Free 173 Best Homemade Tools eBook:  
Become a founding member: 500+ tool plans, full site access, and more.

User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Vacuum chuck for PCB milling and engraving.

  1. #1
    Supporting Member tonyfoale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    936
    Thanks
    373
    Thanked 1,593 Times in 460 Posts
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    tonyfoale's Tools

    Vacuum chuck for PCB milling and engraving.

    I present a description of a small vacuum chuck that I made for holding pieces of PCB for isolation milling as well as pieces for engraving.

    Vacuum chuck for PCB milling and engraving.-engraving.jpg Vacuum chuck for PCB milling and engraving.-firsttest.jpg Click thumbnails for full size.

    Above we have a couple of test examples. The milling was done with a small D bit in a high speed spindle clamped to the quill.

    Vacuum chuck for PCB milling and engraving.-spindle-mill.jpg

    I have put a 20 minute video on Youtube



    In that I describe the manufacture of the chuck as well as discuss the vacuum needed and ways to get it. The process of milling some pieces is also shown. Don't forget to like, share and subscribe to the video channel to ensure notice of forthcoming videos.

    In the meantime here are a few stills.

    Vacuum chuck for PCB milling and engraving.-vacplate02.jpg Vacuum chuck for PCB milling and engraving.-vacplate03.jpg

    Vacuum chuck for PCB milling and engraving.-vacpump.jpg Vacuum chuck for PCB milling and engraving.-drill-jig03.jpg

    Vacuum chuck for PCB milling and engraving.-pcb-test.jpg Vacuum chuck for PCB milling and engraving.-alignment-bushes.jpg

    Bob Warfield has posted an interesting article on vacuum workholding aimed at CNC routers which can be found at:
    Vacuum workholding

    There was a recent post on this forum about using fridge motors for vacuum pumps http://www.homemadetools.net/forum/h...uum-pump-71121
    Last edited by tonyfoale; 02-17-2019 at 03:22 PM. Reason: Pressed save by mistake.

  2. The Following 10 Users Say Thank You to tonyfoale For This Useful Post:

    12L14 (07-31-2019), HobieDave (04-14-2020), Jon (02-18-2019), LMMasterMariner (02-17-2019), olderdan (02-18-2019), Paul Jones (02-19-2019), rgsparber (02-18-2019), rossbotics (02-19-2019), that_other_guy (02-20-2019), threesixesinarow (02-18-2019)

  3. #2
    Supporting Member rgsparber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    844
    Thanks
    422
    Thanked 1,757 Times in 453 Posts
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    rgsparber's Tools
    Tony,

    Outstanding video! I'm ready to take the plunge (pun intended).

    I just drilled some #65 holes in a circuit board at 5,000 RPM and 0.5 IPM. It worked fine. I know I can feed faster but didn't want to push it yet. First problem I had was securing the board. That vacuum fixture is exactly what I need. A friend of mine was an expert on drilling tiny holes for GM and he said 5,000 RPM is fine as long as I peck deep holes. However, for engraving, I beleive I will need to up where you are.

    Thanks for the great information.

    Rick
    Rick

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to rgsparber For This Useful Post:

    tonyfoale (02-19-2019)

  5. #3
    Supporting Member tonyfoale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    936
    Thanks
    373
    Thanked 1,593 Times in 460 Posts
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    tonyfoale's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by rgsparber View Post
    Tony,
    I just drilled some #65 holes in a circuit board at 5,000 RPM and 0.5 IPM. It worked fine. I know I can feed faster but didn't want to push it yet. First problem I had was securing the board. That vacuum fixture is exactly what I need. A friend of mine was an expert on drilling tiny holes for GM and he said 5,000 RPM is fine as long as I peck deep holes. However, for engraving, I beleive I will need to up where you are.
    Rick
    Several decades ago when I drew tracks by hand for etching I used a tiny hand held drill (30,000 rpm IIRC). It worked fine but it was tedious when I had several boards to do.

  6. #4
    Supporting Member rossbotics's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    714
    Thanks
    964
    Thanked 1,464 Times in 396 Posts
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    rossbotics's Tools
    Awesome Tony, great job and vid.

    Doug
    Comments are always welcome
    Doug

    Subscribe to my you tube channel

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDD..._as=subscriber



    Tool Plans for Sale by rossbotics






  7. The Following User Says Thank You to rossbotics For This Useful Post:

    tonyfoale (02-19-2019)

  8. #5
    Supporting Member tonyfoale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    936
    Thanks
    373
    Thanked 1,593 Times in 460 Posts
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    tonyfoale's Tools
    I have added a second video on this subject. It looks in general at PCB making by both etching and milling options. I demonstrate methods which I have used successfully and there is a review of some freeware that assists the process of going from an idea to a PCB.

