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Thread: My first Bridgeport - a Series-1! - and an equally vintage 9x24 South Bend lathe!

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    Supporting Member McDesign's Avatar
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    McDesign's Tools

    My first Bridgeport - a Series-1! - and an equally vintage 9x24 South Bend lathe!

    My first mill - and since I'm a 1963 model, I think it's older than I am! Bought from a Delta Airlines machinist. All-original; BP power feeds, 3-phase BP motor; even the BP vise. Needs to be cleaned, but oil in the lines, not grease, not a lot of visible wear on the ways.

    All works fine and tight; he had been using it and meaning to restore it as a project, but promised his wife he'd try it on Craigslist Atlanta first.
    So I saw it and jumped! Only about 50 miles away. Owner had built a nice 5-hp rotary phase converter for it; more than enough - so now I don't have to discount three-phase tools i run across.

    Also a nice Kamakura rotary table and the big 90-degree mount. Decent amount of tooling; full set of collets. Local place rigged it.
    My first Bridgeport - a Series-1! - and an equally vintage 9x24 South Bend lathe!-img_0269.jpg
    My first Bridgeport - a Series-1! - and an equally vintage 9x24 South Bend lathe!-img_0270.jpg
    My first Bridgeport - a Series-1! - and an equally vintage 9x24 South Bend lathe!-img_0274.jpg

    I'm tight on space, so had to angle it. Got it shimmed level and re-set the head.
    My first Bridgeport - a Series-1! - and an equally vintage 9x24 South Bend lathe!-img_0283.jpg

    This is Georgia, so plumb in the dehumidifier permanently!
    My first Bridgeport - a Series-1! - and an equally vintage 9x24 South Bend lathe!-img_0573.jpg

    Phase converter - lathe will go to the right of it - though it's single-phase
    My first Bridgeport - a Series-1! - and an equally vintage 9x24 South Bend lathe!-img_0575.jpg

    Lathe - will also be fun to prettify, but all works and is tight and no visible way wear - owner by a motorcycle restorer until last week.
    My first Bridgeport - a Series-1! - and an equally vintage 9x24 South Bend lathe!-img_0532.jpg
    My first Bridgeport - a Series-1! - and an equally vintage 9x24 South Bend lathe!-img_0535.jpg

    Forrest in Atlanta - finally making great strides in converting my wood hobby shop to a metal hobby shop!

  2. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to McDesign For This Useful Post:

    HUMARIA (08-05-2020), Tonyg (08-05-2020), Toolmaker51 (08-02-2020)

  3. #2
    Supporting Member Toolmaker51's Avatar
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    Congrats there Forrest, my theory is we cannot have too many home machinists.
    The humidifier is fine for the weather, but that's going to be a chip magnet sitting there. I'd hang it, surrounded by a 2 or 3 sided doghouse.
    Angled placement, right side out, is 'normal' orientation, keeps protruding material/ operator from envelope of adjacent equipment. Vises first, ro-tab my go-to for what builds up table tooling next.
    If, and when, you want suggestions for additional tooling, a single post here might get more responses than you'll ever absorb.
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

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    Supporting Member McDesign's Avatar
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    Thanks - I'm setting up my home shop for mostly metal work, and have huge amounts to learn. I got these two books to start on the lathe side -
    https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    I've also been watching YouTube on folks restoring these - I figure that's a good way to get intimately familiar with every part and home it relates. These seem to have been taken care of, and used up until the time i bought them by home machinists; interestingly both involved in restoring vintage motorcycles.

    Last night I was trying to move stuff around to see what would fit and give me sufficient work area -
    My first Bridgeport - a Series-1! - and an equally vintage 9x24 South Bend lathe!-img_0584.jpg
    My first Bridgeport - a Series-1! - and an equally vintage 9x24 South Bend lathe!-img_0585.jpg

    I had to move a Belsaw planer, a radial arm saw, a 14" wood bandsaw, and a 4x6 metal bandsaw to free up this wall - now they're in the way! I think some of my woodworking stuff is going on CraigsList.

    Have you ever read Trustee from the Toolroom? Great novel by a Brit who was also a famous aeronautical engineer - he and his character here have always been two of my heroes.
    https://smile.amazon.com/Trustee-fro...s%2C169&sr=8-1

    Forrest - I know I'll have a million questions!

