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Thread: Using rope to remove snow from roof - GIF

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    baja (Feb 25, 2021), jimfols (Feb 24, 2021), mwmkravchenko (Feb 24, 2021), nova_robotics (Feb 24, 2021), Ralphxyz (Feb 24, 2021), toeless joe (Feb 24, 2021), trigger (Feb 24, 2021)

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    trigger's Avatar
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    So I live in the tropics snow is not something I see ,my thoughts for this would be a heating element embedded in the roof slope thinking floor heating would this be a option sure this must be a major issue every year only downside would be cost ???

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    TheElderBrother's Avatar
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    Couple thoughts on the heating element...

    Quote Originally Posted by trigger View Post
    So I live in the tropics snow is not something I see ,my thoughts for this would be a heating element embedded in the roof slope thinking floor heating would this be a option sure this must be a major issue every year only downside would be cost ???
    1. Huge energy costs.
    2. Huge fire hazard
    3. Potentially turn masses of snow into masses of ice instead of getting rid of it. (Melt enough snow, pop a fuze, and you get two inches of solid ice instead of a foot of snow. Not a good resolution...)
    4. Rope is cheaper.

    Honestly, though, the only real concern about all that snow is the weight and wear on the roof. If it was weightless, it would be a great insulator. Snow makes a fantastic building material while it lasts. I used to take my Scouts and camp on a lake in Connecticut, literally on the lake. A foot of ice covered by a foot of snow, and the boys were amazed at how warm you could sleep, and how they could keep a moderate fire going without drilling down into the water below.

    Snow is fascinating as long as you get someone else to shovel it.

    TheElderBrother

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    trigger's Avatar
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    I stand educated/corrected thanks shelve stupid idea and enjoy the 32 deg C in my neck of the woods and leave the white stuff to you

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    Supporting Member hemmjo's Avatar
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    hemmjo's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by trigger View Post
    So I live in the tropics snow is not something I see ,my thoughts for this would be a heating element embedded in the roof slope thinking floor heating would this be a option sure this must be a major issue every year only downside would be cost ???
    Heated roofs are indeed a thing. https://heatedroofsystems.com

    Since snow is such a good insulator it does not take much heat the roof a few degrees, enough to melt the snow. It is not a system that would be energized all the time. As mentioned it would not be cheap to operate, but sometimes spending a little money to prevent damage saves a lot in repairs down the road. Typically this would only be used when weather conditions are right to form ice damns, or if there is excessive snow, etc. It would be easy to flip on when necessary.

    There are also systems that heat gutters to allow water to drain.

    The rope is a good idea, and actually looks fun, for maybe one or two times. As we get older, it is safer to flip a switch on the heater. Looks to me like this guys have done that before!!!

    PS. I could sure use some sunshine!!! Ship some of that up here!!!

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    trigger (Feb 25, 2021)

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    Clearly I had to consult Prof Google as for the sunshine that you have to come get yourself I don't move more than 10 deg S or N far too cold 👦

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    Supporting Member jdurand's Avatar
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    Our new house has keepers on it to prevent the snow from sliding off.

    Also, you REALLY don't want a warm roof under snow, the water formed can back up and get under the shingles...then freeze there causing $$$$ damage.




    Snow keepers can be seen near the edge of the roof.

    Using rope to remove snow from roof - GIF-2020-04-25_roof-12.jpeg

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    I thought the roofs in snowy country were made with a high slope to help the snow slide off unassisted.
    Keepers to hold the snow on the roof is a new one to me.

    If the attic is sufficiently insulated and strong enough to hold the weight, the snow would be beneficial xtra insulation I guess.

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    Supporting Member hemmjo's Avatar
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    As with most issues, there is no single correct solution.

    In a perfect world, the snow would land on your roof, you roof would be strong enough to support any amount that ends up on your roof. You would be warm and cozy under the additional insulation until the snow melts in spring.

    In reality the widely varying conditions in various zones require that you deal with the snow in various ways.

    High pitched roofs do shed snow, as long as there are no doors where the sliding snow can land on people, just let if slide off. But then you have all of that snow leaning up against the side of the structure, possibly blocking windows etc.

    Metal roofs are slippery, even low pitched roofs, can allow snow to slide off. As with most avalanches, this often happens when the snow is disturbed in some way. This often happens with a door "slamming" shut, shaking the snow loose. Often while the "slammer" is still standing outside the door. This can lead to a situation that is either humorous, tragic or any place between, depending on the amount of snow or ice and the physical condition of the person under falling show or ice. Thus the "snow keepers" on metal roofs.

    In other situations, depending on climate and home construction/insulation/attic ventilation, the roof surface may change from above freezing to below freezing many times while covered with snow, typically each day/night cycle. When this happens, water runs down the warm roof, under the snow. When it get to the cold edge of the roof it freezes. This creates a dam which allows water to build up and run under the shingles.

    There are more situations too numerous and complex to cover here. The point is, most of the points made so far in this thread are valid. The rope technique that began the thread is a good solution for the situation where it was used. There are other good ones.



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