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Thread: Internal Stock Stop for the Mini Lathe

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    dgbreggin's Tools

    Internal Stock Stop for the Mini Lathe

    I needed stock depth stop capability for my mini lathe. I designed and built both an internal and an external stop. (I'll do a write-up the external stop at a later time.) The internal stop is secured in the end of lathe spindle, and has a rod that can be set to almost any depth inside the spindle or chuck.

    This picture shows all the various pieces.

    Internal Stock Stop for the Mini Lathe-kit.jpg

    The sleeve is made from steel round bar. It is secured by a tapered bar drawn into the matching taper inside one end of the sleeve. The small diameter of the sleeve is turned to be a good slip fit in the spindle. The larger diameter fits through the hole in the change gear cover with a shoulder that rests on the end of the spindle. The expansion slits were cut on the mini mill using a thin slitting saw. I machined a pair of flats on the outer end of the sleeve so that a wrench can be used to hold it while the nut on the draw bar is tightened.

    Internal Stock Stop for the Mini Lathe-sleeve-2.jpg Internal Stock Stop for the Mini Lathe-sleeve-1.jpg

    The draw bar is made from a common 3/8" bolt. I turned the head into a taper using the lathe. I drilled a 1/4" clearance hole most of the way through the bolt, and drilled and tapped about 1/2" in the threaded end to fit the 1/4-20 threaded rod used as the depth stop.

    Internal Stock Stop for the Mini Lathe-bolt-bar-1.jpg Internal Stock Stop for the Mini Lathe-bolt-bar-2.jpg

    Internal Stock Stop for the Mini Lathe-bolt-bar-3.jpg Internal Stock Stop for the Mini Lathe-draw-bar.jpg

    To install into the lathe... First the draw bar is inserted into the sleeve and held loosely by the washer and flanged nut. The sleeve is inserted into the spindle with the shoulder seated on the end of the spindle, and the nut is tightened to expand and secure the sleeve. Finally, a suitable length of threaded rod is threaded into the draw bar to set the depth, and a wing nut is used as a jam nut to secure the threaded rod position.

    Internal Stock Stop for the Mini Lathe-installed-1.jpg Internal Stock Stop for the Mini Lathe-installed-2.jpg
    Internal Stock Stop for the Mini Lathe-installed-3.jpg Internal Stock Stop for the Mini Lathe-installed-4.jpg

    The stop is balanced well enough that it can be left in place while operating the lathe.

    If a longer piece is being machined, a shorter length of threaded rod can be used so that the exposed portion doesn't whip around as the lathe runs.

    Once set, the stop can be removed and reinstalled later using the shoulder to re-index the stop location. (This assumes that the nut torque is somewhat consistent between the repeated installations, and that the threaded rod is not disturbed, of course.)

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  2. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to dgbreggin For This Useful Post:

    Jon (Dec 2, 2022), piper184 (Dec 3, 2022), rlm98253 (Dec 2, 2022), Toolmaker51 (Dec 2, 2022)

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    Thanks dgbreggin! We've added your Internal Stock Stop to our Lathe Accessories category,
    as well as to your builder page: dgbreggin's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:




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    Quote Originally Posted by dgbreggin View Post
    I needed stock depth stop capability for my mini lathe. I designed and built both an internal and an external stop..........snipped.........
    Once set, the stop can be removed and reinstalled later using the shoulder to re-index the stop location. (This assumes that the nut torque is somewhat consistent between the repeated installations, and that the threaded rod is not disturbed, of course.)
    On a mini-lathe I want to point out. You have no idea how many full size lathes, in full-on commercial shops, taking in serious work at considerable per hour rates, at the hands of 'dedicated' machinists have no spindle stops for any of their lathes.
    It's hard for me to look at any lathe and not envision how to arrange a stop. It's harder yet to find a milling machine not fitted with a table stop; why are lathes not regarded equally.
    Always the same reply; "shop tooling is wasteful use of man hours", or "it won't get used, just lost".

    Well, it would still be productive today IF BUILT WHEN RATES WERE LOWER, and anything getting second operations or just a few handfuls of multiple parts would have paid for it over and over again.
    Tools getting lost are accountability issues, past or future.
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to Toolmaker51 For This Useful Post:

    piper184 (Dec 3, 2022)

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    dgbreggin's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by Toolmaker51 View Post
    On a mini-lathe I want to point out. You have no idea how many full size lathes, in full-on commercial shops, taking in serious work at considerable per hour rates, at the hands of 'dedicated' machinists have no spindle stops for any of their lathes.
    It's hard for me to look at any lathe and not envision how to arrange a stop. It's harder yet to find a milling machine not fitted with a table stop; why are lathes not regarded equally.
    Always the same reply; "shop tooling is wasteful use of man hours", or "it won't get used, just lost".

    Well, it would still be productive today IF BUILT WHEN RATES WERE LOWER, and anything getting second operations or just a few handfuls of multiple parts would have paid for it over and over again.
    Tools getting lost are accountability issues, past or future.
    I couldn't agree more. I learned long ago that making a jig or fixture is rarely a waste. A cleverly designed jig or fixture can often be used for many similar jobs, and will likely save time overall. Even if rarely used, it can significantly improve the quality / precision of the work.

    I recently made good use of this internal stop when I was making parts for the external stop (that I will post in the near future). Ironically, I had no thoughts about making an external stop when I made the internal stop more than a year ago.



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  7. The Following User Says Thank You to dgbreggin For This Useful Post:

    Toolmaker51 (Dec 3, 2022)

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