    Forrest in Atlanta

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    Supporting Member Toolmaker51's Avatar
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    No, unfamiliar with Schute other then A Town Like Alice; but anything with 'Toolroom' within title can't be all bad!
    Not trying to run your shop floor layout, but machine tools [with ways] are happier removed from abrasive grit and metal particles flung about. Regarding a million or one million twelve questions; we don't keep tally; let them fly!
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

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    Supporting Member McDesign's Avatar
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    Absolutely. Going to put the drill press where that 6x48 is, and the 6x48 where the drill press is, with the grinders and sanders on the other side of the shop - give me a minute!

    Looked up the s/n this morning, the BP is 1967 and the little South Bend lathe is 1923! Hard to believe.

    Forrest

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    Supporting Member mklotz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toolmaker51 View Post
    No, unfamiliar with Schute other then A Town Like Alice; but anything with 'Toolroom' within title can't be all bad!
    Not trying to run your shop floor layout, but machine tools [with ways] are happier removed from abrasive grit and metal particles flung about. Regarding a million or one million twelve questions; we don't keep tally; let them fly!
    Nevil Shute Norway was an aeronautical engineer and author. Trustee from the Toolroom is one of his best books, IMO, but his most compelling work is On the Beach.

    He worked on the R100 British airship. It was scrapped after the accident of its sister ship, the R101. The paragraph below, from the Wikipedia article on Shute, offers insight to the man that will resonate with most of the forum members involved in technical work.


    Shute gives a detailed account of the development of the two airships in his 1954 autobiographical work, Slide Rule.[5] His account is very critical of the R101 design and management team, and strongly hints that senior team members were complicit in concealing flaws in the airship's design and construction. In The Tender Ship, Manhattan Project engineer and Virginia Tech professor Arthur Squires used Shute's account of the R100 and R101 as a primary illustration of his thesis that governments are usually incompetent managers of technology projects.[6]
    ---
    Regards, Marv


    Home Shop Freeware
    http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

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    Tonyg (08-05-2020), Toolmaker51 (08-04-2020)

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    Supporting Member Toolmaker51's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mklotz View Post
    Nevil Shute Norway was an aeronautical engineer and author. Trustee from the Toolroom is one of his best books, IMO, but his most compelling work is On the Beach.

    He worked on the R100 British airship. It was scrapped after the accident of its sister ship, the R101. The paragraph below, from the Wikipedia article on Shute, offers insight to the man that will resonate with most of the forum members involved in technical work.


    Shute gives a detailed account of the development of the two airships in his 1954 autobiographical work, Slide Rule.[5] His account is very critical of the R101 design and management team, and strongly hints that senior team members were complicit in concealing flaws in the airship's design and construction. In The Tender Ship, Manhattan Project engineer and Virginia Tech professor Arthur Squires used Shute's account of the R100 and R101 as a primary illustration of his thesis that governments are usually incompetent managers of technology projects.[6]
    Those are bells rung frequently, here on HMT.net and elsewhere.
    How are we surprised, though? The same brilliant group of minds cannot understand meanings of perfectly clear linguistic and legal statements; while offering new-think interpretations. What on earth is there to misconstrue in "Shall not"?
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

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    Supporting Member Toolmaker51's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by McDesign View Post
    Absolutely. Going to put the drill press where that 6x48 is, and the 6x48 where the drill press is, with the grinders and sanders on the other side of the shop - give me a minute!

    Looked up the s/n this morning, the BP is 1967 and the little South Bend lathe is 1923! Hard to believe.

    Forrest
    Give me a minute, lol. I do virtually ALL of my own rigging and moving up to roughly 7 or 8000 pounds. It always takes more than a minute. One favorite pairing is a drill press with a wide speed range [especially lower RPM's] next to a mill; tapping, hole chamfering, countersinking, and piloted spotfacing. No sense cranking table/ knee for parts that slide freely or register to stops. Saved untold hours this way, often deburring while a hole is bored etc.
    Sincerely,
    Toolmaker51
    ...we'll learn more by wandering than searching...

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    Supporting Member gatz's Avatar
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    You're off to a good start there, Forrrest. I like the BPs with a short table. I've got a clone with a 42" table. Works great in a crowded shop.

    Along with the others, find a better location for the dehumidifier. And the rotary phase converter would be gathering chips as well.
    Might want to hang that up on the wall with some stout brackets. Some of those make noise, so the higher the better.

    Dang heavy bench vise ya got there !


    Good luck with your new endeavor.
    gatz

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    Supporting Member McDesign's Avatar
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    Thanks - gonna' re-arrange and make brackets this weekend based on the advice I'm getting. Bench vise was grandad's - a Reed 105S.

    Humidity-wise - I've run the dehumidifier continuously since last weekend (cycling) and shop temps are 72-80F, with relative humidity 45-55%. It's an awfully humid summer in Atlanta!

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