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Thread: Metric vs. other measurement systems - chart

  1. #171
    Supporting Member Toolmaker51's Avatar
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    You do know, Paramount Ice Rink and Zamboni each put the other on the map. Like so many other SoCal creations.
    The originals were VW powered

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  2. #172
    Jon
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  4. #173
    Supporting Member marksbug's Avatar
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    and this means what??? nothing at all. the unit could be the width of a wall nut. and that would work just fine as long as it was a std nut size.

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    "Earth's circumference has been used to define fundamental units of measurement of length: the nautical mile in the seventeenth century and the metre in the eighteenth"...

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    Supporting Member mwmkravchenko's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon View Post
    OK
    quit making sense. The Americans will have none of it. If it makes sense I mean!

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  10. #176
    Supporting Member marksbug's Avatar
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    you can take a stick and use it for mesurement just as well as a metrick or inch ruler.just watch some of the vids posted hear. I rest my case.

  11. #177
    Supporting Member Toolmaker51's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IntheGroove View Post
    "Earth's circumference has been used to define fundamental units of measurement of length: the nautical mile in the seventeenth century and the metre in the eighteenth"...
    re nautical mile; Actual length is not regarded so often as it's rounded-off figure; to simplify mental calculations, ship handling poses many variables minute by minute.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nautical_mile

    "Historically, it was defined as one minute (1/60 of a degree) of latitude along any line of longitude. Today the international nautical mile is defined as exactly 1852 metres (6076 ft; 1.151 mi). The derived unit of speed is the knot, one nautical mile per hour."
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  12. #178
    Supporting Member marksbug's Avatar
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    my dad tried to teach me them knots. knot times knot is....then he threw in the fighttem's.....fightem knot is knot fighttem too is 10..or some sort of crap I was screwed up till my senior year in highschool when one school day laying on the beach I figured it all out. and he was a engineer....

  13. #179
    Supporting Member rgsparber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marksbug View Post
    you can take a stick and use it for mesurement just as well as a metrick or inch ruler.just watch some of the vids posted hear. I rest my case.
    I agree that the base distance is not important. It is all about the multipliers to get to larger and smaller distances. The choice is, for example, 5280 versus 1000.

    Quick, how many feet in 3.5 miles?

    OK, how many meters in 3.5 KM?

    Rick
    Rick

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  15. #180
    Supporting Member Paul Alciatore's Avatar
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    The English units were made with the NEEDS and CARES of the people in mind.

    That picture makes fun of the divisions of various English units. But, to give just a few examples, and please keep in mind that there were NO COMPUTERS or POCKET CACULATORS or CELL PHONES with APPS in the days when BOTH of these systems were invented.

    A FOOT is divided into 12 inches. Now 12 can be evenly divided by 2, 3, 4, and 6. A meter is usually divided by 10, 100, or 1000 and the prime factors of those numbers are only 2 and 5. The factors of the foot are much more useful when dividing things in every day life.

    The YARD is three feet or 36 inches and it continues the easy division into MORE sizes than the meter does.

    The Pound is 16 ounces and that is divisible by 2, 4, and 8. The KiloGram, like the meter, only has factors of 2 and 5. Again, when dividing things up in everyday life, the pound wins hands down.

    Etc. for almost every English unit. All of the metric units are divided up or combined upwards by factors of 10 which only has factors of 2 and 5. Division by a number as small as 3 is not easily done. In fact, it yields an infinite decimal. Many will say that the math is easier with metric numbers, but there are many instances where that is true of the English system instead.

    While no number is divisible by every smaller number, the multipliers chosen for English units will almost always have a larger number of small numbers that yield EVEN divisions. English units were made to be more useful in every day life and commerce. Metric units were invented by scientists, by intellectuals who saw no problems with using a higher level of elementary arithmetic than the everyday man. The metric system is aligned with our use of numbers of base 10. This itself is due to the accident of nature that produced our bodies with 10 fingers. If we had 8 or 12 fingers, there would be NO metric (based on 10s) system and anyone proposing a system based on number of base 10 would be laughed at just as heartily as someone today who proposed that we change over to a number and measurement systems based on, let me say, numbers of base 7.

    Today, with the common availability of the computational aids that I mentioned above, there is stronger support for the metric system than existed in days past.

    I, myself am one of those scientist/intellectuals but I am not arguing for either system. I am just pointing out one of the real reasons behind their respective creations, actual HUMAN needs and considerations.
    Paul A.

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