Free 173 Best Homemade Tools eBook:  
Become a founding member: 500+ tool plans, full site access, and more.

User Tag List

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 16 of 16

Thread: Moving a drill press table the easy way.

  1. #11
    Supporting Member tonyfoale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    937
    Thanks
    375
    Thanked 1,593 Times in 460 Posts
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    tonyfoale's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by aphilipmarcou View Post
    I am going to my shop right now to sus out my Fobco drill press (Superior British made , similar to Startrite (). The older one gets the heavier these things become..../The older I am the faster I was (old motorcyclist adage)
    Lathe chucks and mill vices have certainly got heavier since I turned 70 a few years back. I thought that it was something to do with the metal structure aging.
    The racing adage is my case is not quite right. It should be a bit more like "The older I am the slower I was but the faster I am". I race better now than I did when I was younger.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The older I get, the better I was

  3. #13
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Posts
    9
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 2 Posts
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My 1936 Rockwell Delta 16" variable speed drill press, with this huge cast iron table, lacked the rack and pinion raising / lowering feature, I picked up a $29 on sale Harbor Freight 4 ton Long (44 inches fully extended) flat bottom hydraulic jack, made a socket to somewhat capture the ram on the underside of the table, and mounted the flat bottom to the drill press bottom foot, added a foot lever pump actuator and a cable release to let the pressure out, and now I can raise and lower the table even with something very heavy mounted to the table.

    I had tried the counter weight set up as described above, but it didn't give me enough control when there was something heavy mounted to the table, so ended up going with the hydraulic jack set up in addition to the counter weight set up, now it's real easy to raise and lower that monster table even with something heavy on it.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    16
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 10 Times in 4 Posts
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'd sure like to see pics of this set-up.

  5. #15
    Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    7
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Cheers on a brilliant idea. I too find myself mostly alone these days to solve problems. Lol . Cheers to you . Thank you for the brilliant idea .

  6. #16
    Supporting Member VinnieL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    259
    Thanks
    28
    Thanked 105 Times in 81 Posts
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have also seen weights made from buckets of concrete. I have an old 1950's Craftsman made by King Seeley Tool Co. that I am going to do something like that to. The inside the column weight is a good idea but I bet it would emit an annoying rattle noise inside the column.


    Post your reply!
    Join 42,532 of us and get 500+ tool plans, tool eBooks, build guides, and much more.



    eBooks for Supporters

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •