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Thread: Make A Retractable Caster For Metal Bench

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    Supporting Member Kwandotechnic's Avatar
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    Kwandotechnic's Tools

    Make A Retractable Caster For Metal Bench

    Dear you all,
    Today I would like to introduce how to Build An Retractable Caster For Metal Bench.
    It helps Metal Bench Easy to Change Working Status Or Moving.
    I hope you all feel interested in my video.
    Please like and subscribe to watch new videos!
    Thank you so much!
    Kwando.

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    asterix (Jan 9, 2022), IAMSatisfied (Jan 9, 2022), lassab999 (Jan 5, 2022), mwmkravchenko (Jan 8, 2022)

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    Cool project! I have seen guys tack weld with TIG, but never weld without a filler rod. Interesting.

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    Thanks Kwandotechnic! We've added your Retractable Casters to our Workbenches category,
    as well as to your builder page: Kwandotechnic's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:




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    Supporting Member mwmkravchenko's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rdarrylb View Post
    Cool project! I have seen guys tack weld with TIG, but never weld without a filler rod. Interesting.
    I'm watching it. There's no way that he is making those TIG welds without filler. Secondly he is welding on to galvanized steel not good for welding porosity. Or for him either. Zinc oxide is toxic. He is using filler and editing it out.

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    rdarrylb (Jan 8, 2022)

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    True on the galvanized and toxic fumes. Only welded some once (stick weld), and I made sure to grind all that off first! No fumes and better weld. Yeah was wondering about the filler, as I have used it eons ago with oxy-acetylene welding.

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    Supporting Member Saltfever's Avatar
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    Fusion welding is fast, strong, cost effective, and clean. It is very common and is used whenever the various parameters of the joint allow it. Eg, thickness, gap, alloy, etc. (to many to list here). There is nothing more cost effective because there is no consumable (eg., tungsten, or rod) and it is very quick to set up. It is quite strong because you are using only the parent metals which flow together readily and no added rod of mystery alloy. The only downside is the HAZ. But HAZ is one of the variables to consider and fusion wouldn't be used if contraindicated. I agree there may be editing involved (some of the stitch welds appear to have rod added) but TIG tacking with no rod is an everyday occurrence. Fusion was most common with acetylene welding but quickly adopted for TIG.

    PS: I have set up sheet metal seams many feet/meters long to be ONLY fusion welded. First used many moons ago with oxy-acetylene and currently with TIG.
    Last edited by Saltfever; Jan 8, 2022 at 07:59 PM.

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    Supporting Member mwmkravchenko's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saltfever View Post
    Fusion welding is fast, strong, cost effective, and clean. It is very common and is used whenever the various parameters of the joint allow it. Eg, thickness, gap, alloy, etc. (to many to list here). There is nothing more cost effective because there is no consumable (eg., tungsten, or rod) and it is very quick to set up. It is quite strong because you are using only the parent metals which flow together readily and no added rod of mystery alloy. The only downside is the HAZ. But HAZ is one of the variables to consider and fusion wouldn't be used if contraindicated. I agree there may be editing involved (some of the stitch welds appear to have rod added) but TIG tacking with no rod is an everyday occurrence. Fusion was most common with acetylene welding but quickly adopted for TIG.

    PS: I have set up sheet metal seams many feet/meters long to be ONLY fusion welded. First used many moons ago with oxy-acetylene and currently with TIG.
    I agree it's completely possible. Just not with the fitments shown in this video. If everything was tight and close fitting sure TIG with no filler rod.

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    Supporting Member Saltfever's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mwmkravchenko View Post
    edit . . . Just not with the fitments shown in this video. If everything was tight and close fitting sure TIG with no filler rod.
    Go to 4:51 and SLOW down your viewing speed to 25%. Look carefully at his Left hand. He is steadying his torch hand with it and NOT holding any filler rod. Yet, he is running a continuous bead. It requires some skill but is quite easily done. You concentrate your heat on the thicker (upper) metal and let it flow and fuse to the thinner lower metal. Zinc, as mentioned, complicates (or contaminates) the weld and usually results in poor quality or cosmetics. However, the weld is on the underside facing the floor and will never be seen. I doubt he cares about the looks if he can stay out of the hospital!
    Last edited by Saltfever; Jan 9, 2022 at 01:32 AM. Reason: spelling

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    Supporting Member mwmkravchenko's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saltfever View Post
    Go to 4:51 and SLOW down your viewing speed to 25%. Look carefully at his Left hand. He is steadying his torch hand with it and NOT holding any filler rod. Yet, he is running a continuous bead. It requires some skill but is quite easily done. You concentrate your heat on the thicker (upper) metal and let it flow and fuse to the thinner lower metal. Zinc, as mentioned, complicates (or contaminates) the weld and usually results in poor quality or cosmetics. However, the weld is on the underside facing the floor and will never be seen. I doubt he cares about the looks if he can stay out of the hospital!
    I'll check it out. Again I agree that you can pull metal from thick to thinner areas. I am not a real professional welder but I have worked daily at Welding off and on using MIG and stick. My longest everyday all day stint was for amonth.very Occasionally gas. Gas and TIG are the closest analogs. This gentleman may be a much better welder than I gave him credit for.



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