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Thread: Induction brazing carbide tip to saw blade - GIF

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    Induction brazing carbide tip to saw blade - GIF


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    Carbide saw blades are no different than lathe carbide insert cut off/ parting tools. No matter how careful you are, saw blades and cut off tolls with carbide attachments will break from even the slightest shocks till you reach the point to say: Enough is enough, and go back to abrasive cut off discs, and find alternative methods to cut off/part on the lathe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mansworld View Post
    Carbide saw blades are no different than lathe carbide insert cut off/ parting tools. No matter how careful you are, saw blades and cut off tolls with carbide attachments will break from even the slightest shocks till you reach the point to say: Enough is enough, and go back to abrasive cut off discs, and find alternative methods to cut off/part on the lathe.
    You should try using abrasive disks to cut aluminum sometime, then you will go back to using carbide blades
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank S View Post
    You should try using abrasive disks to cut aluminum sometime, then you will go back to using carbide blades
    I use a stationary power hacksaw to cut aluminum, and a corded/cordless reciprocating power saw elsewhere. Whence you loose few carbide teeth from the carbide brazed blade you start getting vibration and erratic cuts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mansworld View Post
    I use a stationary power hacksaw to cut aluminum, and a corded/cordless reciprocating power saw elsewhere. Whence you loose few carbide teeth from the carbide brazed blade you start getting vibration and erratic cuts.
    Mostly the aluminum I cut is either trailer floor planking or extrusions. The planking is an extrusion that is about 6 inches wide with small 1-inch tall I beam like protrusions the other extruded pieces are of my own design, Had to pay nearly 20 K for the dies and a minimum first-time order of 5000 linier feet A bandsaw or power hack saw takes forever to cut likewise a saber or Sawzall.
    I have a 12-inch Pro-Shop miter saw with a 96 tooth metal cutting carbide blade, it takes about a minute to make a couple dozen cuts, so far have only made a little over 500 cuts with the blade but it still cuts the same as when I installed it. Clean square cuts every time. I have a Black and Decker worm drive circular saw with an 8 1/4inch metal cutting carbide blade, for when I have to rip the planks been using the same blade for a couple years. Have never lost a tooth on either one yet. But my 7 1/4" circular saw that I use for wood will burn through carbide crosscut blades regularly. the longevity of a carbide blade depends on a couple factors #1 the quality of the blade and #2 the amount of heat that builds up during a cut. The miter saw slices through so fast there is hardly any time for heat to build up, For the rip saw I set it so its depth is just slightly more than the thickness of the top of the planks.
    If I need to cut aluminum bar stock or tubing on my band saw I spray the blade occasionally with an aerosol wax and have a rotary wire brush mounted after the guide rollers to clean the teeth.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank S View Post
    Mostly the aluminum I cut is either trailer floor planking or extrusions. The planking is an extrusion that is about 6 inches wide with small 1-inch tall I beam like protrusions the other extruded pieces are of my own design, Had to pay nearly 20 K for the dies and a minimum first-time order of 5000 linier feet A bandsaw or power hack saw takes forever to cut likewise a saber or Sawzall.
    I have a 12-inch Pro-Shop miter saw with a 96 tooth metal cutting carbide blade, it takes about a minute to make a couple dozen cuts, so far have only made a little over 500 cuts with the blade but it still cuts the same as when I installed it. Clean square cuts every time. I have a Black and Decker worm drive circular saw with an 8 1/4inch metal cutting carbide blade, for when I have to rip the planks been using the same blade for a couple years. Have never lost a tooth on either one yet. But my 7 1/4" circular saw that I use for wood will burn through carbide crosscut blades regularly. the longevity of a carbide blade depends on a couple factors #1 the quality of the blade and #2 the amount of heat that builds up during a cut. The miter saw slices through so fast there is hardly any time for heat to build up, For the rip saw I set it so its depth is just slightly more than the thickness of the top of the planks.
    If I need to cut aluminum bar stock or tubing on my band saw I spray the blade occasionally with an aerosol wax and have a rotary wire brush mounted after the guide rollers to clean the teeth.
    Carbide blades can tolerate soft metals and you can cut aluminum forever without losing a single carbide tooth. But when it comes to cut steel with carbide disc blade, it's something else. Most the stock I cut are steel, and my experience to cut steel with carbide disc blades was not pleasant one and not cheap either.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mansworld View Post
    Carbide blades can tolerate soft metals and you can cut aluminum forever without losing a single carbide tooth. But when it comes to cut steel with carbide disc blade, it's something else. Most the stock I cut are steel, and my experience to cut steel with carbide disc blades was not pleasant one and not cheap either.
    When cutting steel with carbide disk blades the RPMs, heat and feed rates are a big factor in how long they will last a low RPM cold saw with flooded coolant is best
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank S View Post
    When cutting steel with carbide disk blades the RPMs, heat and feed rates are a big factor in how long they will last a low RPM cold saw with flooded coolant is best
    I was aware of the low RPM issue of the carbide blades. It makes a lot of very sharp little chips that embed in rubber and plastic materials like air hoses, electric cables and caster wheels. A special hood need to be fabricated to contains the sharp swarf. Some of the good things I like about the carbide blades are the absence of heat and sparks, immediately following the cut, the steel stuck is cool to touch! When I noticed that the blade was losing 1 to 2 tooth/teeth per cut; despite all precautions to avoid shocks, that was the end of my encounter with carbide blades in the steel cutting department. The single point carbide parting/cutting of tool on the lathe met a similar fate.



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