists and I just need to be able to thread in a bolt. That is where it is nice to be able to make my own anchor. The design presented here is not as strong as the store-bought variety.

    If you are interested, please see

    https://rick.sparber.org/anchor.pdf

    Your comments are welcome. All of us are smarter than any one of us.

    Thanks,

    Rick
    Rick

  2. The Following 12 Users Say Thank You to rgsparber For This Useful Post:

    Altair (10-30-2019), baja (11-01-2019), bigjulie (11-29-2019), Carnel (11-01-2019), DIYSwede (10-31-2019), jdurand (10-30-2019), JoeVanGeaux (10-31-2019), Jon (10-31-2019), Lee Bell (10-31-2019), Little Rabbit (11-03-2019), Seedtick (10-31-2019), Tuomas (11-01-2019)

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    Supporting Member mklotz's Avatar
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    mklotz's Tools
    This type of anchor works well to fix things to the outboard end of the bore of the lathe spindle. Examples of "things" might be a dividing disk or a hand crank for threading up to a shoulder.

    Done with square-section stock one can make fences that lock into the T-slots on a machine. For example...

    Miniature milling table accessories
    Last edited by mklotz; 10-30-2019 at 03:49 PM.
    ---
    Regards, Marv


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    Thanks rgsparber! We've added your Expanding Anchor to our Fastening category,
    as well as to your builder page: rgsparber's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:




  6. #4
    Supporting Member rgsparber's Avatar
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    rgsparber's Tools
    I suspect the genesis of this anchor was from seeing an attachment to a lathe. It might have been in the Bedside Reader series.

    A spreading anchor for a T slot sounds very useful. Do have to be careful not to force the top of the slot since it could chip out.

    An adjustable parallel is a close cousin.

    Thanks Marv!

    Rick
    Rick

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    Lee Bell's Avatar
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    It has worked just fine in millions of bicycles over the years all over the world to hold the handlebars tight too.

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  9. #6
    Supporting Member jdurand's Avatar
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    jdurand's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by rgsparber View Post
    I suspect the genesis of this anchor was from seeing an attachment to a lathe. It might have been in the Bedside Reader series.

    A spreading anchor for a T slot sounds very useful. Do have to be careful not to force the top of the slot since it could chip out.

    An adjustable parallel is a close cousin.

    Thanks Marv!

    Rick
    I made my lathe attachment based on bicycle handlebars.

    Here's the handwheel attachment for the lathe.

    A Homemade Expanding Anchor-hand_wheel_1.jpg

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    rgsparber (11-02-2019)

  11. #7
    Supporting Member Crusty's Avatar
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    Hey Marv,

    The best way to thread up to a shoulder is to run the chuck and lead screw in reverse with the threading tool mounted on center but upside down in the toolpost. You start threading at the shoulder and feed outwards to the end of the part and so don't have to worry about crashes.

    If the chuck and the lead screw rotate the same direction it will be a right hand thread - if opposite directions then it will be a left hand thread.
    If you can't make it precise make it adjustable.

  12. #8
    Supporting Member mklotz's Avatar
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    mklotz's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by Crusty View Post
    Hey Marv,

    The best way to thread up to a shoulder is to run the chuck and lead screw in reverse with the threading tool mounted on center but upside down in the toolpost. You start threading at the shoulder and feed outwards to the end of the part and so don't have to worry about crashes.

    If the chuck and the lead screw rotate the same direction it will be a right hand thread - if opposite directions then it will be a left hand thread.
    As far as I am concerned, a thread to a shoulder is just an indication of a bad design. In years of building stuff, I've never had occasion to need to do it. It's almost always possible to arrange things so conventional fasteners can be used.

    Besides, my lathe has a screw-on chuck so cuts while it's running in reverse aren't the best idea.
    Last edited by mklotz; 11-01-2019 at 08:57 AM.
    ---
    Regards, Marv


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    Supporting Member Tuomas's Avatar
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    Tuomas's Tools
    Great tip.
    That works nicely if you want to make telescopic builds and need a solution to lock parts to desired position / lenght.

    Thanks!


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