    You can see the video here :-



    Rick recently posted a toner transfer method which might be of use http://www.homemadetools.net/forum/l...aminator-71497 if you go down the etching route.

    Here is a link to an interesting article on photo production of PCBs photo etching PCBs

    There are a ton of videos on the net showing in great detail the process of making PCBs, some articles/videos are very good but as with everything on the net some are quite bad.

    A bit of history, I started an interest in electronics almost 70 years ago when I was 8 and was introduced to a crystal set. It was magic. My father was an instructor of electrical engineering in the Royal Navy during WW2 but after 2 weeks of my constant questions he disappointed me by running out of answers and I had to turn to the library for more info. It was an engrossing hobby for me until I was 16 when I discovered the joys of racing motorcycles, then my interest turned more toward mechanical stuff. Although I never really kept up with electronic trends I always retained enough knowledge to make things like ignition systems and tachos as required. Nowadays things have got a whole lot easier for those who need some electronic content in their work or hobby pursuits. Cheap microcontrollers and microprocessors like the Arduino and Pi have transformed that world. No longer is detailed electronic knowledge needed to build useful devices using hidden electron flow. In many cases you only need connect some input devices such as a temperature or position sensor to an Arduino and a PC or LCD display as an output to get a useful tool without adding other components. All that controlled by software. There has been shift from dedicated electronic circuits to general purpose devices which become dedicated to a specific task through software commands. I think that most people versed in the mechanical arts find learning software programming infinitely preferable to learning the intricacies of traditional electronic circuit design.
    Apart from the mentioned projects like ignition system and tachos etc. some my recent project include things like, pressure and flow measurement for a port flow bench, shock dyno, strobe synchronisation for slo-mo videos of valve float, reading from linear and rotary encoders, motor speed control, controller for a pellet home heating system and a bunch of other stuff.

  9. #6
    Supporting Member tonyfoale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    936
    Thanks
    373
    Thanked 1,593 Times in 460 Posts
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    tonyfoale's Tools
    I just came across this video which is very interesting if you can put up with the over excitable juvenile prattle of the presenter


  10. #7
    Content Editor
    Supporting Member
    DIYer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    3,090
    Thanks
    559
    Thanked 1,341 Times in 1,208 Posts
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)


    Thanks tonyfoale! We've added your Vacuum Chuck to our Workholding category,
    as well as to your builder page: tonyfoale's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:




  11. #8
    Supporting Member rgsparber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    844
    Thanks
    422
    Thanked 1,757 Times in 453 Posts
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    rgsparber's Tools
    Tony,

    While I wait for my new vacuum pump to arrive, I decided to play with using Elmer's white glue to stick a coupon of FR4 single sided circuit board matrerial down on a piece of MDF. I put down a very thin layer of the glue, then the board, and finally about a pound of weight. Let it set up for 30 minutes.

    I was able to mill a series of cuts across it deep enough to separate the sheet of copper into strips. Then, just as a torture test, I put the coupon, mounted on the MDF, against my 3M wheel. The wheel removed some of the copper around the edges but the coupon stayed solidly attached to the MDF.

    Since this glue is water soluable, I was able to easily release the coupon by running water over it for a few seconds. Lifted right off.

    I did take a picture but keep getting an error when I try to upload it. It is a .jpg file.

    Rick
    Rick

  12. #9
    Supporting Member tonyfoale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    936
    Thanks
    373
    Thanked 1,593 Times in 460 Posts
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    tonyfoale's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by rgsparber View Post
    Tony,

    While I wait for my new vacuum pump to arrive, I decided to play with using Elmer's white glue to stick a coupon of FR4 single sided circuit board matrerial down on a piece of MDF. I put down a very thin layer of the glue, then the board, and finally about a pound of weight. Let it set up for 30 minutes.

    I was able to mill a series of cuts across it deep enough to separate the sheet of copper into strips. Then, just as a torture test, I put the coupon, mounted on the MDF, against my 3M wheel. The wheel removed some of the copper around the edges but the coupon stayed solidly attached to the MDF.

    Since this glue is water soluable, I was able to easily release the coupon by running water over it for a few seconds. Lifted right off.

    I did take a picture but keep getting an error when I try to upload it. It is a .jpg file.

    Rick
    Good to know, should work just as well with double sided boards.

  13. #10
    Supporting Member tonyfoale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    936
    Thanks
    373
    Thanked 1,593 Times in 460 Posts
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    tonyfoale's Tools
    Quote Originally Posted by DIYer View Post
    <!-- BEGIN /var/www/html/homemadetools/protected/modules/zeus/views/tool/postUpdate.php -->
    Thanks tonyfoale! We've added your Vacuum Chuck to our Workholding category,
    as well as to your builder page: tonyfoale's Homemade Tools. Your receipt:
    This link appears to be broken.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •