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Thread: Turning Matching External/Internal Tapers

  1. #1
    Supporting Member rgsparber's Avatar
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    rgsparber's Tools

    Turning Matching External/Internal Tapers

    One of the many useful operations possible with a lathe is to cut tapers. These can be external or internal. Sometimes an external taper is cut and I want a matching internal taper. This article presents a procedure that requires no math or measuring to set up to cut the internal taper.

    If you are interested, please see

    https://rick.sparber.org/MatchingTapers.pdf

    Your comments are welcome. All of us are smarter than any one of us.


    Thanks,

    Rick
    Rick

  2. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to rgsparber For This Useful Post:

    bigtrev8xl (11-29-2019), Carnel (11-29-2019), FEM2008 (11-28-2019), Jon (11-28-2019), mklotz (11-28-2019), olderdan (11-28-2019), Seedtick (11-28-2019)

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    Supporting Member mklotz's Avatar
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    mklotz's Tools
    Very clever, Rick. Thanks.

    Just to add to this discussion, not meant as a criticism of your method, here's how I've done it before.

    Set the compound to track the angle of the rear side of the male taper.

    Now mount a boring bar and, lathe running in reverse, cut the (male) taper on the back side of the workpiece.

    The lathe is already configured to cut the female taper conventionally.

    If your lathe has a chuck that threads onto the spindle, you need to be careful making the male cut. Too deep a cut and the chuck can unscrew. I've machined tapers this way but kept the cut to only a few thousandths per pass.
    ---
    Regards, Marv


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    Supporting Member olderdan's Avatar
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    olderdan's Tools
    Adding further to the taper turning subject, Joe Peiczynski has an excellent video on his channel here.
    for setting the compound slide spot on first time for known tapers without a master.

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  7. #4
    Supporting Member rgsparber's Avatar
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    rgsparber's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by mklotz View Post
    Very clever, Rick. Thanks.

    Just to add to this discussion, not meant as a criticism of your method, here's how I've done it before.

    Set the compound to track the angle of the rear side of the male taper.

    Now mount a boring bar and, lathe running in reverse, cut the (male) taper on the back side of the workpiece.

    The lathe is already configured to cut the female taper conventionally.

    If your lathe has a chuck that threads onto the spindle, you need to be careful making the male cut. Too deep a cut and the chuck can unscrew. I've machined tapers this way but kept the cut to only a few thousandths per pass.
    Marv,

    I really like your approach! By not disturbing the compound, you get exactly the same taper for external and internal. Glad you warned about running in reverse with a screw-on chuck.

    Thanks!

    Rick
    Rick

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    Supporting Member rgsparber's Avatar
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    rgsparber's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by olderdan View Post
    Adding further to the taper turning subject, Joe Peiczynski has an excellent video on his channel here.
    for setting the compound slide spot on first time for known tapers without a master.
    Olderdan,

    Joe Pie is one of the all-time master teachers. I love his use of applied mathematics in the shop. Very powerful.

    I understand his angle setting method but I didn't catch how he sets the starting diameter.

    Rick
    Rick

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    Supporting Member olderdan's Avatar
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    olderdan's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by rgsparber View Post
    Olderdan,

    Joe Pie is one of the all-time master teachers. I love his use of applied mathematics in the shop. Very powerful.

    I understand his angle setting method but I didn't catch how he sets the starting diameter.

    Rick
    Hi Rick, not sure what you mean by a start dia, all Joe Pie is doing is measuring three sides of a triangle so angle must be correct. I know you get that. A start dia on the work can then be anything you want. If it has to be a size I usually turn a short parallel reference dia and run up the taper from there.

  11. #7
    Supporting Member rgsparber's Avatar
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    rgsparber's Tools
    Joe Pie mentioned in passing that he was going to explain how to set the diameter at the entrance to the cone. Either it was super quick or he never explained it.

    Rick
    Rick

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    mrehmus2's Tools
    The only caveat I see with this approach is that unless the cutting tool is on the axial center-line of the spindle, the taper cut will have a concave or convex bow in it. Or so I am told by one master machinist I know.
    Also, you can use a line of chalk on the male taper to check the fit in the female taper. It should be smoothly wiped if the fit is good.

  13. #9
    Supporting Member mr herb's Avatar
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    mr herb's Tools
    Mrehmus2.

    You have mentioned a very significant part of angle cutting.. Any tool that you use , Indicator or cutting point of tool bit must be on dead center of the lathe. Rick does this with the indicator, altho he is doing it almost subconsciously, because he has done it so often, but doesn't mention the tool point..

    Otherwise, a magnificent presentation, Rick!

    mr herb

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    Supporting Member olderdan's Avatar
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    olderdan's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by rgsparber View Post
    Joe Pie mentioned in passing that he was going to explain how to set the diameter at the entrance to the cone. Either it was super quick or he never explained it.

    Rick
    Hi Rick, now I know what you are aiming for I only know two ways of doing that, One of the most difficult things to measure is the large end of an internal taper. I either make a gauge like this.
    Turning Matching External/Internal Tapers-tapers.jpg

    Or turn a short register on the front of the bore which can then be removed. I would be interested in an updated method from Joe Pie, maybe he would respond to a request.
    Regards.

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