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Thread: Proof Of Concept Hydraulic Bandsaw Feed Rate Limiter

  1. #1
    Supporting Member rgsparber's Avatar
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    Proof Of Concept Hydraulic Bandsaw Feed Rate Limiter

    (title should read Pneumatic and not hydraulic!)
    When sawing thin stock on a horizontal bandsaw, it is essential that the feed rate be slow. Otherwise, teeth start to shear off and the cut veers away from true. Plenty of nice homemade hydraulic feed rate controlling devices exist but, as usual, I wanted to find a different path.

    This video shows a possible simple way to control the feed rate. This is just a proof of concept and needs more work before I make something to keep.

    If you are interested, please see




    Your comments are welcome. All of us are smarter than any one of us.


    Thanks,

    Rick

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    Last edited by rgsparber; Feb 28, 2019 at 10:48 AM.
    Rick

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    Alan Purdy (Mar 1, 2019), aussie (Mar 1, 2019), lavern s (Mar 2, 2019), mklotz (Feb 28, 2019), mwmkravchenko (Apr 12, 2019), olderdan (Feb 28, 2019), Paul Jones (Mar 4, 2019), Scotsman Hosie (Mar 1, 2019), Seedtick (Feb 28, 2019), Tule (Mar 1, 2019)

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    Supporting Member mklotz's Avatar
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    Very clever, as usual, Rick.

    For folks without sinus afflictions, probably the most commonly available bottle would be the ubiquitous two liter soda/water bottle. A 'calibrated' simple hole in the cap used in combination with the down pressure spring on the saw should provide the correct feed.

    I have a tube from an HF 13" tire that already has a leak. I'll have to give that a try.

    I wonder if something like modeling clay or duct seal could be used; varying the width of the piece being crushed could control the descent rate.

    Oh, and you have good taste in bandsaws. Or I do. I have exactly that model Enco bandsaw. One of the most useful tools I ever bought.
    ---
    Regards, Marv


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    Supporting Member rgsparber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mklotz View Post
    Very clever, as usual, Rick.

    For folks without sinus afflictions, probably the most commonly available bottle would be the ubiquitous two liter soda/water bottle. A 'calibrated' simple hole in the cap used in combination with the down pressure spring on the saw should provide the correct feed.

    I have a tube from an HF 13" tire that already has a leak. I'll have to give that a try.

    I wonder if something like modeling clay or duct seal could be used; varying the width of the piece being crushed could control the descent rate.

    Oh, and you have good taste in bandsaws. Or I do. I have exactly that model Enco bandsaw. One of the most useful tools I ever bought.
    Thanks Marv.

    That bandsaw was the first machine I bought for my shop. Never had any trouble with it although am dismayed by the rising cost of blades.

    I visited my local Home Depot and bought the Air Shim, gate valve, and a needle valve. I found the needed tubing in my junk box. I can get a nice, controlled feed rate with it but do have to use the attached squeeze bulb to pump it up. Not as handy as the plastic bottle where I just partially unscrew the cap.

    I gave more thought to your suggestion of using a polycarbonate bottle. The bottle I use is polypropylene and designed to flex. The pop bottle will deflate nicely but will not spring back and will fatigue leading to cracks. I'm looking for an alternate to the nasal bottle.

    Rick
    Last edited by rgsparber; Mar 1, 2019 at 07:04 AM. Reason: updated information
    Rick

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    Just a thought, how about using a screen door closer. The tubular pneumatic type with a larger knob for the closing rate instead of the supplied screw adjuster. Probably remove the spring too.

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    Supporting Member rgsparber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WorkerB View Post
    Just a thought, how about using a screen door closer. The tubular pneumatic type with a larger knob for the closing rate instead of the supplied screw adjuster. Probably remove the spring too.
    I mentioned John Herrmann's solution in the video. This is what he so masterfully did. It is a fine solution, just would not be a new one if I did it.

    Rick
    Rick

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    My bad. I didnít watch the video
    But hey, great minds and all that!!

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    Supporting Member rgsparber's Avatar
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    My second prototype:


    Rick
    Rick

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    Quote Originally Posted by rgsparber View Post
    I mentioned John Herrmann's solution in the video. This is what he so masterfully did. It is a fine solution, just would not be a new one if I did it.

    Rick
    Nice thinking Rick.

    Does anyone have a link to John Herrmann's hydraulic unit? I had no luck with several search's I tried. I did keep getting distracted with other various great ideas though. Hard to focus.

  12. #9
    Supporting Member rgsparber's Avatar
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    John published it in Home Shop Machinist.

    Rick



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    Rick

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